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The Beacon The Beacon_June 1 2017 : Page 1

SUSSEX 4-5 DIOCESE TO HONOR 19 PRIESTS AT ANNUAL JUBILEE MASS JUNE 6 PASSAIC THE AWARD-WINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. MORRIS JUNE 1, 2017 B ICENTENNIAL C ELEBRATION 10 Order’s plans to mark 200th birthday of its founder include Mass with Bishop June 17 BY MICHAEL WOJCIK NEWS EDITOR INSTALLS PASTOR AT 8 BISHOP ST. GERARD’S IN PATERSON INSTALLS PASTOR AT 9 BISHOP ST. JOSEPH’S IN LINCOLN PARK 6-7 10 11 12-16 DO NOT DELAY  TIME SENSITIVE NEWS V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS MEMORIAL DAY MASS Bishop Serratelli delivers his homily during the annual diocesan Memorial Day Mass at Calvary Cemetery BEACON PHOTO | RICH GIGLI Mausoleum in Paterson May 29. During the Mass, all those who served in the armed forces and made the ultimate sacrifice to preserve the nation’s freedoms were remembered. For more photos and story, see page 16. Pope names Father Solanus Casey, cousin of Pequannock parishioners, ‘blessed’ BY MICHAEL WOJCIK NEWS EDITOR PEQUANNOCK Jim Murphy, who grew up as a parishioner of Holy Spirit Parish here, remembers when he was 18 and his father, Michael, made a rather startling prediction: “Someday, your cousin will become a saint.” Murphy’s cousin moved a step closer to his dad’s prediction when on May 4 Pope Francis named Capuchin Father Solanus Casey “blessed” — giving Murphy, now 80, hope that his third cousin will be canonized a saint in his lifetime. The Archdiocese of Detroit’s be-loved friar, Father Casey, had been named “venerable” by St. Pope John Paul II in 2007 and now has satisfied the requirements for be-atification as “blessed,” including the attribution of a miracle due to his intercession. Later this year, the Archdiocese of Detroit will host a Mass for the beatification for only the second man born in the U.S. to reach that designation. He is known for a ministry of caring for impoverished and sick people and listening to the concerns of count-less people, who sought his counsel. Father Casey’s cause would need the attribution of another mira-cle for his being declared a saint. “The entire family is excited about it. We hope that he becomes a saint in our lifetime,” said Jim Murphy, who now lives in Toms River, about his beloved cousin, who died on July 31, 1957 at 86. “The process toward sainthood at the Vatican is slow. We are still waiting. It’s coming closer. We look forward to it. If he is canon-ized a saint, I definitely will go to Rome,” he said. Father Casey’s first attributed miracle was a woman who suf-fered an incurable skin disease. She had stopped at Father Casey’s tomb during a visit to Detroit, and felt strong encouragement to ask for his intercession. She was healed instantly — a miraculous cure that doctors in her home country, in Detroit and in Rome, all verified as having no scientific explanation. Father Casey died in 1957 of skin disease, according to previously published press reports. “The beatification of Father Solanus Casey is an incompara-ble grace for the Church in the Archdiocese of Detroit and for the CASEY ON 3 MENDHAM The Sisters of Christian Charity at Mallinckrodt Convent have decided to “go big” in cele-brating the 200th birthday of their order’s founder, Blessed Pauline von Mallinckrodt. It will include an ar-ray of festivities in June and July to reconnect them with her exam-ple of Christ-centered concern for the poor that keeps inspiring them to promote her mission to the wid-er world. These birthday events will include an Eastern Province-wide Mass with Bishop Serratelli on Saturday, June 17 at 11 a.m. in the Chapel of Mary Immaculate at the convent here. “We wished to celebrate Blessed Pauline’s 200th birthday [which takes place on Saturday, June 3] to renew within ourselves the spirit and charism [spiritual gifts for the good of the Church] of our found-er and spread that charism to the people we serve,” said Sister Marie Pauline Demek, provincial council-or. “She began our congregation to glorify God and perform works of charity of any kind. The Sisters of Christian Charity minister in ed-ucation, healthcare, retreat work, social justice outreach and parish ministry. If we are able to do it, we will take it on,” she said. Bishop Serratelli will visit Mal-linckrodt Convent on Saturday, June 17, to serve as main celebrant and homilist at the Mass to celebrate the bicentennial of the birth of Blessed Pauline, who founded the Sisters of Christian Charity in Germany on Aug. 21, 1849. Attending will CELEBRATION ON 2

Pope Names Father Solanus Casey, Cousin Of Pequannock Parishioners, ‘Blessed

Michael Wojcik

PEQUANNOCK Jim Murphy, who grew up as a parishioner of Holy Spirit Parish here, remembers when he was 18 and his father, Michael, made a rather startling prediction: “Someday, your cousin will become a saint.” Murphy’s cousin moved a step closer to his dad’s prediction when on May 4 Pope Francis named Capuchin Father Solanus Casey “blessed” — giving Murphy, now 80, hope that his third cousin will be canonized a saint in his lifetime.

The Archdiocese of Detroit’s beloved friar, Father Casey, had been named “venerable” by St. Pope John Paul II in 2007 and now has satisfied the requirements for beatification as “blessed,” including the attribution of a miracle due to his intercession. Later this year, the Archdiocese of Detroit will host a Mass for the beatification for only the second man born in the U.S. to reach that designation. He is known for a ministry of caring for impoverished and sick people and listening to the concerns of countless people, who sought his counsel. Father Casey’s cause would need the attribution of another miracle for his being declared a saint.

“The entire family is excited about it. We hope that he becomes a saint in our lifetime,” said Jim Murphy, who now lives in Toms River, about his beloved cousin, who died on July 31, 1957 at 86. “The process toward sainthood at the Vatican is slow. We are still waiting. It’s coming closer. We look forward to it. If he is canonized a saint, I definitely will go to Rome,” he said.

Father Casey’s first attributed miracle was a woman who suffered an incurable skin disease. She had stopped at Father Casey’s tomb during a visit to Detroit, and felt strong encouragement to ask for his intercession. She was healed instantly — a miraculous cure that doctors in her home country, in Detroit and in Rome, all verified as having no scientific explanation. Father Casey died in 1957 of skin disease, according to previously published press reports.

“The beatification of Father Solanus Casey is an incomparable grace for the Church in the Archdiocese of Detroit and for the whole community of Southeast Michigan,” Detroit Archbishop Allen Vigneron said in a statement. “He is an inspiration to all us Catholics — and to all — of the power of grace to transform one’s life.”

Murphy’s brothers, who are Holy Spirit parishioners, Robert, 87, and Frank, 83, first heard about Father Casey’s latest designation as “blessed” from a cousin, who lives near Detroit. Then, Jim Murphy looked up more information about it on the Internet.

“Father Solanus loved and related to the poor and the sick. He would meet with people until all hours of the night — people, who would tell him their hardluck stories. Today, Father Solanus continues to help people, who pray to him. We hear the stories all the time. If a man loses his job and prays to him, he finds a job. I believe those stories,” said Frank Murphy, a parishioner of Holy Spirit, since 1960.

For years, members of the Murphy family, which originally included nine brothers, have supported the Father Solanus Guild in Detroit, where the humble, diminutive clergyman last served and died. The guild keeps Father Casey’s inspiring memory alive by educating the public about his life and work, by providing prayers and support and by working hard on his cause for sainthood, said Jim Murphy, a retired Pequannock police officer.

Over the years, Murphy family members have visited the guild headquarters and have kept tabs on Father Casey’s canonization cause. In July, several of them have attended a Mass at St. John the Baptist Church, New York City, to mark Father Casey’s death.

In 1924, Father Casey returned to Detroit, where he studied for the priesthood. He stayed at St. Bonaventure Seminary for 21 years as doorkeeper. He was ordained without faculties to celebrate Mass because the Capuchins didn’t think he had the mental capacity. But during those years, he packed notebooks with more than 6,000 requests for aid. Hundreds of petitioners reported successes.

Finally, 30 years after Father Casey’s death, Pope John Paul II declared the humble priest “venerable,” the first of three steps in the rigorous process toward sainthood.

Many in the Murphy family here also count many of the prayers on behalf of Father Casey “successes,” including medical miracles. “We talk to Father Solanus everyday. I believe he’s a saint,” Frank Murphy told The Beacon in 2007 when Father Casey was named “venerable.”

Years ago, Robert Murphy, retired from the Post Office, had given a Father Casey medal to the father of a 12-year-old local girl afflicted with leukemia. The day after, the father told Bob Murphy that her daughter didn’t need an operation they all feared she might, James Murphy told The Beacon.

“Coincidence? I don’t know. But we believe,” said Jim Murphy, a widower, whose traces Father Casey, born with the first name “Bernard,” back as the grandson of his grandfather’s sister, Margaret Sheils Murphy.

“This [Father Casey’s being named ‘blessed’] is fabulous news. We hope that Pope Francis waives the requirement of the second miracle to name him a saint more quickly,” Frank Murphy said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Pope+Names+Father+Solanus+Casey%2C+Cousin+Of+Pequannock+Parishioners%2C+%E2%80%98Blessed/2801727/413493/article.html.

Bicentennial Celebration

Michael Wojcik

Order’s plans to mark 200th birthday of its founder include Mass with Bishop June 17

MENDHAM The Sisters of Christian Charity at Mallinckrodt Convent have decided to “go big” in celebrating the 200th birthday of their order’s founder, Blessed Pauline von Mallinckrodt. It will include an array of festivities in June and July to reconnect them with her example of Christ-centered concern for the poor that keeps inspiring them to promote her mission to the wider world. These birthday events will include an Eastern Provincewide Mass with Bishop Serratelli on Saturday, June 17 at 11 a.m. in the Chapel of Mary Immaculate at the convent here.

“We wished to celebrate Blessed Pauline’s 200th birthday [which takes place on Saturday, June 3] to renew within ourselves the spirit and charism [spiritual gifts for the good of the Church] of our founder and spread that charism to the people we serve,” said Sister Marie Pauline Demek, provincial councilor. “She began our congregation to glorify God and perform works of charity of any kind. The Sisters of Christian Charity minister in education, healthcare, retreat work, social justice outreach and parish ministry. If we are able to do it, we will take it on,” she said.

Bishop Serratelli will visit Mallinckrodt Convent on Saturday, June 17, to serve as main celebrant and homilist at the Mass to celebrate the bicentennial of the birth of Blessed Pauline, who founded the Sisters of Christian Charity in Germany on Aug. 21, 1849. Attending will be priests from the parishes in which the sisters serve, staff persons, friends of the community, and the Companions of Pauline, lay people who have answered the call to proclaim Christ to the world by living out the charism of Blessed Pauline in their life. Afterward, the order will host a dinner in the motherhouse and present “My Soul Proclaims,” a presentation of the founder’s life, ministry and the charism as it is lived today by the congregation, Sister Marie Pauline said.

On the German-born nun’s 200th birthday, June 3, the sisters will kick off their celebrations with the fourth annual Run for a Nun 5k race, which starts at 9:30 a.m. in Lewis Memorial Park, Morristown. The event benefits the education of young women in the community in the initial stages of formation. Runners will receive a special black and white T-shirt that displays the face of Blessed Pauline, unlike shirts from previous years that had displayed an image of a nun running in sneakers. Registration opens at 8:30 a.m. and closes at 9:15 a.m. and costs $30 for adults and $10 for children. Walk-ins are welcomed, according Sister Bernadette, the order’s vocation and formation director.

After the run on June 3, the Sisters will continue celebrations of Blessed Pauline — who was born June 3, 1817 in Minden, Germany — on the grounds of the motherhouse in Mendham. They will start with a presentation on her life and ministry, showing her life caring for the poor and sick. Then, the sisters and young people will host a birthday party, complete with lunch, cupcakes and ice cream for the runners and children and adults in attendance from parishes and schools they serve. Festivities will continue with indoor games — including a scavenger hunt and “Pin the Bow on Blessed Pauline” — and a 4 p.m. closing Mass celebrated by Benedictine Father Hilary O’Leary, formation director at St. Mary’s Abbey, Morristown,

“We want to celebrate the birthday of Blessed Pauline, because she was the ultimate expression of how someone can live for and love God’s people. She spoke about the needs of the poor but then found ways to bring them God’s help, both spiritually and concretely, and alleviate their sufferings,” Sister Bernadette said.

The sisters’ birthday festivities continue into July, when they participate in Response 200: “three days of prayer, study, creativity and community, rooted in the charism of Blessed Pauline.” On the final day, the sisters have invited Sister Anna Shwanz of the German Province to visit and to speak about “In Response to God’s Call,” her book about the congregation’s history from Blessed Pauline’s death on April 30, 1881 to the present day. Four different sessions have been scheduled on various days throughout the month.

“Response 200 will explore the stages of Blessed Pauline’s life, her spirituality, our history and our current realities,” Sister Marie Pauline said.

The birthday celebrations, called Pauline 200, grew from the work of a planning committee that began last October to update information about Blessed Pauline, which can be found on the Eastern Congregation’s web site, www.scceast.org, and about the congregation in brochures, bookmarks and on their website. The sisters and the Companions of Pauline received a booklet, which contains reflections from Scripture and Blessed Pauline’s writings, from Ash Wednesday to Pentecost. The sisters also assembled biographical sketches to be published in parishes’ Sunday bulletins, Sister Marie Pauline said.

The Eastern Province represents sisters serving in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Ohio, West Virginia and New Orleans. The global congregation now ministers on four continents: North and South America, Europe and Asia, according to the Eastern Congregation’s web site.

Among those local Sisters of Christian Charity still inspired by Blessed Pauline is Sister Joan Daniel Healy, diocesan chancellor and delegate for religious, who was taught by the sisters.

“There was something about the sisters that just attracted me and helped to foster my vocation to religious life. I now know that it was the charism that Blessed Pauline left us: love for the Eucharist, a deep prayer life, love for the poor, the willingness to take risks when necessary and much more,” Sister Joan Daniel said. “She was woman on a mission for Christ and the Church. To this day her charism still attracts young women to religious life and through her intercession we pray for the perseverance and the grace that others may continue to follow in her footsteps.”

“There was something about the sisters that just attracted me and helped to foster my vocation to religious life. I now know that it was the charism that Blessed Pauline left us: love for the Eucharist, a deep prayer life, love for the poor, the willingness to take risks when necessary and much more.”

— Sister Joan Daniel Healy

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Bicentennial+Celebration/2801728/413493/article.html.

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