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The Beacon The Beacon_01052017 : Page 1

SUSSEX THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. PASSAIC MORRIS 2 BISHOP ANNOUNCES CLERGY APPOINTMENTS JAN. 5, 2017 12 2 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard H APPY N EW Y EAR BISHOP VISITS NETCONG PARISH ON NEW YEAR’S EVE Faithful across the diocese plan trip to Washington for annual March for Life By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI ‘T HE P OWER OF O NE ’ During Mass on New Year’s Day at St. Brendan/St. George Church in Clifton, Joseph Christianson plays the flugelhorn. Bishop Serratelli made a pastoral visit to the parish Jan. 1 where he was the principal celebrant of the Mass, which marked the Solemnity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God. Story, more photos on page 6. 8 SEMINARIANS GATHER FOR CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION WITH BISHOP 10-11 V IEWPOINT 12 W HAT T O D O 13-16 C LASSIFIEDS DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS DPD purchases eight new cars thanks to Partners in Faith donors By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER OAK RIDGE The Department for Persons with Disabilities (DPD), a Catholic Charities agency of the Paterson Diocese, is beginning the New Year with eight big reasons to be thankful. Due to the generosity of the thou-sands of faithful Catholics in the Paterson Diocese, the agency re-cently received a check from Partners in Faith, the Diocesan capital and endowment cam-paign. With the check, DPD pur-chased eight new Toyota Prius’ to transport residents living in its group homes. These vehicles are used mostly for clients’ medical visits but also to get them around commu-nity and take them to weekend Masses and other religious programs. Tom Barrett, diocesan coordinator of spe-cial projects, said, “Partners in Faith came to the rescue. DPD desperately needed to replace 10-year-old vehicles used for trans-porting clients on medical visits. The cars that the agency has been using had high mileage and were frequently breaking down with repair bills mounting.” Previously, DPD placed most of its new vehicle purchases into its contract from the State. However, the State is no longer fund-ing vehicles and this funding must be paid through fund-raising, donations or grants. In prior years, DPD was able to secure funding from private or public grants, but this time, they could not find any funding sources for this need. Bishop Serratelli said, “I am grateful to the parishioners of our Diocese who came together as people of faith to help their brothers and sisters. Our De -partment for Persons with Disa -bilities does a tremendous job in serving the needs of the most vulnerable among us. Knowing that Partners in Faith is there for them by strengthening and enhancing this ministry is something we can all be proud of. This is just one example of the great REASONS TO BE THANKFUL, 9 CLIFTON It has been more than four decades since the Supreme Court, in its Roe v. Wade decision on Jan. 22, 1973, made abortion legal. But since that infamous date, pro-life advocates have never given up the fight. Still valiant and courageous in their efforts, they are gearing up for the annual March for Life in Washington, D.C., which will be held Friday, Jan. 27. This year’s theme is “The Power of One.” Because of the logistics of the Presidential Inau gu ration this year on Jan. 20, the 2017 March for Life will be held five days after the Jan. 22, 1973 anniversary date. Dr. Mary Mazzarella, consult-ant for the diocesan Respect Life Office, who is a retired pedia-trician said, “It is inspiring to me to see the hundred of thousands of people who brave the cold to state why they are pro-life.” As early as 6 a.m. buses will leave from locations all across the Diocese in Passaic, Morris and Sussex counties for the five-hour bus trip to Washington. At some parishes, the day will begin with the celebration of Mass as spiritual preparation for the March for Life. Once all the busses arrive in Washington, Father Michael Rodak, pastor of Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish in West Milford, will celebrate Mass at 12:10 p.m. in St. Peter Church on Capitol Hill. This is a meeting point for many of the diocesan buses traveling to Washington. Father Rodak, who is also diocesan pilgrimage director, encourages people to attend the Mass. “With the church three blocks from Capitol Hill, it’s so important we come together in prayer and pray in the shadows of the Congressional offices, where legislation begins. It’s so sig-nificant we do this on a day dedicated to being pro-life,” said Father Rodak. The March begins at 1 p.m. following a rally, which takes place on the grounds of the Washington Monument. From there, marchers will trek down Constitution Avenue to Capitol Hill, walking past the U.S. Capitol building. The March ends outside the Supreme Court, directly behind the March For Life ’17 POWER OF ONE, 4

DPD Purchases Eight New Cars Thanks To Partners In Faith Donors

Cecile Pagliarulo

OAK RIDGE The Department for Persons with Disabilities (DPD), a Catholic Charities agency of the Paterson Diocese, is beginning the New Year with eight big reasons to be thankful. Due to the generosity of the thousands of faithful Catholics in the Paterson Diocese, the agency recently received a check from Partners in Faith, the Diocesan capital and endowment campaign.

With the check, DPD purchased eight new Toyota Prius’ to transport residents living in its group homes. These vehicles are used mostly for clients’ medical visits but also to get them around community and take them to weekend Masses and other religious programs.

Tom Barrett, diocesan coordinator of special projects, said, “Partners in Faith came to the rescue. DPD desperately needed to replace 10-year-old vehicles used for transporting clients on medical visits. The cars that the agency has been using had high mileage and were frequently breaking down with repair bills mounting.”

Previously, DPD placed most of its new vehicle purchases into its contract from the State. However, the State is no longer funding vehicles and this funding must be paid through fund-raising, donations or grants. In prior years, DPD was able to secure funding from private or public grants, but this time, they could not find any funding sources for this need.

Bishop Serratelli said, “I am grateful to the parishioners of our Diocese who came together as people of faith to help their brothers and sisters. Our Department for Persons with Disabilities does a tremendous job in serving the needs of the most vulnerable among us. Knowing that Partners in Faith is there for them by strengthening and enhancing this ministry is something we can all be proud of. This is just one example of the great work being done through Partners in Faith. I thank all who worked as volunteers for the campaign, as well as those who are continuing to financially support it through the fulfillment of their pledges. Our Church is blessed by your generous spirit.”

Having reliable cars is a necessity for DPD. Last year, the agency transported its residents more than 52,000 miles for more than 2,200 community medical visits, which include annual check-ups, specialists, emergencies and dental visits.

“PIF has helped Catholic Charities assist people with disabilities live in the community through our group homes and have access to healthcare in a community setting rather than in an institutional setting,” said Scott Milliken, executive director of DPD.

DPD values its mission to allow its clients to live in group homes in the community which has proven to be beneficial for those with disabilities. DPD’s group homes provide a family atmosphere and loving environment for its clients.

The purchase of these new vehicles shows Partners in Faith at work. The capital and endowment campaign held its active fundraising phase from 2012 to 2013 with a campaign goal of $40 million. Through the hard work and efforts of pastors, priests and lay leaders, more than $61 million was pledged. The pledge fulfillment will continue through 2018.

Tim Potter, diocesan director of development, said, “The active phase of the Partners in Faith campaign was conducted in 2013. Many people made one-time gifts while others made pledges to give over time and continue to faithfully follow-through on their pledges. Even though Partners in Faith began several years ago — its positive impact on the lives of so many continues today. It is great to see how the developmentally disabled clients now have reliable vehicles to take them to their regular doctor visits. What many of us take for granted becomes a challenging task for those with special needs. Thanks to the generosity of so many parishioners throughout our Diocese, their burden has been made a little bit lighter.”

Through the campaign, the St. Luke’s Fund was established with $500,000, specifically raised to assist with providing care and transportation addressing the medical needs of people with developmental disabilities and other vulnerable populations.

In addition to DPD and diocesan Catholic Charities agencies — Catholic Family and Community Service and Straight and Narrow, the campaign extends its reach to the poor, each of the parishes in the Paterson Diocese, important Catholic values to school children in diocesan schools, assists priests in need of special health care and will restore the Mother Church of the Diocese — the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Paterson. PIF also supported the 2013 Bishop’s Annual Appeal, which assisted in the annual operating costs of diocesan Catholic Charities, Nazareth Village, the retired priests’ residence, seminarian education and elementary school education.

Msgr. James Mahoney, diocesan vicar general and pastor of Corpus Christi Parish in Chatham Township, said, “This story highlights just how important Partners in Faith is to the life of people in the Paterson Diocese. Catholic Charities has been able to do more good for people, our cathedral restoration is nearing completion, new school initiatives are being planned, the healthcare needs of our priests are being addressed and our parishes are receiving financial support. So many things that were impossible to imagine just a few short years ago are becoming a reality thanks to all who participated in this campaign. I thank all those who contributed to Partners in Faith and those continuing to fulfill their pledge. The Church is alive and well because of their stewardship.”

“This is such an important donation to meet critical transportation needs. It’s one of those things that we might not think about all the time, but this population has many daily struggles to overcome,” said Barrett. “Medical care is so important for the wellbeing of the people that DPD cares for. The mechanics of getting to and from medical appointments and emergencies are critical pieces of the care puzzle. While transportation is just one aspect of meeting medical needs, it is vital. DPD makes sure that the people are always treated with dignity while they provide gentle care that often involves physically assisting people in and out of these vehicles — it is wonderful to know that they can count on improved safely and efficiency, and without worrying about vehicle breakdowns. This is a gift to many special people who receive care and comfort every day from Catholic Charities. The donors may not necessarily see all that is involved, but just imagine having the responsibility for providing thousands of medical visits — the donors to Partner’s in Faith made many vulnerable people comfortable, safe and very happy.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/DPD+Purchases+Eight+New+Cars+Thanks+To+Partners+In+Faith+Donors/2679916/373978/article.html.

Faithful Across The Diocese Plan Trip To Washington For Annual March For Life

Cecile Pagliarulo

CLIFTON It has been more than four decades since the Supreme Court, in its Roe v. Wade decision on Jan. 22, 1973, made abortion legal. But since that infamous date, pro-life advocates have never given up the fight. Still valiant and courageous in their efforts, they are gearing up for the annual March for Life in Washington, D.C., which will be held Friday, Jan. 27. This year’s theme is “The Power of One.”

Because of the logistics of the Presidential Inauguration this year on Jan. 20, the 2017 March for Life will be held five days after the Jan. 22, 1973 anniversary date.

Dr. Mary Mazzarella, consultant for the diocesan Respect Life Office, who is a retired pediatrician said, “It is inspiring to me to see the hundred of thousands of people who brave the cold to state why they are pro-life.”

As early as 6 a.m. buses will leave from locations all across the Diocese in Passaic, Morris and Sussex counties for the five-hour bus trip to Washington. At some parishes, the day will begin with the celebration of Mass as spiritual preparation for the March for Life. Once all the busses arrive in Washington, Father Michael Rodak, pastor of Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish in West Milford, will celebrate Mass at 12:10 p.m. in St. Peter Church on Capitol Hill. This is a meeting point for many of the diocesan buses traveling to Washington.

Father Rodak, who is also diocesan pilgrimage director, encourages people to attend the Mass. “With the church three blocks from Capitol Hill, it’s so important we come together in prayer and pray in the shadows of the Congressional offices, where legislation begins. It’s so significant we do this on a day dedicated to being pro-life,” said Father Rodak.

The March begins at 1 p.m. following a rally, which takes place on the grounds of the Washington Monument. From there, marchers will trek down Constitution Avenue to Capitol Hill, walking past the U.S. Capitol building. The March ends outside the Supreme Court, directly behind the U.S. Capitol. At approximately 3 p.m., testimonies will be given by women and men affected by abortion through the Silent No More awareness campaign. Participants are also advised to visit their local Congressmen or Senators to advocate for life at Senate Office and House Office buildings in the vicinity of Capitol Hill.

Because the March falls on a workday, many laypersons from around the diocese use vacations days or personal time to attend the March, showing the deep commitment many have to stop the scourge of abortion. Many students will also attend the March traveling with diocesan high schools, college pro-life groups or their parish.

Students now make up about 60 percent of the marchers and Father Rodak believes this is a positive sign that shows how the younger generation is a pro-life generation. “The call for a generation for life is a greater calling than ever before. Young people are calling for a respect for life and for the children in the womb. In the general population, the majority of people in the U.S. are against partial birth abortion and the number of people against abortion period has increased,” he said.

With social media as a popular way to communicate and spread messages, the March for Life is taking advantage of this tool of technology and believes it is a critical way to advocate for a culture of life, especially since the secular media does not bother to give coverage to the March. Organizers are encouraging pro-lifers to upload photos to Instagram, Facebook or Twitter with the hashtag #WhyWeMarch along with the reason why they are marching on Jan. 27.

According to many of the participants, with President-elect Trump and his administration that is pro-life, there will be a hopeful tone to this year’s March. Father Rodak said, “With the opportunity to attend the March with a new administration in Washington and the promises made in the campaign, we as Catholics have to continue to be vocal. We need to see Supreme Court judges who support human life, pro-life polices made in government and the right to life for the child in the womb.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Faithful+Across+The+Diocese+Plan+Trip+To+Washington+For+Annual+March+For+Life/2679918/373978/article.html.

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