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The Beacon The Beacon_January 12 2017 : Page 1

SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. 2 BISHOP ANNOUNCES CLERGY RETIREMENT, ASSIGNMENTS MORRIS JANUARY 12, 2017 POVERTY AWARENESS MONTH 12 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard In the U.S., 43 million people live in poverty By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER 2 PATERSON FAITHFUL HELP WELCOME CARDINAL TOBIN AS ARCHBISHOP OF NEWARK STEM PROJECT BECOMES LIFE-CHANGING EVENT AT ST. ANTHONY SCHOOL IN HAWTHORNE 8 8-9 10-11 12 13-16 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS ‘ CLIFTON January is Poverty Awareness Month, a month long initiative to bring forth the ongoing issue facing more than 43 million people living in poverty in the United States. Poverty affects people of all races, backgrounds and ages. In the state of New Jersey almost one million people live in poverty. Addressing the issue is a mission of the U.S. Bishop’s Catholic Campaign for Human Develop -ment (CCHD), who launched Poverty USA, the domestic anti-poverty program. The CCHD seeks to educate and promote understanding about poverty and its root causes. Its mission goes be-yond helping those living in poverty but pre -venting poverty, stopping the cycle of poverty among families and helping families help True mercy, themselves. To be con-living in pover-the mercy God sidered ty, a family of four con-gives to us sisting of two adults and two children has to and teaches make below $24,300 a us, demands year. Diocesan Catholic justice, it Charities is no stran ger demands that to serving those living the poor find in poverty. Its Catholic Family and Commu -the way to be nity Services (CFCS) provides services in the poor no poorest of communities longer.’ in all three counties of — P OPE F RANCIS the diocese. Christine Barton, executive director of CFCS, said, “While we live in a state that claims the second highest median household income in the U.S., in the communities that CFCS serves, our clients earn a fraction of this: barely enough to get by.” In two cities that CFCS serves, a large popu-lation faces poverty. In Passaic County, in the city of Paterson nearly one-third of its residents live in poverty and in Morris County, in Dover, more than 20 percent live in poverty. POVERTY USA, 5 BEACON PHOTO JOE GIGLI FEAST OF THE EPIPHANY Bishop Serratelli censes the Nativity in Christ the King Church in New Vernon, where he made a pastoral visit Jan. 8 and celebrated Mass for the Feast of the Epiphany, also known as Three Kings’ Day. For more photos, see page 5. Diocese to host Rachel’s Vineyard retreat Offers healing environment for women, men following abortion By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER CLIFTON If there’s anything the Jubilee Year of Mercy made Catholics worldwide realize, it is that God’s love and mercy is unconditional and always there for anyone who wants to receive it. In November, Pope Francis reiterated this mes-sage especially to those women and men affected by an abortion allowing priests to absolve the sin of abortion in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. “There is no sin that God’s mercy cannot reach and wipe away when it finds a repentant heart seeking to be reconciled with the Father,” the pope said. For those women and men, who find them-selves seeking to renew, rebuild and redeem hearts broken by an abortion, the Paterson Diocese is once again hosting a Rachel’s Vineyard weekend retreat. It will offer a supportive, con-fidential and non-judgmental environment where women and men can express, release and rec-oncile painful post-abortive emotions to begin the process of restoration, renewal and healing. The retreat will be held on the weekend of Jan. 27 to 29 within the Paterson Diocese. For those seeking information, all calls will be confidential. Since 2003, the Diocese has hosted Rachel Vineyard retreats and Marie Ryan, former dioce-san director of the Office of Family Life, continues to serve in this ministry of post abortion heal-ing. Some of the symptoms faced by those who experienced an abortion include depression, nightmares, anxiety, and withdrawal from family and even suicidal thoughts. Rachel’s Vineyard al-lows participants to talk about those experiences and find forgiveness. The retreats are led by trained team members, which include priests, lay ministers and counselors to provide one-on-one spiritual and psychological support. “Those who come to these retreats are so wounded by abortion,” Ryan said. “At the retreat, they find themselves in the hands of people that are empathetic and compassionate and they are able to begin the process of healing.” An important focus of the retreats is the return to the Sacraments — especially the Sacrament of Reconciliation. A priest will be present at the retreat to listen to the confessions of retreatants. Father Marc Mancini, pastor of St. Therese Parish in Succasunna, has been involved in RACHEL’S VINEYARD, 7

In The U.S., 43 Million People Live In Poverty

Cecile Pagliarulo

CLIFTON January is Poverty Awareness Month, a month long initiative to bring forth the ongoing issue facing more than 43 million people living in poverty in the United States. Poverty affects people of all races, backgrounds and ages. In the state of New Jersey almost one million people live in poverty.

Addressing the issue is a mission of the U.S. Bishop’s Catholic Campaign for Human Develop - ment (CCHD), who launched Poverty USA, the domestic anti-poverty program. The CCHD seeks to educate and promote understanding about poverty and its root causes. Its mission goes beyond helping those living in poverty but pre - venting poverty, stopping the cycle of poverty among families and helping families help themselves. To be considered living in poverty, a family of four consisting of two adults and two children has to make below $24,300 a year.

Diocesan Catholic Charities is no stranger to serving those living in poverty. Its Catholic Family and Community Services (CFCS) provides services in the poorest of communities in all three counties of the diocese.

Christine Barton, executive director of CFCS, said, “While we live in a state that claims the second highest median household income in the U.S., in the communities that CFCS serves, our clients earn a fraction of this: barely enough to get by.” In two cities that CFCS serves, a large population faces poverty.

In Passaic County, in the city of Paterson nearly one-third of its residents live in poverty and in Morris County, in Dover, more than 20 percent live in poverty.

‘True mercy, the mercy God gives to us and teaches us, demands justice, it demands that the poor find the way to be poor no longer.’ — POPE FRANCIS

Since the great recession that began in 2008, CFCS has seen its numbers grown significantly in providing basic services to thousands and thousands of people due to job losses, long-term unemployment and home foreclosures. These services include emergency assistance such as food, rental/mortgage assistance, utility bill payments, temporary shelter and even medical bill and prescription assistance.

“CFCS provides emergency and community support services that can help clients who are facing utility shut-off or eviction for rent non-payment. The increase in clients served mirrors that of the basic needs programs nearly doubly each year from 2012 to present,” said Barton.

Children and seniors account for a significant number of those affected by poverty. In New Jersey, 15.6 percent of children and 7. 9 percent of seniors were living below the poverty line in 2015 according to the CCHD.

According to CFCS 2015 annual report, “Children are most adversely affected by poverty and CFCS strives to mitigate the impact of poverty on the child’s long term success through quality preschool education and after school and summer programs.” In 2015, CFCS youth programs served 5,297 children.

In the counties of the Diocese, Passaic, Morris and Sussex, 3,294 seniors were also supported by CFCS through services such as adult day care, recreation activities, transportation services, chore and home repair programs and Meals on Wheels.

One of the important goals of Poverty Awareness Month is the prevention of poverty and helping families sustain themselves. CCHD was established in 1969 to empower groups of poor and low-income people to address the root causes of poverty in their communities. According to the CCHD, the root causes of poverty are lack of education, single-parent homes, mental and physical disabilities and racial injustice. Another factor is the economic cycle. With the current economy, a minimum wage earns a full-time worker only about $15,000 a year. Health insurance is unaffordable to many including the 48 million people who lacked coverage in 2012. Housing has become inaccessible to low-income people and more than eight million pay more than half their annual income for rent or mortgage payments.

The CCHD has many youth programs for parishes to teach young people about poverty whether it is to live in solidarity and assist those in poverty and to break the cycle of poverty for youth already at risk. The CCHD has also provided more than 9,000 grants to self-help organizations led by poor persons.

Quoting Pope Francis, the CCHD posted this message by the pope: “Charity that leaves the poor person as he is, is not sufficient. True mercy, the mercy God gives to us and teaches us, demands justice, it demands that the poor find the way to be poor no longer.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/In+The+U.S.%2C+43+Million+People+Live+In+Poverty/2685138/375734/article.html.

Diocese To Host Rachel’s Vineyard Retreat

Cecile Pagliarulo

Offers healing environment for women, men following abortion

CLIFTON If there’s anything the Jubilee Year of Mercy made Catholics worldwide realize, it is that God’s love and mercy is unconditional and always there for anyone who wants to receive it.

In November, Pope Francis reiterated this message especially to those women and men affected by an abortion allowing priests to absolve the sin of abortion in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. “There is no sin that God’s mercy cannot reach and wipe away when it finds a repentant heart seeking to be reconciled with the Father,” the pope said.

For those women and men, who find themselves seeking to renew, rebuild and redeem hearts broken by an abortion, the Paterson Diocese is once again hosting a Rachel’s Vineyard weekend retreat. It will offer a supportive, confidential and non-judgmental environment where women and men can express, release and reconcile painful post-abortive emotions to begin the process of restoration, renewal and healing. The retreat will be held on the weekend of Jan. 27 to 29 within the Paterson Diocese. For those seeking information, all calls will be confidential.

Since 2003, the Diocese has hosted Rachel Vineyard retreats and Marie Ryan, former diocesan director of the Office of Family Life, continues to serve in this ministry of post abortion healing.

Some of the symptoms faced by those who experienced an abortion include depression, nightmares, anxiety, and withdrawal from family and even suicidal thoughts. Rachel’s Vineyard allows participants to talk about those experiences and find forgiveness. The retreats are led by trained team members, which include priests, lay ministers and counselors to provide one-on-one spiritual and psychological support.

“Those who come to these retreats are so wounded by abortion,” Ryan said. “At the retreat, they find themselves in the hands of people that are empathetic and compassionate and they are able to begin the process of healing.”

An important focus of the retreats is the return to the Sacraments — especially the Sacrament of Reconciliation. A priest will be present at the retreat to listen to the confessions of retreatants.

Father Marc Mancini, pastor of St. Therese Parish in Succasunna, has been involved in Rachel’s Vineyard retreats for 10 years. “It’s an important ministry that allows good women and good men to experience healing and also the healing they receive in the Sacrament of Reconciliation,” he said. “They gain support within the context of the program and hear the stories of others going through a similar experience.”

The retreats can range from anywhere between four participants to as many as 12 to 14. Those who come to the retreats are of all ages and backgrounds.

While it’s mostly women, who attend these retreats, men have attended as well. Ryan recalls the first phone call she has ever received about Rachel’s Vineyard more than a decade ago was from a man. She said, “Abortion affects men too. I remember that very first phone call from someone seeking help. It was from a husband who said, ‘My wife needs you.’ ”

In addition to self-reconciliation and reconciliation from God, the retreat helps begin the healing process to other relationships. Many times, parents or significant others are the ones who pressure a pregnant woman to get an abortion.

Another aspect of the retreat is creating a connection among the unborn child and parent, which allows the letting go of the guilt and the healing to begin. Father Mancini said, “The retreat provides a connection between the parents and the child they chose not to have. Often times, parents believe once the choice is made, the life they gave up is not here with us anymore. But as Catholics we believe these babies live in heaven. The retreat enables the connection between the parents and the children.”

Post-abortion trauma differs from other traumas because it’s most often kept a secret and people don’t share their pain with others. Because of this, follow up meetings are held after the Rachel Vineyard retreats.

“Darkness is being lifted from these people who experienced the pain of abortion. The poorest of the poor are those with no spiritual connection. Those mothers, that let their children go through abortion find that connection again through Rachel’s Vineyard,” said Ryan.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Diocese+To+Host+Rachel%E2%80%99s+Vineyard+Retreat/2685141/375734/article.html.

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