Background Image

The Beacon The Beacon_012617 : Page 1

SUSSEX THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. PASSAIC MORRIS 4 CHRISTMAS SHARING FUND CLOSES; TOPS 2015 AMOUNT JANUARY 26, 2017 9 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Faithful rally to support legislation to protect child in womb from pain By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER CELEBRATING CATHOLIC SCHOOLS WEEK IN THE PATERSON DIOCESE S1-S16 8 BISHOP MAKES PASTORAL VISIT TO WAYNE PARISH 6-7 V IEWPOINT 9 W HAT T O D O 10-16 C LASSIFIEDS DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS TRENTON Across the nation, as people of good-will prepare to head to Washington, D.C. tomor-row for the 44th annual March for Life to protect life in the womb, Catholics here in New Jersey are rallying support to protect the unborn by urg-ing state lawmakers to pass the Pain Capable Unborn Child Protec tion Act (A3452/S2026). If passed, the act would ban abortions Babies performed after 20 of post-fertiliza-feel pain in weeks tion and require that the womb. babies born alive dur-ing abortions be given The public the same medical care needs to get as infants born prema-Mounting evi-behind this turely. dence by prominent legislation.’ physicians and scien-tific journals concludes — F RANK T INARI that the child in the womb at the 20-week stage can feel pain. Frank Tinari, a parishioner of Holy Family in Florham Park, along with his wife, Barbara, have been active in pro-life ministry. They have been trying to get the word out about the pending leg-‘ YOUNG ADULT MASS Bishop Serratelli (center) elevates the Host during the Consecration at a Mass BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI that he celebrated on Jan. 22 for the Young Adult Group of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard, Madison. Concelebrants included Father Pawel Tomczyk (left), a St. Paul’s faculty member, and Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization. Many of the young adults participated in the annual liturgy with the Bishop. RALLY FOR LIFE, 5 MADISON Bishop Serratelli was the main cele-brant and homilist on Sunday, Jan. 22 during a Mass for the Young Adult Group of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. He reminded the young people that “to be disciples of Jesus means that we are connected other people.” Young adults and other faithful, who are as-Bishop celebrates Mass with young adults Annual event held at St. Paul Inside the Walls By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR Popularity of Catholic-based web library grows By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER Movies, books on-demand be viewed on televisions when connected to these devices. FORMED is an Augustine Institute Production and also features faith-based programming for children and also of-fers programs in Spanish. Several parishes in the Paterson Diocese are subscribed to FORMED using the website for its religious education and faith formation programs. It also is available for parishioners to use for their personal faith enrichment. At Assumption Parish here, many parish-ioners have been navigating through for two FORMED, 3 mission to evangelize, technology is providing new ways of spreading the Gospel message. And the new evangelization is embracing tech-nology in all its forms. There are a growing number of parishes in the Diocese that have embraced the tech-nology for evangelization offered by FORMED, a web library with movies, audio, books and programs with leader guides and videos. The content is available on-demand for computers, smart phones and tablets and the website can MORRISTOWN As the Diocese continues its sociated with St. Paul’s, gathered in the evange-lization center’s auditorium for the annual Mass, which was concelebrated by Father Paul Manning, its executive director and Diocesan vicar for evan-gelization; Father Kevin Corcoran, the Bishop’s priest-secretary: and Father Pawel Tomczyk, a St. Paul’s faculty member. Many members of the Young Adult Group, including its music ministry, participated in the well-attended 11 a.m. liturgy for the Third Sunday of Ordinary Time. They joined together afterward for a reception in the mansion of the center. In his homily, Bishop Serratelli noted that the story of Jesus calling two sets of brothers — Andrew and Peter and James and John — at the Sea of Galilee to become his disciples (Mt 4: 12-23), that Sunday’s Gospel — shows that we must practice our faith in Christ in an interrelational way. “The way we live our lives has an affect on others, even in terms of their eternal salvation. As disciples, we are here to influence one another. Like Jesus, we need to become ‘fishers of men.’ To come to Jesus means that we need to enter into a new relationship with everyone else,” said DISCIPLES OF JESUS, 2

Faithful Rally To Support Legislation To Protect Child In Womb From Pain

Cecile Pagliarulo

TRENTON Across the nation, as people of goodwill prepare to head to Washington, D.C. tomorrow for the 44th annual March for Life to protect life in the womb, Catholics here in New Jersey are rallying support to protect the unborn by urging state lawmakers to pass the Pain Capable Unborn Child Protec tion Act (A3452/S2026).

If passed, the act would ban abortions performed after 20 weeks of post-fertilization and require that babies born alive during abortions be given the same medical care as infants born prematurely. Mounting evidence by prominent physicians and scientific journals concludes that the child in the womb at the 20-week stage can feel pain.

Frank Tinari, a parishioner of Holy Family in Florham Park, along with his wife, Barbara, have been active in pro-life ministry. They have been trying to get the word out about the pending legislation. Tinari, professor emeritus at Seton Hall University in South Orange, publishes a monthly newsletter on life issues, which is sent to many parishes in the state and can also be found on the Diocesan website.

“We are building public consciousness about the act so people can support the bill,” he told The Beacon. “We need to let this be known to the public so we change the hearts and minds of the people. Babies feel pain in the womb. The public needs to get behind this legislation. A lot of ground work has already been done to let people know about it.”

N. J. Right to Life had planned a rally Jan. 23 to support the legislation at the State House here but due to the prediction of heavy rains from nor’easter, the rally was cancelled. The N.J. Right to Life plans on hosting future events to bring attention to the Pain Capable Unborn Child Protection Act. At the current time, there is no date set for state legislators to vote on the bills.

Seeing that the legislation is passes, is part of the 20-20 Project, a collaborative effort by N.J.pro-life groups. The organization is hosting many social media campaigns to raise awareness about the act. The 20-20 Project is encouraging people to use the hashtag #theyfeelpain on social media. The 20- 20 Project and Lifenet NJ are also offering car magnets and stickers to spread the message.

According to a fact sheet on the N.J. Pain Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, in addition to the substantial medical evidence that the child in the womb feels pain by 20 weeks, a child born prematurely at that age can survive and thrive with appropriate medical care and treatment. The U.S. is just one of seven countries that allows elective abortions after 20 weeks. The others are: China, North Korea, Vietnam, Singapore, Canada and the Netherlands. Since 2010, 14 states have enacted similar legislation to the New Jersey bill. This bill is modeled after H.R. 36, the Federal bill by the same name.

Early in December, Marie Tasy, executive director of N.J. Right to Life, spoke to lawmakers in Trenton about the bill as did physicians and legislators supporting it. “At 20 weeks post fertilization, a baby in the womb is 11 inches long and almost one pound and looks like a small newborn,” she said. “The baby has fully formed fingerprints and tiny little toenails and is able to do somersault and suck a thumb — and feel pain.”

To support the bill, N.J. pro-lifers can visit the N.J. Right to Life’s website, which directs visitors to contact their elected officials.

[Information: www.NJRTL.org or babiesinthewombfeelpain.com.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Faithful+Rally+To+Support+Legislation+To+Protect+Child+In+Womb+From+Pain/2695119/379214/article.html.

Bishop Celebrates Mass With Young Adults

Michael Wojcik

MADISON Bishop Serratelli was the main celebrant and homilist on Sunday, Jan. 22 during a Mass for the Young Adult Group of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. He reminded the young people that “to be disciples of Jesus means that we are connected other people.”

Young adults and other faithful, who are associated with St. Paul’s, gathered in the evangelization center’s auditorium for the annual Mass, which was concelebrated by Father Paul Manning, its executive director and Diocesan vicar for evangelization; Father Kevin Corcoran, the Bishop’s priest-secretary: and Father Pawel Tomczyk, a St. Paul’s faculty member. Many members of the Young Adult Group, including its music ministry, participated in the well-attended 11 a.m. liturgy for the Third Sunday of Ordinary Time. They joined together afterward for a reception in the mansion of the center.

In his homily, Bishop Serratelli noted that the story of Jesus calling two sets of brothers — Andrew and Peter and James and John — at the Sea of Galilee to become his disciples (Mt 4: 12- 23) , that Sunday’s Gospel — shows that we must practice our faith in Christ in an interrelational way.

“The way we live our lives has an affect on others, even in terms of their eternal salvation. As disciples, we are here to influence one another. Like Jesus, we need to become ‘fishers of men.’ To come to Jesus means that we need to enter into a new relationship with everyone else,” said

Annual event held at St. Paul Inside the Walls Bishop Serratelli in his homily. “To be a disciple means that we are connected to other people and we are to bring others to him with us,” he said.

At the start of the liturgy, Dan Ferrari, St. Paul’s minister to young adults, ages 23-39, welcomed Bishop Serratelli, declaring, “We are honored to have the Shepherd of the Diocese joining us today to celebrate Mass with us.”

The annual Young Adult Mass, which started in 2015, represents a sort of homecoming to St. Paul’s for Bishop Serratelli, whose vision for a diocesan evangelization center — the first such facility of its kind in any in the U.S. — came to fruition in 2011.

Home to a multifaceted array of programs, St. Paul’s established its Young Adult Group as one of its first outreaches. Hundreds of young adults come through St. Paul’s doors to participate in different activities — many reaching significant milestones, such as marriages, births of children and as for a few, answering God’s call to religious life. While many young adults are active at St. Paul’s, the ultimate goal is for them to be active in their local parishes. The Young Group regularly gathers for Mass at 11 a.m. on Sundays at the evangelization center.

At the end of the Mass, Bishop Serratelli told the congregation — which included young adults, some of their parents, visitors and members of St. Paul’s Advisory Board — that Catholics should highlight the “gift of the Eucharist,” when evangelizing the Catholic faith to other people, including those, “who are doubting or confused.”

Before the Bishop’s closing remarks, Father Manning thanked Bishop Serratelli for celebrating Mass at St. Paul’s. “When the Bishop visits us, he connects us with time — with the unbroken chain to the Apostles [of the early Church] — and with space — to all of the Church, because he is united to the successor of Peter in Rome,” Father Manning said. “When the Bishop visits us, he is a disciple visiting fellow disciples, a father visiting his family and a friend visiting his friends. We thank you for that, Bishop,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Bishop+Celebrates+Mass+With+Young+Adults/2695120/379214/article.html.

Popularity Of Catholic-Based Web Library Grows

Cecile Pagliarulo

MORRISTOWN As the Diocese continues its mission to evangelize, technology is providing new ways of spreading the Gospel message. And the new evangelization is embracing technology in all its forms.

There are a growing number of parishes in the Diocese that have embraced the technology for evangelization offered by FORMED, a web library with movies, audio, books and programs with leader guides and videos. The content is available on-demand for computers, smart phones and tablets and the website can be viewed on televisions when connected to these devices. FORMED is an Augustine Institute Production and also features faith-based programming for children and also offers programs in Spanish.

Several parishes in the Paterson Diocese are subscribed to FORMED using the website for its religious education and faith formation programs. It also is available for parishioners to use for their personal faith enrichment.

At Assumption Parish here, many parishioners have been navigating through for two years. “FORMED is a wonderful website that has been called a ‘Catholic Netflix,’ ” Msgr. John Hart, pastor, said. “Our parish invested in FORMED so that each of us might grow in our relationship with Jesus Christ and in our desire to share our faith with others, especially those closest to us.”

Parishioners can prepare for Mass each week by watching an insightful five-minute video on the Sunday readings, enjoy movies as a family that are both faith-filled and entertaining, and they can help children grow in faith and character through engaging children’s materials.

Msgr. Hart said, “It’s very worthwhile. There are many great Catholic movies, including many on the saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and St. Theresa of Calcutta.

St. Mary Parish in Dover started using FORMED when the parish was seeking to revamp its RCIA program. The parish presented “Symbolon: Knowing the Faith,” which explains the essentials of the Catholic Church. Presented in 10 sessions, some were about the journey of faith, the Bible, the mystery of Jesus’ death and resurrection and the Holy Spirit.

SOLT Father Derek Anderson, pastor of St. Mary’s, said, “We began using Symbolon last year for our RCIA as an evangelization tool. We had people from our RCIA classes attend all 20 sessions and they showed up again for classes this year because they got so much out of it and they wanted to learn even more about the faith. There’s a hunger for getting to know the faith out there.”

Following a successful year using FORMED with its RCIA program, St. Mary’s has developed and expanded its faith formation program hosting sessions on the Bible and the Blessed Mother. More than 70 people attended the first faith formation class and during the summer on average 55 people would attend faith formation sessions to enrich their faith.

St. Mary’s has also reached out to its parents with children in its religious education classes through “Symbolon” to help the parents get more knowledge about the faith and assist in their child’s faith journey in addition to their own. The parish also plans to engage married couples with “Beloved,” a marriage enrichment program and “Reborn,” a program for parents preparing for their child’s baptism. “Catholicism,” a popular video series by Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron of Los Angeles, is also available on FORMED, which is being used by many parishes of the diocese through the DVD series.

Father Anderson said, “People have been really surprised by FORMED. We found something that works for us. There has been a lot of excitement for the sessions with people coming to the meetings early and asking if they can help set up. Some people bring brownies to share. The people find themselves growing intellectually in their faith and a lot of their questions are being answered.”

Cheryl Avery, a parish consultant and servant leader for FORMED, teaches religious education at St. Francis de Sales Parish in the McAfee section of Vernon, where she is a parishioner. The Sussex County parish has also used FORMED in its religious education and faith formation programs.

“Pope Francis reminded us not to be afraid of technology and we have to be where the people are in order to evangelize the faith,” she said.

A parish subscription is $1,680 for the year, which offers unlimited access to 100s of Catholic movies, books, talks and programs at the parish or at a parishioner’s home or mobile devices. While the cost may be a concern for some parishes, Father Anderson said, “We’ve been blessed to have couples and families donate to have FORMED available for the community. They’ve seen that it’s something worthwhile to have in the parish and have donated to make it available again.”

Anyone interested in learning more about FORMED can contact Avery. “FORMED is meant for every person in the parish,” she said. “It is meant for people to watch at home, on their smart Tvs, computers, smart devices, phones. It is also meant to be used for parish programs, adult catechesis/faith formation, RCIA, for parents and teachers of religious education, in short, it’s for everyone. You could have a family movie night or a discussion group before or after Mass.”

Father Anderson said, “Parishioners and those who are learning about the faith see that it’s worth their time and are growing close to each other. Our RCIA candidates are being prepared to enter into our parish community. They are getting to know one another and the sacraments they are about to receive. FORMED has been a great way to evangelize the faith.”

[Information: Cheryl Avery, (973) 670-8550, or chmcavery@aol.com.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Popularity+Of+Catholic-Based+Web+Library+Grows/2695123/379214/article.html.

Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here