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The Beacon The Beacon_Jan.19 2017 : Page 1

SUSSEX THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. PASSAIC MORRIS 3 BISHOP’S COLUMN: ‘FAITH AND FAMILY: AN IRREPLACEABLE BOND’ JANUARY 19, 2017 10 8 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard P ATRIOTIC R OSARY YOUNG LEADERS Bishop Serratelli made a pastoral visit to St. Ann Church here, Saturday BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI THREE NEW EAGLE SCOUTS AT POPE JOHN XXIII HIGH SCHOOL With the presidential inauguration tomorrow, St. Francis parishioners join in prayer for unity, love of their country By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER evening Jan. 14, serving as main celebrant and homilist of the vigil Mass for the Second Sunday in Ordinary Time. Attending the Mass were young people preparing for Confirmation, who participated in the ALPHA retreat, which the parish hosted that weekend. Above, retreat leaders Sarah Vojta and Rachel Hoffman present the Offertory Gifts to the Bishop, assisted by Deacon Len Deo. For story and more photos of the pastoral visit, see page 9. 16 BISHOP MAKES PASTORAL VISIT TO HAWTHORNE PARISH 6-7 8 10 11-15 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS V IEWPOINT Y OUTH W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS Young adults at Wayne parish explore options for engaging in social justice By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR WAYNE Do you want to help build a better world for the poor — one founded on Catholic social teaching? Last week, members of the Young Adult Ministry of Our Lady of Consolation (OLC) Parish here learned several life-affirming ways to bring the Gospel to the least among us, including swinging a hammer to build a house for Habitat for Humanity. That suggestion felt familiar to some of the young people, including Amanda Sweetman. The night of Jan. 12 found Sweetman and her fellow Young Adult Ministry members, sitting on a cluster of comfortable couches and chairs in the Fellowship Room of the newly refurbished OLC Ministry Center to listen to talks given by several Catholics, who are engaged in social jus-tice programs. They spoke about serving a range of outreaches — from serving meals to the home-less at Eva’s Village in Paterson to helping to build homes, schools and clinics for the poor in Ecuador — as part of the 10-year-old ministry’s Topics on Tap series. The speakers gave thought-provoking ideas to the young adults, many of whom have been involved in social justice, either with the ministry or the parish. “Building houses for Habitat for Humanity is fun. We dug ditches. We built walls, raised them up and then insulated and painted them,” said Richard Greco, who founded OLC’s Social Justice Ministry and got it involved in Habitat for Humanity of Paterson, which included volunteer “sweat equity” by 24-year-old Sweetman. “It’s re-warding. I wanted to do something for somebody in hopes that he or she will pay it forward. That’s how we can practice our faith — taking what we hear in the Gospels at Mass and putting it into action,” he said. In the middle of Greco’s easy, almost conver-sational talk, Sweetman interjected, calling her work with Habitat a “great experience, actually working — nailing floors and painting rooms.” “I felt like I was doing something,” Sweetman said. “I loved the work and the people who re-ceived the houses needed them. They were so appreciative,” she said. Greco sat in a chair in middle of the young adults and also told them about the Social Justice Ministry’s monthly visit to Eva’s Village to feed the homeless, which has included Young Adult TOPICS ON TAP, 2 HASKELL When a group of parishioners at St. Francis of Assisi Parish here prayed the rosary recently, they recited each of the 50 states in the United States of America. From Alabama to Wyoming, each rosary bead was a Hail Mary said for the state. Their intentions focused on praying for the United States as the country pre-pares for the inauguration of its newly-elected presi-dent, Donald Trump, who This is the will be sworn in tomor-second row, Jan. 20, as the na-country I tion’s 45th president. The patriotic rosary is have called part of a nine-month no -home … and vena for the consecration of the nation to the Bles -like any sed Mother at the north-home, you ern Passaic County parish, pray for your located in the Haskell sec-tion of Wanaque. The nove-family. The na will be held on the first patriotic Saturday of each month, rosary allows with Mass at 11 a.m. fol-me to pray for lowed by the novena and this country, rosary. Father Greg Golba, ad-which I now ministrator of the parish, call my said, “The idea came from the people of this parish family.’ who wanted to pray for — F ATHER the country, especially with G REG G OLBA the inauguration of the new president and the up-coming new administration. We need to pray for unity.” The St. Francis parish family considers itself ‘ PATRIOTIC ROSARY, 4

Patriotic Rosary

Cecile Pagliarulo

With the presidential inauguration tomorrow, St. Francis parishioners join in prayer for unity, love of their country

HASKELL When a group of parishioners at St. Francis of Assisi Parish here prayed the rosary recently, they recited each of the 50 states in the United States of America. From Alabama to Wyoming, each rosary bead was a Hail Mary said for the state. Their intentions focused on praying for the United States as the country prepares for the inauguration of its newly-elected president, Donald Trump, who will be sworn in tomorrow, Jan. 20, as the nation’s 45th president.

The patriotic rosary is part of a nine-month no - vena for the consecration of the nation to the Bles - sed Mother at the northern Passaic County parish, located in the Haskell section of Wanaque. The novena will be held on the first Saturday of each month, with Mass at 11 a.m. followed by the novena and rosary.

Father Greg Golba, administrator of the parish, said, “The idea came from the people of this parish who wanted to pray for the country, especially with the inauguration of the new president and the upcoming new administration. We need to pray for unity.”

The St. Francis parish family considers itself a patriotic one. Many of the parishioners have served the nation in the U.S. armed forces or now have loved ones serving in the military. There are also many civil servants who work in the community who are members of the parish.

“They take every opportunity to pray for the country they love and to express their gratitude to all who place themselves in harm’s way to preserve our freedom,” Father Golba said. “There is always a strong presence at events honoring our nation’s heroes, including the annual 9/11 Memorial Service.”

The patriotic rosary, which was created by Caritas of Birmingham, a Catholic mission in Alabama, is prayed throughout the country at cloistered convents, inside the Pentagon and many military bases. This special devotion features a “Prayer to Heal Our Land” and uses patriotic reflections from past presidents in U.S. history. Prayer intentions are said for the conversion of the country, the presidency, the U.S. Supreme Court, the Senate and House of Representatives, governors, county and municipal offices.

Linda O’Connell, who attended the patriotic rosary, said, “There’s a love for the country and a deep spirituality among the parishioners at St. Francis. The patriotic rosary with Mass and the novena is a wonderful idea. Mass is the highest form of prayer and tradition says that the Blessed Mother gave us the rosary to pray when we need her guidance.”

The presidential election left the country divided. As a result, the parishioners of St. Francis wanted to host the patriotic rosary to pray for unity and peace for the country and the world.

Father Golba, who is native of Poland and is currently applying for U.S. citizenship, said, “This is the second country I have called home and I now call it my first home and like any home, you pray for your family. The patriotic rosary allows me to pray for this country, which I now call my family.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Patriotic+Rosary/2690293/377892/article.html.

Young Adults At Wayne Parish Explore Options For Engaging In Social Justice

Michael Wojcik

WAYNE Do you want to help build a better world for the poor — one founded on Catholic social teaching? Last week, members of the Young Adult Ministry of Our Lady of Consolation (OLC) Parish here learned several life-affirming ways to bring the Gospel to the least among us, including swinging a hammer to build a house for Habitat for Humanity. That suggestion felt familiar to some of the young people, including Amanda Sweetman.

The night of Jan. 12 found Sweetman and her fellow Young Adult Ministry members, sitting on a cluster of comfortable couches and chairs in the Fellowship Room of the newly refurbished OLC Ministry Center to listen to talks given by several Catholics, who are engaged in social justice programs. They spoke about serving a range of outreaches — from serving meals to the homeless at Eva’s Village in Paterson to helping to build homes, schools and clinics for the poor in Ecuador — as part of the 10-year-old ministry’s Topics on Tap series. The speakers gave thoughtprovoking ideas to the young adults, many of whom have been involved in social justice, either with the ministry or the parish.

“Building houses for Habitat for Humanity is fun. We dug ditches. We built walls, raised them up and then insulated and painted them,” said Richard Greco, who founded OLC’s Social Justice Ministry and got it involved in Habitat for Humanity of Paterson, which included volunteer “sweat equity” by 24-year-old Sweetman. “It’s rewarding.I wanted to do something for somebody in hopes that he or she will pay it forward. That’s how we can practice our faith — taking what we hear in the Gospels at Mass and putting it into action,” he said.

In the middle of Greco’s easy, almost conversational talk, Sweetman interjected, calling her work with Habitat a “great experience, actually working — nailing floors and painting rooms.”

“I felt like I was doing something,” Sweetman said. “I loved the work and the people who received the houses needed them. They were so appreciative,” she said.

Greco sat in a chair in middle of the young adults and also told them about the Social Justice Ministry’s monthly visit to Eva’s Village to feed the homeless, which has included Young Adult Ministry members. He and other presenters spoke about “Reaching Out: Putting Faith into Action” — the latest presentation of the five-year-old Topics on Tap. The series provides a comfortable setting for single and married adults, from 18- to 35-years-old, to come together to discuss what it means to be Catholic and to socialize with other Catholic young adults, said Mary Ann Miller, who founded the ministry with husband, Jeffrey.

After Greco’s talk, Thomas and MaryAnne Deregibus spoke about their involvement with OLC’s outreach to San Pablo, an impoverished village in Ecuador. For years, the ministry has built — and stocked — a high school, day-care centers, a health clinic and houses for families. The outreach, incorporated as the non-profit Ecuador Quilt, partners with a local priest to determine the people’s needs, they said.

“People are shocked by the living conditions, when people first visit. But the villagers are happy people. They have the important things: family, faith and community,” Thomas Deregibus said. “OLC is getting involved in making people’s lives better. It’s a nice feeling that we did something for someone, who can’t do anything for us. This is an ongoing commitment that we hope the parish will continue for a long time,” he said.

This year, the Young Adult Ministry plans to get involved in Ecuador Quilt’s annual sixweek Lenten Soup Night. The group will gather one evening to prepare the soup.Parishioners then pick up containers of the sacrificial meatless soups — at the parish each week for a $10-15 donation and enjoy them with family or friends. Proceeds benefit the outreach, Mary Ann Miller said.

Michael Pressler, a junior at William Paterson University, Wayne, spoke about organizing yearly bowling/tricky tray events to benefit St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, which treats children with cancer — inspired by his grandmother, who died of cancer. So far, he has raised $33,000 in contributions — more and more each year — by asking more merchants to donate prizes and more people to attend the event, he said.

“I’m doing something to help people and people want to help me help other people,” said Pressler, who enjoys connecting one-onone with the business owners he solicits.

The audience that night included Maeghan Fengya of the new Young Adult Ministry at Annunciation Parish, also in Wayne, who seemed impressed by the faithfilled actions of the presenters. OLC’s adults will be working with Annunciation’s young adults as they establish their ministry, Mary Ann Miller said.

“You have been working to bring God into people’s lives — bringing the Gospel to Wayne, Paterson or Ecuador,” said Fengya, who has traveled to other areas of the U.S. to help the poor as part of the national outreach Catholic Heart Work Camp.

Held twice yearly, Topics on Tap included talks by Xaverian Father Carl Chudy, provincial superior of the Xaverian Missionaries at the Provincial House in Wayne, on “Christians, Muslims and Jews: Finding Common Ground,” and Father Louis Scurti, a retired priest, about keeping and maintaining the commitment of the millennial generation to parish life. Father Michael Lombardo, OLC’s pastor, also hosted a question- and-answer session with the young adults, Mary Ann Miller said.

Topics on Tap rounds out a full schedule of events for the Young Adult Ministry, which the Millers founded 10 years ago. Its activities center on promoting social, spiritual and service opportunities and include trivia nights at local restaurants, movie nights at local theaters and potluck dinners. Over the past few months, the ministry has taken up residence in the Fellowship Room of OLC’s Ministry Center, which formerly housed the parish school. Helping to lead the ministry are young adults, Marie Reddy and Patrick Trentecost, Mary Ann Miller said.

“There are many people out there who are lost. We want to bring young people home [to the Church] and help them build a relationship with Jesus. The Lord has a master plan to help us grow in faith and reach out in action,” Mary Ann Miller said.

After the meeting, 26-year-old Andrew Noblett, who works as a mail clerk, but aspires to become a graphic designer, told The Beacon that the talks inspired him to be more involved in social justice and “gave me something to shoot for.”

Also impressed with the night’s speakers, Sweetman, a neonatal nurse at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center, Paterson, said she loves “having a good time” in the Young Adult Ministry with “so many wonderful people.”

“We share stories [about life] and bounce ideas off each other. We help each other stay grounded and faith based,” Sweetman said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Young+Adults+At+Wayne+Parish+Explore+Options+For+Engaging+In+Social+Justice/2690294/377892/article.html.

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