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The Beacon The Beacon_Oct.27,2016 : Page 1

From Bishop Serratelli: “Many thanks to all for their prayers for me during my recent surgery. I am convalescing while I await medical test results.” SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS OCTOBER 27, 2016 ‘A J EWEL I NTHE C ITY ’ 12 7 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard BI S HOP VI S IT S W A YNE P A RI S H, A DMINI S TER S C ONFIRM A TION DIO C E S E M A RK S A NNU A L C ELEBR A TION OF WORLD MI SS ION S UND A Y Bishop helps Paterson parish mark centenary By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR 9 6 8 12 13-14 15-20 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS O BITUARIES Y OUTH W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS REMEMBERING FIREFIGHTERS At the Diocese’s second annual Fallen BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Firefighters Mass Oct. 18, firemen from departments around the diocese fill the pews of St. Gerard Church in Paterson. Msgr. James Mahoney, diocesan vicar general, moderator of the Curia and pastor of Corpus Christi Parish in Chatham Township, where he has served as fire chaplain, was the main celebrant. Father Brando Ibarra, pastor of St. Mary Help of Christians Parish in Paterson, delivered the homily. For story and more photos, see page 2. PATERSON Our Lady of Pompei Parish (OLP) here, which has been called a “jewel in the city” and a “tight-knit family of faith,” celebrat-ed its centennial Oct. 16. On that day, Bishop Serratelli was main celebrant and homilist of the 10:30 a.m. Mass to mark the 100th anniversary of the founding of OLP as a parish. Current and for-mer parishioners, who filled the church to capacity and beyond, at-tended the Mass. That morning, the Bishop also dedicated and blessed extensive renovations that signifi-cantly updated the look — and sound — of the church’s interior. Concelebrating the liturgy were Father Frank Agresti, OLP’s pastor since 2011; Father Sal Panagia, for-mer pastor and a retired priest; Franciscan Father Francis McHugh, parochial vicar at St. Bonaventure Parish, Paterson; and Father Kevin Corcoran, the Bishop’s priest-secre-tary. During Mass, Father Agresti presented parishioners with a bless-ing from Pope Francis to commem-orate the platinum jubilee. A recep-tion at the Brownstone in Paterson followed the Mass. With deep Italian roots, the parish continues to welcome people of various ethnicities as the demo-graphics of Paterson keep changing, while also remaining faithful to its founders’ roots and religious tradi-tions. “We at Our Lady of Pompei are a vibrant people, who are devoted to the parish. It’s a beautiful little parish that’s a tight-knit family of faith,” said Father Agresti, who not-ed that 400-family parish serves parishioners from many ethnicities, including Hispanic, Polish, German and Irish, but still mainly consists of faithful of Italian decent, including many of whom can trace their fam-ilies back to its founding in 1916. “I admire that they continue to live their traditions and faithfulness. They have an Old World faith that holds on to the beauty of the Mass and the priesthood,” he said. Today, most OLP parishioners live outside Paterson — anywhere from Woodland Park and Wayne to Lyndhurst and New York City. Yet they feel drawn to return to the small JEWEL on 10 Support from donors allows DPD to serve adults with disabilities By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER OAK RIDGE At the Department for Persons with Disabilities (DPD) here, every life is valuable and has pur-pose. This belief is reflected through the more than 100 clients, the Diocesan Catholic Charities agency serves. For the last 50 years, the DPD has provided loving support for adults with developmental or intel-lectual disabilities — persons who are often among the most margin-alized in society. As part of the Diocesan Catholic Charities family, the Bishop’s Annual Appeal supports the work of the DPD. This year’s Appeal theme, “Be Rich in Good Works,” gives the faith-ful the opportunity to continue the important good works of the DPD. “The Department for Persons with Disa bilities does God’s work each day, said Chris Brancato, develop-ment director. “The help that we pro-vide makes a difference in the lives 2016 of many people in need. We promote independence and help people to fulfill their dreams. We would not have been able to do this without generosity from our donors, board mem-bers and parishioners through the Bishop’s Annual Appeal.” The DPD operates 10 group homes and two supervised apartments throughout Morris, Sussex and Pas -saic Counties. In addition, the DPD runs a vocational day program at its Gruenert Center in Lake Hopatcong. It also provides support coordina-tion for individuals who live in Sussex County, recreational activi-ties and pastoral care. The agency opened its newest home Giuliano House, last December in Oak Ridge. It is home to four medical needy in-dividuals, who formerly lived in de-velopmental centers. Even with this recent expansion, there is still a great need for services. Because of this personalized care, there are more than 8,000 people on a waiting list APPEAL on 4

‘A Jewel In The City’

Michael Wojcik

Bishop helps Paterson parish mark centenary

PATERSON Our Lady of Pompei Parish (OLP) here, which has been called a “jewel in the city” and a “tight-knit family of faith,” celebrated its centennial Oct. 16.

On that day, Bishop Serratelli was main celebrant and homilist of the 10:30 a.m. Mass to mark the 100th anniversary of the founding of OLP as a parish. Current and former parishioners, who filled the church to capacity and beyond, attended the Mass. That morning, the Bishop also dedicated and blessed extensive renovations that significantly updated the look — and sound — of the church’s interior.

Concelebrating the liturgy were Father Frank Agresti, OLP’s pastor since 2011; Father Sal Panagia, former pastor and a retired priest; Franciscan Father Francis McHugh, parochial vicar at St. Bonaventure Parish, Paterson; and Father Kevin Corcoran, the Bishop’s priest-secretary. During Mass, Father Agresti presented parishioners with a blessing from Pope Francis to commemorate the platinum jubilee. A reception at the Brownstone in Paterson followed the Mass.

With deep Italian roots, the parish continues to welcome people of various ethnicities as the demographics of Paterson keep changing, while also remaining faithful to its founders’ roots and religious traditions.

“We at Our Lady of Pompei are a vibrant people, who are devoted to the parish. It’s a beautiful little parish that’s a tight-knit family of faith,” said Father Agresti, who noted that 400-family parish serves parishioners from many ethnicities, including Hispanic, Polish, German and Irish, but still mainly consists of faithful of Italian decent, including many of whom can trace their families back to its founding in 1916. “I admire that they continue to live their traditions and faithfulness. They have an Old World faith that holds on to the beauty of the Mass and the priesthood,” he said.

Today, most OLP parishioners live outside Paterson — anywhere from Woodland Park and Wayne to Lyndhurst and New York City. Yet they feel drawn to return to the small parish at the edge of the Silk City for Masses and various religious traditions and events. This includes an Italian procession on Christmas Eve with the Baby Jesus, as parishioners sing an ethnic hymn, “Tu Scendi Dalle Stella” or “From the Starry Skies Descending.” OLP also offers a full complement of ministries, including Bible study, youth group, religious education and children’s Liturgy of the Word, according to its bulletin.

Just in time for the anniversary Mass, the interior of OLP’s church received an eye-popping make over. It called for the removal of carpets and the polishing of the terrazzo floor underneath; the repositioning of the tabernacle in the center of the altar; the replacement of a painted crucifix over the tabernacle with the church’s original plaster cross that an artist restored; the return of an Our Lady of Pompei statue to a niche above the altar; and the installation of two new statues of St. Dominic and St. Catherine of Siena, which were created by an artist and positioned on either side of the altar. Also, crinkle wallpaper was removed from the walls of worship space and tile added in its place, Father Agresti said.

“The décor of the church was stuck in the 1970s. It needed an update. Now, the church feels bigger, brighter and cleaner. The sound bounces of the walls,” he said.

OLP started as a mission church of St. Michael Parish, Paterson, to serve the Italian community in the Stony Road area in the western section of the city, directed by Msgr. Felix Cianci, St. Michael’s pastor. The mission was elevated to a parish in 1916, the year that the then-new Catholic Extension Society, a national organization that helps small, rural and struggling parishes around the U.S., gave $1,000 to OLP to help build its original clapboard chapel. In 1924, the Capuchin Sisters of the Infant Jesus arrived at the parish to live in a convent on Caldwell Avenue and engage in social service work and religious education. Later, a property at 74 Murray Avenue was purchased for a new convent, according to OLP’s history.

In 1962, Father Silvius Mancini finally undertook construction of a much-needed new church — which the parish delayed several times — at the corner of Caldwell Avenue and Dayton Street. Bishop James Navagh of Paterson dedicated to the new church in 1963, the same year that the Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Conception were transferred and replaced by the Capuchin Sisters, the parish history states.

OLP made national headlines in 1992, when priests and parishioners reported that a 30-inch statue of Our Lady of Fatima here changed color before their eyes, according to a story in The Beacon that May.

“The claims provide us with an opportunity to point out that statues and depictions of the Blessed Mother and saints do have a place in the Church’s devotion, insofar as they remind the faithful of the lives of the holy persons they represent,” said Msgr. Herbert Tillyer, then diocesan vicar general and now pastor of St. Peter the Apostle Parish, Parsippany.

In 2011, Our Lady of Pompei welcomed a special image, a replica of a painting in the Shrine of Our Lady of the Rosary in Pompei, as part of a pilgrimage, the Pompei Marian Mission, which traveled through several U.S. dioceses that June. Bishop Serratelli celebrated an Italian-English Mass in the church, which was concelebrated by priests of the diocese and a delegation of priests from Italy, according to a story in The Beacon.

One of the active parishioners, who attended the 100th anniversary Mass, was Mary Lotito, OLP’s director of religious education for 30 years. She and her husband, Richard, begin attending the parish 47 years ago, when they moved from Lyndhurst to West Paterson, which is now named Woodland Park. Their two grown children, Richard and Melissa, both received their Sacraments and served as altar servers here. Now, the religious education program teaches the children of former students, such as Lotito’s granddaughter, Carmella, who recently received her first Holy Communion, she said.

“Our Lady of Pompei is a jewel in the city of Paterson,” Lotito said. “We are a church family. We feel the Jesus and the Holy Spirit in the church when we are praying. We welcome people into the parish with open arms. We want them to feel what we are feeling,” she said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/%E2%80%98A+Jewel+In+The+City%E2%80%99/2622441/352062/article.html.

Support From Donors Allows DPD To Serve Adults With Disabilities

Cecile Pagliarulo

OAK RIDGE At the Department for Persons with Disabilities (DPD) here, every life is valuable and has purpose. This belief is reflected through the more than 100 clients, the Diocesan Catholic Charities agency serves. For the last 50 years, the DPD has provided loving support for adults with developmental or intellectual disabilities — persons who are often among the most marginalized in society.

As part of the Diocesan Catholic Charities family, the Bishop’s Annual Appeal supports the work of the DPD. This year’s Appeal theme, “Be Rich in Good Works,” gives the faithful the opportunity to continue the important good works of the DPD.

“The Department for Persons with Disa bilities does God’s work each day, said Chris Brancato, development director. “The help that we provide makes a difference in the lives of many people in need. We promote independence and help people to fulfill their dreams. We would not have been able to do this without generosity from our donors, board members and parishioners through the Bishop’s Annual Appeal.”

The DPD operates 10 group homes and two supervised apartments throughout Morris, Sussex and Pas - saic Counties. In addition, the DPD runs a vocational day program at its Gruenert Center in Lake Hopatcong. It also provides support coordination for individuals who live in Sussex County, recreational activities and pastoral care. The agency opened its newest home Giuliano House, last December in Oak Ridge. It is home to four medical needy individuals, who formerly lived in developmental centers. Even with this recent expansion, there is still a great need for services. Because of this personalized care, there are more than 8,000 people on a waiting list to get into programs like the DPD offers.

The agency is the only Catholic organization in the state of New Jersey that provides care for people with individuals and developmental disabilities and it is also one of the largest in the country.

Donations from the Appeal are always used toward direct support and are never used toward administrative costs. In the past, Appeal funds have been used for necessary home repairs, unbudgeted expenses, program upgrades, recreational activities and to make necessary program modifications to allow the individuals who live in the programs “age in place.” Each year, the organization is subject to cost of living increases and state budget reductions. Donations help ensure that the DPD is always providing the highest level of care possible.

To learn more about the Department for Persons with Disabilities, the agency invites the faithful to like its Facebook page, which is frequently updated or visit its website at www.dpd.org. They also encourage tours of its group homes and vocational center to see firsthand the work and ministry they do in serving those with disabilities and witness how these individuals are cared for with love and respect.

In addition to DPD, Appeal donations will help the other divisions of Diocesan Catholic Charities — Catholic Family and Community Services and Straight and Narrow The Appeal will also support diocesan seminarian education, Catholic elementary school students in inner city areas and Nazareth Village, the priest retirement residence.

Brancato said, “We can’t thank all those who give to the Appeal enough. Your support helps make a lasting impact on the lives of God’s special people and the entire DPD family is very appreciative of you generosity.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Support+From+Donors+Allows+DPD+To+Serve+Adults+With+Disabilities/2622510/352062/article.html.

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