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THE 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL AND HEALTHCARE SYSTEM CALL FOR PRAYERS SUSSEX THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. PASSAIC MORRIS 14 APRIL 27, 2017 14 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Paterson’s St. Stephen Parish welcomes Bishop for worldwide celebration By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPORTER PATERSON This 6 8 PRO-LIFE CHASTITY MINISTRY IN DIOCESE BRINGS MESSAGE OF DIGNITY OF LIFE TO PHILIPPINES ORGANIZATION HONORING ST. PATRICK CLEANS UP ABANDONED CEMETERY 7 10-11 12-13 14 15-20 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS O BITUARIES Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS past Sunday, Catholics around the world marked Divine Mercy Sunday, a feast desig-nated by St. Pope John Paul II in 2001, which is held on the Second Sunday of Easter. The feast is based on the di-aries of a young Polish nun named St. Faustina Kowlaska and her en-counters with Jesus, who presented himself to her as Divine Mercy during the 1930s. St. Stephen Parish here, one of the most diverse communities in the Paterson Diocese, marked the feast with a tri-lingual Mass cele-brated in English, Polish and Span -ish April 23. Bishop Serratelli was main cele-brant of the Mass with Father D IVINE M ERCY S UNDAY Dariusz Kaminski, pastor of St. Stephen’s, and several diocesan priests as concelebrants. Some of the priests wore special vestments with the Divine Mercy image of Jesus. Father Kaminski has a special de-votion to Divine Mercy. It started during his formative years in Poland where he was born. St. Stephen Parish hon ors the devotion to Divine Mercy year-round with special holy hours, a pilgrim statue of the Blessed Mother that travels from parish-ioners’ homes and with the Eucharistic Missionaries of the Divine Mercy. At the start of the Divine Mercy Sunday Mass, Father Kaminski thanked Bishop Serratelli for cele-brating the Feast of Divine Mercy with the St. Stephen’s community DIVINE MERCY SUNDAY Bishop Serratelli celebrated Mass for Divine Mercy BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Sunday at St. Stephen Church in Paterson April 23. The Bishop is pictured meeting the Grinienko family. Natives of Poland, the children wore traditional Polish garb to mark the occasion which was designated by St. Pope John Paul II in 2001 and is held on the Second Sunday of Easter. each year. Then children of the parish, dressed in native garb pre-sented the Bishop with roses. In his homily, which he gave in both English and Spanish, the Bishop reflected on the day’s Gospel about St. Thomas, who doubted Jesus’ Resurrection until he could see and feel the wounds of Jesus. “God’s mercy changes unbeliev-ers into believers,” said the Bishop in his homily. “When the Apostles told Thomas of the Resurrection, he refused to believe. But even though he doubted that Jesus was raised from the dead, Jesus did not dismiss him. Jesus did not condemn him for his lack of faith. Rather a week later, Jesus appears before the same dis-CELEBRATION, 2 2017 DIOCESAN CATECHETICAL CONFERENCE ‘Speak about the Gospel’s great love story – between God and us’ By MICHAEL WOJCIK NEWS EDITOR MADISON Catechists, along with all other ‘ Catholics, need to speak openly about the rich theology, spirituality and morality of the Church but should also teach other people by emphasiz-ing the main love story at the heart of the Gospels: God’s everlasting love for us — so ab-solute that he sent his only Son to die for us — and our love for him. As evangelists, we are called to share that central love story with the world and invite people into a loving relationship with God, the internationally renowned Catholic speaker and author Chris Stefanick told a large gathering of local catechists, parish ministers and staff of the Paterson Diocese on April 22. That Saturday morning, Stefanick, who for-merly worshipped in the Diocese, presented his message that the faithful need to share God’s love for us with a world that has become increas-As a catechist, it’s great to see young people — little kids — become strong in their faith. … That faith and love spreads to families — young people and adults.’ — S HARON V ARGAS ingly hostile to religion. During 2017 Diocesan Catechetical Conference at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here, which attracted more than 300 catechists, clergy, religious and laity, Stefanick give them encouragement for their ministries and strategies on how to deepen their faith and in the people they encounter in the classroom and throughout their lives. The event also included remarks by Allan Wright, St. Paul’s academic dean, and Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and dioce-san vicar for evangelization, as well as an address by Bishop Serratelli, who spoke about the ultimate purpose of catechesis — religious conversion. Dan Ferrari, diocesan director of young adult ministry, sang worship songs and played his guitar throughout the conference, which concluded with Eucharistic Adoration in the early afternoon. In the second of his two keynote talks, Stefanick took to the stage in St. Paul’s auditorium to speak about the love story between God and us in the context of John 3:16. It states: “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” “Our faith teaches us not only, who God is but who we are — that we are worth dying for. CONFERENCE, 9

Paterson’s St. Stephen Parish Welcomes Bishop For Worldwide Celebration

Cecile Pagliarulo

PATERSON This past Sunday, Catholics around the world marked Divine Mercy Sunday, a feast designated by St. Pope John Paul II in 2001, which is held on the Second Sunday of Easter. The feast is based on the diaries of a young Polish nun named St. Faustina Kowlaska and her encounters with Jesus, who presented himself to her as Divine Mercy during the 1930s.

St. Stephen Parish here, one of the most diverse communities in the Paterson Diocese, marked the feast with a tri-lingual Mass celebrated in English, Polish and Span - ish April 23.

Bishop Serratelli was main celebrant of the Mass with Father Dariusz Kaminski, pastor of St. Stephen’s, and several diocesan priests as concelebrants. Some of the priests wore special vestments with the Divine Mercy image of Jesus.

Father Kaminski has a special devotion to Divine Mercy. It started during his formative years in Poland where he was born. St. Stephen Parish hon ors the devotion to Divine Mercy year-round with special holy hours, a pilgrim statue of the Blessed Mother that travels from parishioners’ homes and with the Eucharistic Missionaries of the Divine Mercy.

At the start of the Divine Mercy Sunday Mass, Father Kaminski thanked Bishop Serratelli for celebrating the Feast of Divine Mercy with the St. Stephen’s community each year. Then children of the parish, dressed in native garb presented the Bishop with roses.

In his homily, which he gave in both English and Spanish, the Bishop reflected on the day’s Gospel about St. Thomas, who doubted Jesus’ Resurrection until he could see and feel the wounds of Jesus.

“God’s mercy changes unbelievers into believers,” said the Bishop in his homily. “When the Apostles told Thomas of the Resurrection, he refused to believe. But even though he doubted that Jesus was raised from the dead, Jesus did not dismiss him. Jesus did not condemn him for his lack of faith. Rather a week later, Jesus appears before the same disciple in the upper room and this time Thomas is with him.”

The Bishop said, “With great love and compassion, Jesus offers Thomas, the doubter, the chance to do something he didn’t deserve. He offers him the chance to touch his wounds with his fingers and to put his hand in Jesus’ side. That great mercy of Jesus changed Thomas on the spot from an unbelieving disciple to a believing Apostle. And he uttered what is the highest profession of faith in the entire Gospel tradition. Touched by God’s mercy, he cried out ‘My Lord and My God.’ ”

“Today Mercy Sunday, we remember Thomas for what the Risen Lord did for him, which he also does for each of us. Jesus understands our misgivings, our hurts, our weakness, our doubts. He knows all too well our human condition. Jesus breaks through the locked doors of our hearts and makes us true believers of his Risen presence,” said the Bishop.

Because this year marks the 100th anniversary of the apparitions of the Blessed Mother before three shepherd children in Fatima, Portugal, Bishop Serratelli made an act of consecration to the Immaculate Heart of Mary with the parish community. He told the parishioners to continuously stay close to the Blessed Mother.

Following the act of consecration, an image of the Blessed Mother carried by ushers was processed around the church aisles and parishioners waved white cloths as “Ave Maria of Fatima” was sung.

At the close of Mass, Father Kaminski remembered Eva Serratelli, the Bishop’s mother, who passed away on April 27, 2014, which was the date Divine Mercy Sunday was marked that year.

Father Kaminski said, “Bishop Serratelli, please look for one second at the faces of our parishioners. Look at our eyes and look into our hearts. We wish you on this day of Divine Mercy Sunday, you could feel the same love and affection of our parishioners that you felt of your beloved mother — Mrs. Eva Serratelli.”

Bishop Serratelli thanked the community and said, “I want to express my sincere gratitude to this community — for your faith and devotion — and to your pastor, for being an inspiration to all of us.”

DIVINE MERCY SUNDAY

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Paterson%E2%80%99s+St.+Stephen+Parish+Welcomes+Bishop+For+Worldwide+Celebration/2773150/404375/article.html.

2017 Diocesan Catechetical Conference

Michael Wojcik

‘Speak about the Gospel’s great love story – between God and us’

MADISON Catechists, along with all other Catholics, need to speak openly about the rich theology, spirituality and morality of the Church but should also teach other people by emphasizing the main love story at the heart of the Gospels: God’s everlasting love for us — so absolute that he sent his only Son to die for us — and our love for him. As evangelists, we are called to share that central love story with the world and invite people into a loving relationship with God, the internationally renowned Catholic speaker and author Chris Stefanick told a large gathering of local catechists, parish ministers and staff of the Paterson Diocese on April 22.

That Saturday morning, Stefanick, who formerly worshipped in the Diocese, presented his message that the faithful need to share God’s love for us with a world that has become increasingly hostile to religion. During 2017 Diocesan Catechetical Conference at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here, which attracted more than 300 catechists, clergy, religious and laity, Stefanick give them encouragement for their ministries and strategies on how to deepen their faith and in the people they encounter in the classroom and throughout their lives.

The event also included remarks by Allan Wright, St. Paul’s academic dean, and Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization, as well as an address by Bishop Serratelli, who spoke about the ultimate purpose of catechesis — religious conversion. Dan Ferrari, diocesan director of young adult ministry, sang worship songs and played his guitar throughout the conference, which concluded with Eucharistic Adoration in the early afternoon.

In the second of his two keynote talks, Stefanick took to the stage in St. Paul’s auditorium to speak about the love story between God and us in the context of John 3:16. It states: “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.”

“Our faith teaches us not only, who God is but who we are — that we are worth dying for. We see the face of God looking back at us, when we look up at the stars and through our ups and downs in life. It’s a love story. God gave us a heart so that we can seek him,” said Stefanick, founder and president of Real Life Catholic, a nonprofit organization dedicated to reengaging a generation; a syndicated columnist; an author or co-author of several books; a regular on Catholic TV and radio; and a married father of six. “God calls us to imitate his love on Earth. Faith helps us see the dignity of the person in relation to God, including the poor and the homeless. We also need to talk about [hot-button moral] issues in the context of love — about having a relationship with God,” he said.

Catholicism gives people a source for objective moral truth in their decision- making in a world that increasingly rejects organized religion and moral “rules” and increasingly has embraced moral relativism — “my truth is just as valid as your truth.” Evangelization and religious formation has never been more critical in light of the fact that 25 percent of people consider themselves “nones” — without any religious affiliation. So Catholics need to be “joyful,” “lead by example” and “help people become bold Catholics for the world,” said Stefanick, now a resident of Denver, who belonged to and served as a peer minister of the youth ministry of St. Catherine of Bologna Parish, Ringwood, as he was growing up. The night before, he hosted “Reboot! Live!” multi- media faith presentation at St. Therese Parish, Succasunna.

Before Stefanick’s two keynotes, Bishop Serratelli told the audience that Church must continue to remain faithful to Christ’s charge that we “go and make disciples of all nations” — even in a society hostile to religion. He called catechesis an “ecclesial ministry” that involves “one disciple to another, handing down the faith, passing on sound moral principles and giving people the teachings of the Church in the common language of the Catholic faith over centuries.”

But today, many Catholics do not know the basics of the faith — not even an understanding of Eucharist as sacrifice and sacrament. He urged catechists to return to the practice of requiring students to memorize facts about the faith and focus on catechesis as lifelong formation for children and adults. The Bishop announced during the conference that he plans to assemble a list of 30 questions and answers about the basics of faith for distribution throughout the Diocese this summer for students to memorize.

“People need to understand faith — between what we know and understand and how we live the faith. The ultimate purpose of catechesis is conversion — moving away from evil and moving toward following Jesus. Catechesis puts young people in touch with Christ and excites their minds to seek him with the desire to unite with him, leading them to an intimate communion with Jesus in his Church,” said Bishop Serratelli, who noted that people can find a personal encounter with Jesus at Sunday Mass in the Eucharist.

Toward the conclusion of his address, Bishop Serratelli told the catechists: “Thank you for the work you do. Your work is essential for the work and survival of the Church.”

Father Manning spoke before Bishop Serratelli, offering a prayer that the Lord help transform the faith in catechists, as they teach other people the faith. He emphasized that Jesus calls catechists to “echo the Word of God, who is Jesus, faithfully.”

The audience included Stefanick’s parents, James and Mary, parishioners of St. Catherine’s, and Laura Haftek, youth ministry director at Our Lady of Consolation Parish, Wayne. She fondly remembers the featured speaker as a young man at St. Catherine’s, where she served as youth minister for many years, remarking, “Even back then, he was on fire [with love of Christ].” Another audience member was 20-year-old Sharon Vargas, a catechist for third- and fourth-graders at the Cathedral of St. John, Paterson. “As a catechist, it’s great to see young people — little kids — become strong in their faith. They are happy. That faith and love spreads to families — young people and adults,” Vargas said. “Chris reminded us that we must be people, who give the example of spreading the Gospel to the world.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/2017+Diocesan+Catechetical+Conference/2773155/404375/article.html.

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