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SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARD-WINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. 2 STUDY GROUP EXAMINES ST. JOHN PAUL II’S ‘LETTER TO WOMEN’ MORRIS MAY 25, 2017 15 R ELIGIOUS J UBILEE M ASS 66 religious mark their significant anniversaries at annual celebration By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPORTER MISSION OFFICE COORDINATOR MEETS POPE 4 DIOCESAN 48TH ANNUAL MOTORCYCLE MASS AND BLESSING HELD IN PATERSON 6 8-9 12-13 15 16-20 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Youth Viewpoint What To Do Classifieds PASSAIC The Paterson Diocese held its jubilee celebration honor-ing 66 religious who are marking milestone anniversaries this year. Dedicating their lives to various ministries in the Church and the Diocese, the religious sisters, broth-ers and priests came together on May 20 for the Diocesan Jubilee for Religious at St. Mary Assumption Church here. Msgr. James Mahoney, dioc-esan vicar general and pastor of Corpus Christi Parish in Chatham Township, was the main celebrant of the Mass. Bishop Serratelli, who could not attend due to a prior JUBILEE CELEBRATION Msgr. James Mahoney, diocesan vicar general, moderator of the Curia, and pastor of Corpus Christi Parish, BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Chatham Township, congratulates Sister of Christian Charity Immaculata Aborline, who is celebrating her 70th anniversary in religious life this year. Sixty-six religious jubilarians were honored May 20 at the Diocese’s annual Religious Jubilee Mass in St. Mary Church, Passaic. engagement, sent his congratula-tions to all the religious jubilarians. The anniversaries being marked by the jubilarians ranged from 25 years to 80 years and represented several religious orders that serve in the Diocese and undertake ma-ny distinct charisms and ministries, which include education, health-care, pastoral care, mission work and more. Filippini Sister Ascenza Tizzano, provincial superior of the Religious Teachers Filippini, who marked 60 years in religious life, proclaimed the Second Reading during the lit-urgy. She told the Beacon that she was grateful to be able to celebrate her diamond jubilee. “It has been a privilege to serve the Church,” she said. During the Mass, the reli-gious jubilarians stood and recit-ed together a renewal of commit-ment to consecrated life. Msgr. Mahoney delivered the homily. Toward the end of Mass, Kerry Timony, administrative assis-tant to the diocesan vice chancel-lor and delegate to religious, an-nounced the names of honorees in attendance as Msgr. Mahoney pre-sented certificates and gifts to the jubilarians. Afterward, the con-gregation was invited to a recep-tion lunch provided by Msgr. John Demkovich, diocesan mission of-fice director and associate judge in RELIGIOUS JUBILEE ON 10 Neurosurgeon speaks about God’s guidance in operating room By MICHAEL WOJCIK NEWS EDITOR MADISON St. Teresa of Calcutta, the celebrated champion of the world’s poor, once spoke about the Lord’s power and influence in her own life by describing herself simply as “a pencil in the hand of God.” Last week, Deacon and Dr. Brian Beyerl of Assumption Parish, Morristown, a renowned neuro-surgeon, took the opportunity to speak publicly about his long, dis-tinguished medical career as a “healing ministry.” This led him to quip, “If that’s so [about St. Teresa], then I’m a scalpel [in the Lord’s hand].” Laugher from the audience echoed in the auditorium of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here on May 17, as Deacon Beyerl made that humor-ous observation, while talking about how God guides his hands, mind and heart in all aspects of his life. Those include his roles as a surgeon; a husband, father and grandfather; and as a deacon at Assumption. The doctor “was in” at St. Paul’s that night to engage in a public conversation about faith and life for the final session of its “Speaking of Faith” series, during his academic year. “I am asking, ‘Lord give me strength; give me the ability [to practice medicine].’ There is an in-tellectual component that you have to have, but I believe that most of it is hard work. The Lord gave me that strength,” said Deacon Beyerl, attending neurosurgeon at Morristown Medical Center and Overlook Hospital, Summit. His expertise includes stereotactic neurosurgery, radiosurgery for brain tumors, general surgery and spine surgery. “As people of faith, we realize that we are not the cen-ter of the universe — and we try to wrestle that back: the pride and ev-erything else. We say, ‘Thy will be done,’ because it’s not us. It’s a con-tinual surrender,” he said. That evening, the 63-year-old doctor engaged in a lively con-versation — sometimes funny and sometimes serious — with Father Manning, St. Paul’s exec-utive director and diocesan vicar NEUROSURGEON ON 5

Religious Jubilee Mass

Cecile Pagliarulo

66 religious mark their significant anniversaries at annual celebration

PASSAIC The Paterson Diocese held its jubilee celebration honoring 66 religious who are marking milestone anniversaries this year. Dedicating their lives to various ministries in the Church and the Diocese, the religious sisters, brothers and priests came together on May 20 for the Diocesan Jubilee for Religious at St. Mary Assumption Church here.

Msgr. James Mahoney, diocesan vicar general and pastor of Corpus Christi Parish in Chatham Township, was the main celebrant of the Mass. Bishop Serratelli, who could not attend due to a prior engagement, sent his congratulations to all the religious jubilarians.

The anniversaries being marked by the jubilarians ranged from 25 years to 80 years and represented several religious orders that serve in the Diocese and undertake many distinct charisms and ministries, which include education, healthcare, pastoral care, mission work and more.

Filippini Sister Ascenza Tizzano, provincial superior of the Religious Teachers Filippini, who marked 60 years in religious life, proclaimed the Second Reading during the liturgy. She told the Beacon that she was grateful to be able to celebrate her diamond jubilee. “It has been a privilege to serve the Church,” she said.

During the Mass, the religious jubilarians stood and recited together a renewal of commitment to consecrated life. Msgr. Mahoney delivered the homily. Toward the end of Mass, Kerry Timony, administrative assistant to the diocesan vice chancellor and delegate to religious, announced the names of honorees in attendance as Msgr. Mahoney presented certificates and gifts to the jubilarians. Afterward, the congregation was invited to a reception lunch provided by Msgr. John Demkovich, diocesan mission office director and associate judge in the Tribunal, who concelebrated the Mass along with Father Jorge Rodriguez, pastor of St. Mary’s and several diocesan and religious priests. Also attending were several diocesan seminarians.

Religious, jubilarians and those supporting them filled St. Mary’s with hymns of praise and prayers for the honorees and all religious in the Diocese. In their renewal of commitment, they prayed, “I renew my vows to follow Christ in chastity, poverty and obedience. Grant me the grace, Lord, through the intercession of Our Lady and the prayers and support of my institute, to live these vows faithfully.”

In his homily, Msgr. Mahoney credited the religious for making the world a better place. Speaking on behalf of all who have received the witness, the ministry and the prayers by those in religious life, Msgr. Mahoney said, “It is my privilege to proclaim today what each of our jubilarians truly means to the Church.”

Combined together the jubilarians have contributed more than 4,000 years of love, commitment and prayers. Msgr. Mahoney described the contributions of the religious to a stone being thrown in the pond and the continuous ripples it makes. “What you have done through your commitment to your religious life is that you have given the Church rippling graces. We live in an interconnected world where the grace of the Holy Spirit and your prayers have rippled throughout our world.”

“The first movement of the ripple began with your profession and then it continued affecting not only yourself and other people but also eventually all those that you serve in your missions, in your orders and congregations, in your works and ministries in schools, parishes, hospitals and with the elderly and the young. As change agents in our world and society, you can see the ripple,” said Msgr. Mahoney.

“This is the Church and this Diocese celebrates with you and in your honor. Our world, our Church, your communities and congregations are better places because of the ‘yes’ you declared so many years ago. The ripples of the Holy Spirit will never stop filling up with love to all those who need it and that’s what you have done, each of you, by yourself and together have made this world a better place. And that’s why today is a day we say, ‘Well done, good and faithful servant.’ The Church, your congregation, your orders and this Diocese are all in your debt.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Religious+Jubilee+Mass/2795324/411916/article.html.

Neurosurgeon Speaks About God’s Guidance In Operating Room

Michael Wojcik

MADISON St. Teresa of Calcutta, the celebrated champion of the world’s poor, once spoke about the Lord’s power and influence in her own life by describing herself simply as “a pencil in the hand of God.” Last week, Deacon and Dr. Brian Beyerl of Assumption Parish, Morristown, a renowned neurosurgeon, took the opportunity to speak publicly about his long, distinguished medical career as a “healing ministry.” This led him to quip, “If that’s so [about St. Teresa], then I’m a scalpel [in the Lord’s hand].”

Laugher from the audience echoed in the auditorium of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here on May 17, as Deacon Beyerl made that humorous observation, while talking about how God guides his hands, mind and heart in all aspects of his life. Those include his roles as a surgeon; a husband, father and grandfather; and as a deacon at Assumption. The doctor “was in” at St. Paul’s that night to engage in a public conversation about faith and life for the final session of its “Speaking of Faith” series, during his academic year.

“I am asking, ‘Lord give me strength; give me the ability [to practice medicine].’ There is an intellectual component that you have to have, but I believe that most of it is hard work. The Lord gave me that strength,” said Deacon Beyerl, attending neurosurgeon at Morristown Medical Center and Overlook Hospital, Summit. His expertise includes stereotactic neurosurgery, radiosurgery for brain tumors, general surgery and spine surgery. “As people of faith, we realize that we are not the center of the universe — and we try to wrestle that back: the pride and everything else. We say, ‘Thy will be done,’ because it’s not us. It’s a continual surrender,” he said.

That evening, the 63-year-old doctor engaged in a lively conversation — sometimes funny and sometimes serious — with Father Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization. They sat in chairs across from each other in the center’s auditorium in front of about 90 audience members, who included many of his medical colleagues and Assumption parishioners. They listened as Father Manning asked Deacon Beyerl questions about God and life and, later, the audience had the opportunity to ask St. Paul’s guest their own questions near the end of the session.

“ ‘Speaking of Faith’ is series of unrehearsed conversations with people from all walks of life about their experiences of God and about how they integrate their life and faith,” Father Manning said.

Prayer plays a significant role in Deacon Beyerl’s profession as a doctor. He prays for his patients and prays, as he scrubs his hands before surgery. Also, he shares his faith and prays with those patients, who are receptive, but never forces his beliefs on anyone. When Father Manning asked, “Have you ever experienced the presence of God in the operating room?” the doctor answered with a resounding, “Constantly!”

During the conversation, Father Manning asked Deacon Beyerl about how the aspect of service — a key part of the diaconate — plays out in his ministry as a permanent deacon of the Paterson Diocese. The doctor responded, “It has definitely brought me to some unexpected places.”

Years ago, Deacon Beyerl asked Joseph Duffy, former president of Diocesan Catholic Charities, how he could use his talents in his free time. Duffy brought the doctor to Straight & Narrow, Catholic Charities’ substance-abuse treatment facility in Paterson. There, he started treating clients — “basic medical stuff: colds and blisters on their feet,” he said.

“It has been so humbling to meet these clients. They, along with my wife, Andrea, have truly become my heroes. The clients are trying so hard to better their lives,” the humble Deacon Beyerl said. “There was a gang member of the Bloods. A young woman had given birth, realized that she wanted to be a good mother and admitted herself to Straight & Narrow. Their stories are unbelievable,” he said.

The doctor called the diaconate “a tremendously gratifying experience for me” and a “privilege.” He cited his wife — who volunteers in hospice care and who “looks out for everyone’s needs” — and his fellow deacons — “who visit prisons and do so many other things” — as inspirations for his own ministry of service.

The Catholic journey of Deacon Beyerl, a former Protestant, began with his conversion to the Catholic faith, because he wanted one religion to unify his household at the time he married his wife. They have three biological children, an adopted child, two grandchildren and another grandchild on the way, he said.

Father Manning asked Deacon Beyerl, “Is there are image of God that engages you or helps you understand him: a Scriptural image or metaphor or the three attributes of God: absolute beauty, absolute truth or infinite goodness?” The doctor spoke about a profound experience at Assisi, the home of St. Francis in Italy.

“I realized that St. Francis espoused the attributes of Jesus that I find as God: compassion, humility and simplicity,” Deacon Beyerl said. “Those attributes are lifelong goals for me: compassion in my medical practice by listening to my patients’ needs; humility, because the older I get, the more I realize that I don’t have all the answers and that by God’s grace go I and my patients; and simplicity in trying to relate complex medical situations in an understandable way and to live as simply as I can.”

During the dialogue, Deacon Beyerl answered Father Manning’s question about the most difficult part of being Catholic. The doctor told the affable priest that he relies increasingly on God’s grace, the Sacrament of Reconciliation and a devotion to the Blessed Mother — a response to his understanding that, the older that he gets, the more he realizes that he is imperfect.

“I was impressed by Deacon Beyerl’s characterization of Jesus as ‘humble, compassionate and simple.’ It’s obvious from hearing his interview and seeing his interaction with a few Assumption parishioners and patients he spoke with before the interview that he lives out what he believes,” said Allan Wright, St. Paul’s academic dean. “You don’t need to be as smart as a brain surgeon to model Jesus in whatever profession or state of life you find yourself in.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Neurosurgeon+Speaks+About+God%E2%80%99s+Guidance+In+Operating+Room/2795326/411916/article.html.

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