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SUSSEX THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. PASSAIC MORRIS 7 NET TEAM COMPLETES YOUTH RETREATS IN DIOCESE APRIL 6, 2017 B LESSING OF N EW M ONSTRANCE 19 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard RELIGIOUS IN DIOCESE MARK WORLD DAY FOR CONSECRATED LIFE Chatham parishioners experience God’s presence At first Mercy Night, Eucharistic Adoration held at St. Patrick Church in Chatham 10 BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI 11 BISHOP CONFIRMS TEENS FROM TWO PARISHES IN BOONTON Bishop Serratelli blesses a new monstrance at the Shrine of St. John Paul II/Holy Rosary Parish in Passaic during his pastoral visit April 2 where he was the principal celebrant of Mass for the Fifth Sunday in Lent. The Mass also marked the 12th anniversary of the death of St. John Paul II on April 2, 2005. The new monstrance, made possible through the generous contributions of parishioners, will be used to commemorate the upcoming 100th anniversary of the parish, which will be celebrated next year. For story, more photos, see page 9. By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR 6 12-13 14-19 19 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS W HAT T O D O Women encouraged to live their Catholic beliefs at diocesan Women’s Conference By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR MADISON Carrie Lupini’s heart sank, as she saw a police cruiser pulling into the driveway of her Indiana home. She would learn that her eldest son, Anthony, who was home on Christmas break from Purdue University, had suffered a head in-jury in a car accident — so serious that he had been airlifted to a hospital an hour away. “I was in fear and panic. Yet, during this dark time, I felt God’s love. He was in control,” said Lupini, a married mother of six and director of Birthright of Kokomo, Ind. On April 1, she re-counted the story of her son’s grave injury — one of the greatest moments of crisis in her life — during the fourth-annual diocesan Women’s Conference at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. “By the third day, doctors said that there was nothing they could do. I felt enfolded in the love and peace of the Almighty Father. At his bedside, I whispered in Anthony’s ear, ‘Take Mary’s hand.’ I saw the Blessed Mother hold up We women have the power ‘ to shape the moral dimension of the culture. … God created us to be witnesses to the rest of the world and light a fire. Go out and be that fire for God.’ — K ATE B RYAN her hand as my son peacefully passed from this life to the next. Today, I’m not bitter, angry or sad. Instead, I serve God with joy,” she said. The hearts of many of the 250 women, who attended the conference last Saturday, broke for Lupini, as she told her story — a mother’s worst nightmare that might have shattered the faith of many mothers, but brought her to rely on the grace of God. Guided by the theme, “Today’s WOMEN’S CONFERENCE, 2 CHATHAM Last Friday evening, about 80 can-dles softly lit the altar at St. Patrick Church here, which held a monstrance that contained the Blessed Sacrament. The soft sounds of songs with titles, such as “I Come to You, Jesus,” filled the inside of the church, sung by more than 50 parishioners who sought the peace and joy of God during Mercy Night: Eucharistic Adoration that had a different style and format. On March 31, St. Pat -rick’s hosted the first Mercy Night held in the Paterson Diocese — a multifaceted evening that featured rites, rituals and spiritual activities to help participating Catholics find peace, happiness, for-giveness and inspiration. The Emmanuel Com mu -nity, an international Cath -olic community that re-cently started a group in the New Jersey area, sponsored the event — similar to many of the Mercy Nights it has held locally in the Newark Archdiocese. Activities included powerful personal testi-monies of faith and opportunities to receive the Sacrament of Penance from participating priests and to speak about their own concerns in life with seminarians from Immaculate Conception Seminary, South Orange, including two from the Paterson Diocese. Some seminarians helped coordinate Mercy Night, which helped St. Patrick’s parishioners, such Walt Voytus, feel GOD’S PRESENCE, 4 A F IRST F OR T HE P ATERSON D IOCESE

Chatham Parishioners Experience God’s Presence

Michael Wojcik

At first Mercy Night, Eucharistic Adoration held at St. Patrick Church in Chatham

CHATHAM Last Friday evening, about 80 candles softly lit the altar at St. Patrick Church here, which held a monstrance that contained the Blessed Sacrament. The soft sounds of songs with titles, such as “I Come to You, Jesus,” filled the inside of the church, sung by more than 50 parishioners who sought the peace and joy of God during Mercy Night: Eucharistic Adoration that had a different style and format.

On March 31, St. Pat - rick’s hosted the first Mercy Night held in the Paterson Diocese — a multifaceted evening that featured rites, rituals and spiritual activities to help participating Catholics find peace, happiness, forgiveness and inspiration. The Emmanuel Community, an international Catholic community that recently started a group in the New Jersey area, sponsored the event — similar to many of the Mercy Nights it has held locally in the Newark Archdiocese.

Activities included powerful personal testimonies of faith and opportunities to receive the Sacrament of Penance from participating priests and to speak about their own concerns in life with seminarians from Immaculate Conception Seminary, South Orange, including two from the Paterson Diocese. Some seminarians helped coordinate Mercy Night, which helped St. Patrick’s parishioners, such Walt Voytus, feel presence of God.

“Mercy Night brought me peace, during this Lenten season,” said Voytus, who is active at St. Patrick’s as a lector, extraordinary minister of Holy Communion and a choir member. “The music was special. It was easy to sing and had a warm and welcoming tone. The testimonies were heartfelt and real. I felt the Lord’s presence and mercy in the Body of Christ, which was right there in the Blessed Sacrament. That was a comfort,” he said.

Mercy Night kept the focus on Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, while offering other spiritual activities, which started with testimonies about Confession and Adoration by two seminarians: Tim Eck of the Metuchen Diocese and Christian Scalo of the Newark Archdiocese. They spoke about “what the Lord has done in their lives” with the aim of encouraging the faithful here to “see Adoration in a new light or go to Confession,” said Lynx Soliman, a Newark seminarian and an Emanuel Community member who served as master of ceremonies for the evening.

The faithful were invited to come before the Lord by dropping their intentions in what was called the Worry Box, where they placed their concerns. They also could take a slip of paper that displayed an inspirational phrase of Scripture from the Joy Box. In addition, congregants could avail themselves to Confession — administered by Father Christopher Barkhausen, St. Patrick’s parochial vicar, and two priests from Immaculate Conception, said Andrew Dutko, one of the seminarians from the Diocese now serving at St. Patrick’s, who assisted in coordinating Mercy Night.

Around St. Patrick Church, participating seminarians gathered in what are called Mercy Groups. Worshippers were invited to visit them throughout the evening to speak about their joys and concerns in any level of detail that they wished. Then, seminarians joined the faithful “in prayer and discernment toward that concern,” Dutko said.

“People told us what was in their hearts. We talked to them. Sometimes, we broke open the Word. Then, we prayed with them,” Dutko said.

Peaceful music filled the inside of St. Patrick’s throughout Mercy Night, accompanied by Maggie Hanson, the parish’s music minister, who played organ, and a guitarist, as the congregation sang. Written by members of the Emanuel Community throughout the world, the songs included “Great is Your Mercy,” which intones to God, “Wonderful Your love…I will never cease to sing your praise.” The evening also included moments of silence to keep the focus on the Blessed Sacrament, she said.

“It is beautiful music. The songs are simple, but not simplistic They are joyful. When you hear the melodies, you want to sing. The lyrics speak of Jesus as a personal friend, not in the abstract,” said Hanson, who noted that members of St. Patrick’s choir joined the seminarians in singing for Mercy Night. “The evening was so inspirational and filled with such joy.”

A longtime member of the Emanuel Community, Soliman called the music “Catholic praise” that “honors Our Lady and is very Eucharistic.”

Sponsoring Mercy Night was the Emmanuel Community, an international Catholic community that the Holy See has recognized as a “Public Association of the Faithful” and consists of lay people, priests, religious and seminarians, which seek to follow Christ in the service of the Church’s mission. In 1972, Pierre Goursat and Martine Laffitte-Catta founded the organization in France, inspired by experiences of a Charismatic Renewal prayer group, according to press reports.

“The Emmanuel Community has been a force of evangelization in France,” said Soliman, who listed the pillars of the community: Eucharistic Adoration, compassion and evangelization. “They remind people of their call and duties as members of the Church to work to renew the Church and society.”

Mercy Night concluded with Benediction and the Blessed Sacrament being placed in repose. Dutko said that he enjoys these evenings, because they bring him “out with the people.”

“We get to pray with the people we will serve one day as priests,” said Dutko, who requested that Mercy Night be brought to St. Patrick’s. “It gives us seminarians hope and gives us expectations of how we will act as priests.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Chatham+Parishioners+Experience+God%E2%80%99s+Presence/2756178/398416/article.html.

Women Encouraged To Live Their Catholic Beliefs At Diocesan Women’s Conference

Michael Wojcik

MADISON Carrie Lupini’s heart sank, as she saw a police cruiser pulling into the driveway of her Indiana home. She would learn that her eldest son, Anthony, who was home on Christmas break from Purdue University, had suffered a head injury in a car accident — so serious that he had been airlifted to a hospital an hour away.

“I was in fear and panic. Yet, during this dark time, I felt God’s love. He was in control,” said Lupini, a married mother of six and director of Birthright of Kokomo, Ind. On April 1, she recounted the story of her son’s grave injury — one of the greatest moments of crisis in her life — during the fourth-annual diocesan Women’s Conference at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley- Ellard here. “By the third day, doctors said that there was nothing they could do. I felt enfolded in the love and peace of the Almighty Father. At his bedside, I whispered in Anthony’s ear, ‘Take Mary’s hand.’ I saw the Blessed Mother hold up her hand as my son peacefully passed from this life to the next. Today, I’m not bitter, angry or sad. Instead, I serve God with joy,” she said.

The hearts of many of the 250 women, who attended the conference last Saturday, broke for Lupini, as she told her story — a mother’s worst nightmare that might have shattered the faith of many mothers, but brought her to rely on the grace of God. Guided by the theme, “Today’s Catholic Woman: Feminine, Faithful, Fearless,” the conference also welcomed two other speakers: Kate Bryan, a writer and communications director of the American Principles Project in Washington, D.C., and Sister of Christian Charity Ann Marie Paul, director of the Passaic Neighborhood Center for Women in Passaic. Here, women of all walks of life — from teens to seniors — had the opportunity to network, ask the speakers questions and pray, during Eucharistic Adoration that concluded the conference — the biggest so far — which was held in St. Paul’s auditorium.

Many of the women clutched tissues as Lupini continued her story, which included another tragic turn. Her third child, Gabriel, had been diagnosed with schizophrenia at 14, after many sleepless nights when he heard voices in his head. He took his own life in their home while the rest of the family was attending Mass at their parish church, she said with her voice quivering with emotion.

“I was hysterical, I cried to the heavens,” said Lupini, who also told the audience that the devil had taunted her, calling her a “terrible mother.” “In Confession, Jesus shone the light of truth before the merciful gaze of God. The more I went to Jesus, the more he healed me and the closer we became. Only Jesus can heal,” she said.

Lupini’s powerful talk closed a series of three talks at the conference, which was sponsored by the Diocesan Office of Family Life, led by director, Eni Honsberger. Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization, opened the event with a greeting that encouraged the women to “claim the strength and peace that comes from faith,” when facing life’s challenges. Keaton Douglas, a parishioner of St. Thomas, Sandyston, served as host of the conference. Bishop Serratelli was not able to attend but greeted the women in a short video that was shown at the event.

“I’m thrilled to know that you will be spending the day taking about motherhood in all of its beautiful aspects — not simply the physical aspects but the more spiritual as well. I’m happy that you are taking out time, devoting some energy, attention and prayer to this great vocation,” the Bishop said in the video.

In her passionate and humorous talk, Sister Ann Marie reflected on “spiritual motherhood” — a term she once disliked because she considered it “a consolation prize for women, who were not biological mothers.” But over time, she saw it as “a response to God’s call to be open to receiving, birthing and nursing the grace that brings life,” she said.

“The world needs spiritual motherhood, now more than ever,” said Sister Ann Marie, who urged the women to follow the example of the Blessed Mother, “find the courage to respond to God’s will for them,” pass down their life and faith stories to the younger generations and contemplate Jesus in the Eucharist, “which will lead us to be the spiritual mothers that we need to be.”

The conference kicked off its three presentations with Bryan, who issued a call to women to meet God’s call with the “fearlessness and grace” as shown by Mary as the Mother of God. Last year, Bryan demonstrated that faith-filled courage by writing a column that appeared in the Washington Post under the daring headline, “I’m a 32-yearold virgin and I’m living the feminist dream.” In it, she revels that she feels freedom in not having to worry about an unplanned pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases. Being single also has given Bryan the time to live her life to the fullest — living abroad, earning a master’s degree, embarking on mission trips, tying new activities and spending time with friends and family, she said.

“Seize every opportunity. Focus on where God is calling you at this time in your life,” said Bryan, who noted that she has been dating and hopes for marriage and family one day. “We women have the power to shape the moral dimension of the culture. We are a vital part of the Church and society. God created us to be witnesses to the rest of the world and light a fire. Go out and be that fire for God,” she said.

Father Manning led Eucharistic Adoration, accompanied by two members of St. Paul’s Music Ministry: Marisel Rodriguez, who sang, and Dan Ferrari, director of diocesan Young Adult Ministry, who played guitar. Earlier in the conference, they performed Ferrari’s song “Every Day, I.”

Afterward, Dee Wayland of Notre Dame of Mount Carmel Parish, Cedar Knolls, a recent retiree from the real estate business, said that the “diverse group of women of faith” at the conference had greatly encouraged her. “Sister Ann Marie gave us the tools to communicate our faith in everyday life and to see people as Jesus, which is helping with my Lenten prayer to become less judgmental,” Wayland said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Women+Encouraged+To+Live+Their+Catholic+Beliefs+At+Diocesan+Women%E2%80%99s+Conference/2756184/398416/article.html.

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