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The Beacon The Beacon_March 23 2017 : Page 1

ALL CHURCHES IN THE DIOCESE OPEN FOR CONFESSION ON MONDAYS, 7 TO 8:30 P.M. SUSSEX THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. PASSAIC MORRIS MARCH 23, 2017 K EEPING THE F LAME OF R ELIGIOUS L IBERTY A LIVE 10 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard U.S. Supreme Court Justice Alito emphasizes importance of defending religious freedom during recent talk to Catholics By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR 5 NEW POPE JOHN XXIII MIDDLE SCHOOL OPENS Rent 8% Interest & Dividend Income 10% Grants & Contributions 10% Bishop’s Annual Appeal 23% Other (Inc. Fees) 7% ANNUAL DIOCESAN FINANCIAL UPDATE Assessments 42% 8-9 5 6-7 10 11-16 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS MADISON A “hostile wind” has been kicking up in U.S. society that threatens not only people, who profess “traditional moral beliefs,” but also more broadly, the foundation of our freedom of religious expression as enshrined in the First Amendment to the Constitution — one of our basic liberties that many Founding Fathers cham-pioned in the early days of the nation. On the evening of March 15, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito sounded that urgent warning in front of 300 local lawyers and con-cerned Catholics in his talk, “Religious Freedom in the Constitution and in Federal Law” at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. A Catholic, the guest speaker delivered an engaging hour-long presentation in the center’s auditorium as part of an ongoing lecture series by notable re-ligious and legal minds about faith and the law. Sponsoring the talk was Advocati Christi, a dioce-san fellowship of lawyers and judges, who are committed to the legal profession and the pro-fession of their faith. “One of those principles that we have always A JUSTICE FOR ALL U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito stands with Bishop Serratelli at St. Paul Inside the Walls, Madison, before he delivered a talk March 15 about “Religious Freedom in the Constitution and in Federal Law.” The Bishop spoke about the importance of religious liberty before the justice’s well-received presentation, which was sponsored by Advocati Christi, a diocesan fellow -ship of lawyers and judges. cherished in this country — one of those inalien-able rights that were endowed on all of us — is the right to the free exercise of religion. Unfortunately, I think that we are heading into a period in which our dedication to religious lib-erty is going to be tested, and therefore all of us are going to be tested,” said Alito, who has served on the Supreme Court since 2006 after being ap-pointed by President George W. Bush. “In the fu-ture, there will be pitched battles for religious freedom in courts and Congress, in state legisla-tures and town halls,” he said. Raised in Trenton, Alito traveled from Washington, D.C. back to his home state to speak in the Diocese of Paterson. He has become one of the Supreme Court’s conservative voices in many cases of national importance, including such hot-button issues as same-sex marriage, par-tial-birth abortion and the exercise of religious conscience with regard to artificial contraception. He presented a talk — that referred to a wide range of Americans In the future, from George Washing -there will be ton to Bob Dylan — a pitched battles few days before the U.S. Senate started for religious hearings on March 20 freedom in for Neil Gorsuch, Presi -dent Trump’s nominee courts and for the Su preme Court, Congress, in also considered a con-state legisla -servative like Alito. tures and town During his well-received talk, Alito halls.’ echoed the warning — U.S. S UPREME about religious free-C OURT J USTICE dom that he raised in S AMUEL A LITO his dissent in the 2015 landmark case of Ober -gefell v. Hodges, in which the court ruled by a 5-4 decision in favor of same-sex marriage. He wrote that he “feared that the decision would be used to vilify Americans, who were unwilling to ‘ JUSTICE ALITO, 2 NEWTON Since early this year, members of the Knights of Colu -mbus Don Bosco Council No. 7784 have been delivering a serious mes-sage to Confirmation students throughout Sussex County: that schools — including public schools — are not “God-free” zones and that the law mandates them to permit students to express their faith freely. During this current academic year, Rich Matrisciano and Bob Shaud of the Knights have been trav-eling to Diocesan parishes in Sussex County to host “Free to Speak,” a Newton knights’ program informs students of religious liberty rights and most recently at St. religious education director. “It was Joseph here. In addition, the pair interesting to have real-life scenarios ‘F REE TO S PE A K ’ Sparta, plans to speak at the next Paterson like prayer before an athletic event, By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR 30-minute PowerPoint slide presen-tation. It informs these high school freshmen and sophomores and their parents of their religious liberty rights in school: to pray, read the Bible or other religious text, to speak about their faith, wear religiously themed articles of clothing and even start an after-or before-school Bible club. So far, Matrisciano and Shaud have made presentations at the fol-lowing parishes: Good Shepherd, Andover; Our Lady Queen of Peace, Branchville; Our Lady of the Lake, Federation Knights of Columbus meeting on April 8 to generate in-terest from other councils in the Diocese and to sign their members up to train to become certified pre-senters. “Comments by many of our ninth-grade students and parents were that the presentation was in-formative and that, even though they know their rights are guaranteed in the Bill of Rights in the Constitution, they now have more confidence and feel better ‘armed’ with the facts,” said Phyllis Haarmann, Good Shepherd’s reading the Bible during a ‘free’ pe-riod’ or writing a paper on Jesus il-lustrated as examples of protected activities.” Clocking in at less than a half-hour, the presentation features PowerPoint slides accompanied by an audio recording. It informs stu-dents and their parents about their rights to religious expression in a non-threatening way in accord with to U.S. Department of Education regulations. The Knights presented the program which was initiated by STUDENTS, 2

Keeping The Flame Of Religious Liberty Alive

Michael Wojcik

U. S. Supreme Court Justice Alito emphasizes importance of defending religious freedom during recent talk to Catholics

MADISON A “hostile wind” has been kicking up in U.S. society that threatens not only people, who profess “traditional moral beliefs,” but also more broadly, the foundation of our freedom of religious expression as enshrined in the First Amendment to the Constitution — one of our basic liberties that many Founding Fathers championed in the early days of the nation.

On the evening of March 15, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito sounded that urgent warning in front of 300 local lawyers and concerned Catholics in his talk, “Religious Freedom in the Constitution and in Federal Law” at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. A Catholic, the guest speaker delivered an engaging hourlong presentation in the center’s auditorium as part of an ongoing lecture series by notable religious and legal minds about faith and the law. Sponsoring the talk was Advocati Christi, a diocesan fellowship of lawyers and judges, who are committed to the legal profession and the profession of their faith.

“One of those principles that we have always cherished in this country — one of those inalienable rights that were endowed on all of us — is the right to the free exercise of religion. Unfortunately, I think that we are heading into a period in which our dedication to religious liberty is going to be tested, and therefore all of us are going to be tested,” said Alito, who has served on the Supreme Court since 2006 after being appointed by President George W. Bush. “In the future, there will be pitched battles for religious freedom in courts and Congress, in state legislatures and town halls,” he said.

Raised in Trenton, Alito traveled from Washington, D.C. back to his home state to speak in the Diocese of Paterson. He has become one of the Supreme Court’s conservative voices in many cases of national importance, including such hot-button issues as same-sex marriage, partial- birth abortion and the exercise of religious conscience with regard to artificial contraception. He presented a talk — that referred to a wide range of Americans from George Washington to Bob Dylan — a few days before the U.S. Senate started hearings on March 20 for Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, also considered a conservative like Alito.

During his well received talk, Alito echoed the warning about religious freedom that he raised in his dissent in the 2015 landmark case of Obergefellv. Hodges, in which the court ruled by a 5-4 decision in favor of same-sex marriage. He wrote that he “feared that the decision would be used to vilify Americans, who were unwilling to assent to a new orthodoxy.”

“I assume that people of all beliefs will be able to whisper their thoughts in the recesses of their homes, but if they repeat those views in public, they will risk being labeled bigots and treated as such by governments, employers and schools,” Alito wrote in his dissent.

He told the St. Paul’s audience, “It is vital to our country that we evangelize our fellow Americans about the importance of religious freedom, because if we don’t, we won’t keep the flame of religious liberty alive in this country. The United States will not be the place that it has been — the country that we love so much,” he said.

The religious liberty guaranteed by the Constitution followed a considerable period of anti-Catholic bigotry in the original colonies before the Revolutionary War. But that prejudice softened, largely because the predominantly Protestant colonists fought alongside Catholics and because many Catholics supported the cause of independence. George Washington also promoted respect for all religions throughout his life — even declaring in his farewell address in 1796, “religion and morality were indispensable if the new republic is to thrive.”

Alito said that he first noticed anti- Catholic sentiment in the U.S. as a young boy in 1960 during the presidential campaign of John F. Kennedy, whose victory he said “lifted me up from the status of second-class American.”

In 2007, Alito experienced anti-Catholic bias personally, after he and other Catholic justices of the Supreme Court voted to uphold the ban on partial-birth abortion. A newspaper cartoon showed the Catholic justices wearing bishops’ miters, perpetuating “the old slander that Catholics could not be trusted or could not exercise independent judgment,” said the associate justice, who visited St. Paul’s with his wife Martha-Ann.

Before the presentation, Bishop Serratelli greeted Alito in the mansion of the Evangelization Center with Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization; Judge Andrew Napolitano, a Fox News commentator; and other lawyers and St. Paul’s staffers. There, the Bishop made a presentation to honor Andrew Anselmi, an Advocati Christi member. Anselmi was named a Knight of St. Gregory, a papal order bestowed on him by the Vatican.

“Our culture marginalizes God,” said Bishop Serratelli in his remarks before Alito’s presentation. “Justice Alito’s office calls him to make legal decisions that conform not only with the Constitution of our country, but also with God’s law open to all through human reason. We pledge our prayers for the vocation that God has given you for the good of our great nation,” he said.

Like all the talks in the series, the event started with a 5:30 p.m. Mass in St. Paul’s chapel, followed by 6 p.m. cocktail hour and conversation; a 7 p.m. presentation, including questions and answers; and an 8 p.m. gathering of fellows of the Outreach for Lawyers, including private dinner with the speaker and discussion. Lawyers are eligible to earn Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credits for attending.

After Alito’s talk, Father Manning mentioned several takeaways, including that “Our nation’s dedication to religious liberty requires our dedication to our own religion.”

“Justice Alito’s presentation was inspiring. He told us that it’s important as lawyers for us to evangelize by preserving religious liberty,” Anselmi said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Keeping+The+Flame+Of+Religious+Liberty+Alive/2742221/393995/article.html.

Newton Knights’ Program Informs Students Of Religious Liberty Rights

Michael Wojcik

NEWTON Since early this year, members of the Knights of Columbus Don Bosco Council No. 7784 have been delivering a serious message to Confirmation students throughout Sussex County: that schools — including public schools — are not “God-free” zones and that the law mandates them to permit students to express their faith freely.

During this current academic year, Rich Matrisciano and Bob Shaud of the Knights have been traveling to Diocesan parishes in Sussex County to host “Free to Speak,” a 30-minute PowerPoint slide presentation. It informs these high school freshmen and sophomores and their parents of their religious liberty rights in school: to pray, read the Bible or other religious text, to speak about their faith, wear religiously themed articles of clothing and even start an after- or before-school Bible club.

So far, Matrisciano and Shaud have made presentations at the following parishes: Good Shepherd, Andover; Our Lady Queen of Peace, Branchville; Our Lady of the Lake, Sparta, and most recently at St. Joseph here. In addition, the pair plans to speak at the next Paterson Federation Knights of Columbus meeting on April 8 to generate interest from other councils in the Diocese and to sign their members up to train to become certified presenters.

“Comments by many of our ninth-grade students and parents were that the presentation was informative and that, even though they know their rights are guaranteed in the Bill of Rights in the Constitution, they now have more confidence and feel better ‘armed’ with the facts,” said Phyllis Haarmann, Good Shepherd’s religious education director. “It was interesting to have real-life scenarios like prayer before an athletic event, reading the Bible during a ‘free’ period’ or writing a paper on Jesus illustrated as examples of protected activities.”

Clocking in at less than a halfhour, the presentation features PowerPoint slides accompanied by an audio recording. It informs students and their parents about their rights to religious expression in a non-threatening way in accord with to U.S. Department of Education regulations. The Knights presented the program which was initiated by Barbara Samuells, founder of Catholics for Freedom of Religion of the Diocese of Rockville Centre, N.Y., a lay ministry now active in five states.

“There is unnecessary confusion in our country about religion’s place in public schools….specifically, what students can say and do and share about their faith, church and religious practices,” according to the presentation, which cites specific examples of educators impinging on religious freedom: from barring students from writing about Jesus in reports to censoring mention of God from graduation speeches. “In fact, religious freedom in America protects your right to live your faith among your school friends in many appropriate school situations each day. The faith and religious practices you learn are not confined to home or church, but are protected in your public school as well,” it states.

Regrettably, most of these denials of religious rights are never challenged but should never happen — even for teachers, who want to express their faith in school. The presentation recommends law firms, such as the First Liberty Institute and Alliance Defending Freedom, which will represent students free of charge.

A few years ago, Matrisciano had helped found Faith, Family and Freedom, an organization based in the Diocese that was dedicated to preserving religious freedom. After the group disbanded, he asked the Don Bosco Council to form a committee dedicated to religious liberty. Matrisciano also reached out to one of his previous contacts, Samuells, who emailed him a pamphlet, “Free to Speak,” printed by the organization Gateways to Better Education. Samuells based the PowerPoint presentation mainly on material from the pamphlet.

Matrisciano and Shaud sought interest in “Free to Speak” from nearby pastors and approval from Bishop Serratelli and attended a training session about how to present the material at the Seminary of the Immaculate Conception on Long Island.

“God has been taken out of school. Society has convinced people that religion has no place in school. Some teachers and administrators deny religious liberties out of prejudice or an abundance of caution,” said Samuells, who noted that many parents who attend the presentation are surprised to learn about their rights. “We want to be lanterns of truth for the rights of religious freedom.”

Laurie DiCianni, Our Lady of the Lake’s religious education director, called the Knights’ presentation to the parish’s Confirmation students “well received.” The audience was balanced between public and Catholic school students, she said.

“It was presented simply and empowered students. They can question teachers. They have the right to express their faith in public settings,” said DiCianni, who was surprised to learn that Sparta High School has an after- school Bible group. “Also, Catholic school students, who do talk about faith in school, got to think about their social lives — how to live outside the walls of the school and be firm in expressing their faith.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Newton+Knights%E2%80%99+Program+Informs+Students+Of+Religious+Liberty+Rights/2742222/393995/article.html.

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