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SUSSEX THE BEACON’S 34TH ANNUAL CHRISTMAS SHARING FUND BEGINS PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. 4 MORRIS NOVEMBER 24, 2016 R ESPECT L IFE M ASS 14 9 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Bishop urges faithful to demonstrate courage in defending the value of life By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR OUR LADY OF FATIMA STATUE VISITS PARISHES IN THE DIOCESE STUDENTS ATTEND CLOSING MASS FOR YEAR OF MERCY 10 6 12-13 14 15-20 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI RESPECT LIFE Bishop Serratelli celebrated the annual Diocesan Respect Life Mass Nov. 19 in St. Margaret of Scotland Church, Morristown, where clergy, religious and laity joined in prayer and mutual support for the protection of all human life. After the Mass, the Bishop greets Marta Neri of St. Vincent De Paul Parish, Stirling, and her two children, Anastasia, 3, and Luke, 1-1/2. MORRISTOWN Bishop Serratelli celebrated the annual Diocesan Respect Life Mass on Nov. 19 at St. Margaret of Scotland Church here, where he encouraged Catholics to follow the example of Mother Teresa, who exercised “unflinching courage” in defending the dignity of all human life, even in the face of strong political opposition. Local clergy, religious and laity from around the Diocese filled St. Margaret’s for the 10 a.m. annual Respect Life Mass — formally known as the Mass for the Unborn — to gather together in prayer and mutual support for protecting all hu-man life, born and unborn. Bishop Serratelli, who served as main cel-ebrant and homilist, started the litur-gy by proclaiming, “We gather to-gether to thank God for the gift of life.” Many priests of the Church of Paterson concelebrated the Mass, which was sponsored by the Paterson Federation of the Knights of Columbus. “As faithful Catholics, we must be unmistakably clear and coura-geous — as Mother Teresa was — even in the face of those, who dis-‘ Let your faith influence your life, including political issues. We can influence politicians on issues such as Respect for Life and immigration.’ — B ISHOP S ERRATELLI agree that abortion, euthanasia and assisted suicide are always wrong — to those who turn from the truth,” Bishop Serratelll told the con-RESPECT LIFE MASS on 11 Catholic lawyers urged to stay connected to Divine Truth By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR Program fellow tells lawyers to ‘embrace Catholic identity’ Catholic Studies Program in Wash -ington, D.C. Also an attorney, she spoke Nov. 16 at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization here to a gathering of members of the Advocati Christi Outreach to Catholic Lawyers — a diocesan fellowship of lawyers and judges, who are committed to the le-gal profession and profession of their faith, which started eight years ago. “More than ever, we need to iden-tify as Catholics, embrace our identify and join together as Cath olics. Faith needs to be our vitality. Now is the time for us to evangelize and go make a difference,” said Hasson, who also directs the Catholic Women’s Forum, an initiative that responds to Pope Francis’s call for Catholic women to assume a higher profile within the Church and think with the Church in addressing the prob-lems of today. “But first, we must have a relationship with Jesus and with the truth,” she told the lawyers. Hasson’s presentation kicked off Advocati Christi’s ongoing series of four talks by notable legal and reli-gious minds. It will continue next year with Prof. Robert George, the McCormick Chair in Jurisprudence at Princeton University; Samuel Alito Jr., an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court; and Father Paul Scalia, delegate for clergy in the Diocese of Arlington, Va., and son of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Hasson focused her presentation on the lawyers and judges with a broader message that calls all faith-ful to maintain their Catholic iden-tity. Over the past 30 years, Catholics have assimilated into the culture but have failed to embrace their Catholic identity, said Hasson, editor of “Promise and Challenge: Catholic Women Reflect on Feminism, Complementarity, and the Church.” STAY CONNECTED on 8 MADISON Society has become in-creasingly “unmoored from God’s truth” with its widespread support of issues such as abortion, “gay mar-riage” and the “right” of people to identify with the gender of their choosing. So more than ever, Catholic lawyers — along with the rest of the faithful — need to stay connected to that Divine Truth and proclaim it not only in their personal lives, but also in their professional lives as officers of the court. Sounding that alarm to local Catholic lawyers and judges was Mary Rice Hasson, a fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center’s

Respect Life Mass

Michael Wojcik

Bishop urges faithful to demonstrate courage in defending the value of life

MORRISTOWN Bishop Serratelli celebrated the annual Diocesan Respect Life Mass on Nov. 19 at St. Margaret of Scotland Church here, where he encouraged Catholics to follow the example of Mother Teresa, who exercised “unflinching courage” in defending the dignity of all human life, even in the face of strong political opposition.

Local clergy, religious and laity from around the Diocese filled St. Margaret’s for the 10 a.m. annual Respect Life Mass — formally known as the Mass for the Unborn — to gather together in prayer and mutual support for protecting all human life, born and unborn. Bishop Serratelli, who served as main celebrant and homilist, started the liturgy by proclaiming, “We gather together to thank God for the gift of life.” Many priests of the Church of Paterson concelebrated the Mass, which was sponsored by the Paterson Federation of the Knights of Columbus.

“As faithful Catholics, we must be unmistakably clear and courageous — as Mother Teresa was — even in the face of those, who disagree that abortion, euthanasia and assisted suicide are always wrong — to those who turn from the truth,” Bishop Serratelll told the congregants in his homily.

Mother Teresa showed that fearlessness for Respect Life, during her entire ministry as a religious sister, and received widespread attention for her very direct speech at the National Prayer Breakfast on Feb. 3, 1994 in Washington D.C. where she received an honor for her work. There, she called abortion “the greatest destroyer of love and peace” and declared, “Jesus said, ‘If you receive a little child, you receive me.’ Every abortion is the neglect of receiving Jesus.” Mother Teresa also stated, “If we accept a mother killing her own child, how can we tell people not to kill one another? Any nation that accepts abortion is teaching its people to use violence to get what they want.”

The audience — filled with 3,000 Washington elites, including members of Congress and U.S. Supreme Court justices — seemed uncomfortable with her message at first, but eventually stood and applauded for six minutes. Yet, two other audience members, President Bill Clinton and First Lady Hillary Clinton, sat motionless during Mother Teresa’s speech. She approached the First Lady after the speech to express her opposition to abortion further, showing “unflinching courage,” said Bishop Serratelli in his homily.

“From the moment of our conception, the living God is calling us to enter into a relationship with him — a relationship that lasts beyond this world. The present question is how are we to live out our relationship with the God of life?” said Bishop Serratelli, adding that we do so by caring for the elderly, terminally ill, marginalized, sick, suffering and children waiting to be born. “We clearly and courageously show that God is the God of Life.”

During the Respect Life Mass, chaired by Deacon Anthony Fierro of St. Bonaventure Parish, Paterson, those in attendance prayed intentions for all human beings — born and unborn. The liturgy represented the commitment of the Knights, the largest Catholic fraternal service organization, to pro-life issues. The faithful also included many deacons, religious sisters and laity, including families with children.

Toward the end of the liturgy, Joseph Miller, chairman of the Diocesan Federation of the Knights of Columbus, addressed the congregation, saying, “I thank everyone for coming out to the Mass. The Knights believe deeply in Respect for Life.” He thanked Bishop Serratelli; Father Kevin Corcoran, the Bishop’s priest-secretary; Father Hernan Arias, St. Margaret’s pastor; Father Jody Baran of the Byzantine Rite, who serves as the federations’ chaplain; other supportive clergy and religious; and his brother Knights, including the Fourth-Degree Color Corps that participated in the Mass and St. Margaret’s Knights, who organized a reception in the parish hall after the Mass.

At the conclusion of the Mass, Bishop Serratelli thanked the Knights and participating priests and deacons. Then, he walked down for the altar and into the main aisle, expressing to the congregation his dismay that many Catholics “do not let their faith dictate their political choices.”

“Let your faith influence your life, including political issues. We can influence politicians on issues such as Respect for Life and immigration,” said Bishop Serratelli, who told the churchgoers that he looks forward to the next Respect Life Mass to be held in the St. John’s Cathedral, Paterson, which has been undergoing extensive renovations and is scheduled to reopen in June.

After the Mass, Marta Neri of St. Vincent De Paul Parish, Stirling, was gathering up her rather spirited children, Anastasia, 3, and Luke, 1-1/2. She belongs to the Morris County parish’s Respect Life Ministry.

“This [Mass] was a celebration of life, including the unborn,” said Neri, who expressed optimism about the outcome of the U. S. presidential election [with a presidentelect, who promises to nominate pro-life judges to the U.S. Supreme Court]. “But there is still so much to be done. I came to the Mass to pray for life and to thank God for my kids — that they are happy, healthy and love the Lord,” she said.

Then, the faithful walked downstairs to St. Margaret’s parish hall for refreshments. There, Dr. Mary Mazzarella, Diocesan Respect Life director, who called the Mass “beautiful” and “well attended,” said “Bishop Serratelli’s remarks were on point. We, as Catholics, have to be pro-life people. That’s where it all begins.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Respect+Life+Mass/2647181/361469/article.html.

Catholic Lawyers Urged To Stay Connected To Divine Truth

Michael Wojcik

Program fellow tells lawyers to ‘embrace Catholic identity’

MADISON Society has become increasingly “unmoored from God’s truth” with its widespread support of issues such as abortion, “gay marriage” and the “right” of people to identify with the gender of their choosing. So more than ever, Catholic lawyers — along with the rest of the faithful — need to stay connected to that Divine Truth and proclaim it not only in their personal lives, but also in their professional lives as officers of the court.

Sounding that alarm to local Catholic lawyers and judges was Mary Rice Hasson, a fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center’s Catholic Studies Program in Wash - ington, D.C. Also an attorney, she spoke Nov. 16 at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization here to a gathering of members of the Advocati Christi Outreach to Catholic Lawyers — a diocesan fellowship of lawyers and judges, who are committed to the legal profession and profession of their faith, which started eight years ago.

“More than ever, we need to identify as Catholics, embrace our identify and join together as Cath olics. Faith needs to be our vitality. Now is the time for us to evangelize and go make a difference,” said Hasson, who also directs the Catholic Women’s Forum, an initiative that responds to Pope Francis’s call for Catholic women to assume a higher profile within the Church and think with the Church in addressing the problems of today. “But first, we must have a relationship with Jesus and with the truth,” she told the lawyers.

Hasson’s presentation kicked off Advocati Christi’s ongoing series of four talks by notable legal and religious minds. It will continue next year with Prof. Robert George, the McCormick Chair in Jurisprudence at Princeton University; Samuel Alito Jr., an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court; and Father Paul Scalia, delegate for clergy in the Diocese of Arlington, Va., and son of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

Hasson focused her presentation on the lawyers and judges with a broader message that calls all faithful to maintain their Catholic identity. Over the past 30 years, Catholics have assimilated into the culture but have failed to embrace their Catholic identity, said Hasson, editor of “Promise and Challenge: Catholic Women Reflect on Feminism, Complementarity, and the Church.”

“We need to embrace who we are as Catholics — to think that our faith is so great that we want to share it with others. You have to speak God’s truth, because there are so many untruths against humanity out there,” said Hasson, who noted that the Church supports positions that defend respect for life, the traditional family and a biological understanding of manhood and womanhood — unpopular stances that might get vocal Catholics branded as “bigots” in modern society. “Pope Francis said the we should walk with people toward the light, show them the truth and give them the confidence [to believe]. The Holy Spirit will give you the words to say,” she said.

Catholics need to maintain a “relationship with God and the truth” that he has handed down to us through the Church. The faithful should seek that understanding by asking the Lord in prayer and through the Sacraments. St. John Paul II urged people — even those who have doubts — to “engage the truth” by seeking the insights of those in authority, all while never dismissing the truth, Hasson said.

“God loves us enough to give us the truth. The Church is the guardian of that truth. We have to have certainty in that truth. We need to guard it and give it to others,” said Hasson, who also advised the lawyers, “It’s important to know when to speak and when not to speak.”

Hasson also spoke about Catholic principles in relation to the N.J. Disciplinary Rules of Professional Conduct for lawyers. “It’s not about maximizing your [billable] hours or fees. It’s not about putting yourself first. It’s not enough to do as little as possible to limit your responsibility and liability. It’s not enough just to follow the law,” said Hasson, who, along with her husband, Kevin J. “Seamus” Hasson, are the parents of seven children. Hasson, who received the 2015 St. John Paul II Award for the New Evangeli zation from the Catholic Information Center, said, “You must change your thinking — to care for the ‘other’ in society. Jesus is saying, ‘I want you to know what you are feeling about the people you a serving.’ It’s for the common good. That responsibility comes from Catholicism,” she said.

After Hasson’s presentation, participating lawyers gathered for dinner and roundtable discussion on the main floor of St. Paul’s. One of the founding members of Advocati Christi, Mark Scirocco, said that her talk “did so much good,” because lawyers should bring up these issues in their profession. Other founding members of the group were present that evening, including Denise Wennogle, Patricia O’Dowd and Richard Maggi.

“I was struck by how important it is for us to be diligent in our knowledge of the faith and act with confidence in the faith,” said Father Paul Manning, diocesan vicar for evangelization and St. Paul’s executive director, during a short question-and-answer period after her talk. The priest then told the speaker, “I appreciate your presence for our inaugural presentation.”

[Information about Advocati Christi:(973) 377-1004 or www.insidethewalls.org.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Catholic+Lawyers+Urged+To+Stay+Connected+To+Divine+Truth/2647191/361469/article.html.

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