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The Beacon Beacon_Sept 22 2016 : Page 1

3 BISHOP ISSUES PASTORAL LETTER TO COLLEGE STUDENTS SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. MORRIS SEPTEMBER 22, 2016 9 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Diocesan pilgrims return from witnessing historic moment of Mother Teresa’s canonization By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER 4 18 MEN TAKE PART IN RITE OF CANDIDACY FOR DIACONATE ASSUMPTION PRINCIPAL MARKS 50 YEARS IN RELIGIOUS LIFE 9 12 13-14 15-20 11 H ONORING F ILIPINO S AINTS BEACON PHOTO | RICH GIGLI W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS Elmer Nieto, diocesan seminarian, and Father Lemmuel Camacho, parochial vicar at Corpus Christi Parish in Chatham Township, kneel during the Liturgy of the Eucharist at a Mass honoring two Filipino saints — St. Lorenzo Ruiz and St. Pedro Calungsod — in St. Clare Church, Clifton, Sept. 17. Bishop Serratelli was the main celebrant of the Mass. For story and more photos, see page 10. ROME As tens of thousands witnessed the canonization of Mother Teresa of Calcutta Sept. 4, some of those in St. Peter’s Square in Rome hailed from the Paterson Diocese. The historic canoniza-tion by Pope Francis happened 19 years after the death of the Missionary of Charity, who devoted her life working with the sick and poor in India and around the world. Father Yojaneider Garcia, parochial vicar at St. Peter Parish in Parsippany, was one of the pilgrims from the dio-cese who was present at the canoniza-tion. “Mother Teresa is a saint of our time,” he said. “She inspired many peo-ple by her life with her words and her works. Because she lived within the last century, many of us watched her on tel-evision or heard something she did. We knew that she discovered the face of Jesus in the poor people and she was the face of the mercy and tenderness for God.” Father Garcia along with Father Duberney Villamizar, parochial vicar at St. Anthony Parish in Passaic were con-celebrants of the canonization Mass at which Pope Francis, presided. It was a memorable moment for the two young diocesan priests, who led a group of pil-grims to Rome and the Holy Land. Father Villamizar felt especially blessed because he distributed Holy Communion to the crowds during the Mass and could be seen on the jumbo screens in St. Peter’s Square. “It was a gift to give Holy Communion to the people. When the Pope consecrat-ed the host, as the priests held the hosts, it was a very moving moment as the bread became Jesus’ Body,” said Father Villamizar. Because Mother Teresa was a modern day saint, her canonization attracted many people who traveled from all around the world to the Eternal City. Father Garcia said, “The most beautiful thing about the canonization was to see people from different countries speaking different languages. It shows the univer-sality of the Church and that everybody is looking for the mercy of God, being witnesses of the icon of mercy and ten-derness of God — St. Teresa of Calcutta.” “When the Mass was finished,” ST. TERESA on 8 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS I NSPIRED BY C ANONIZATION OF M OTHER T ERESA St. Mother Teresa gives St. Joseph School student Holy Spirit sixth-grader, with commitment to serve idea to give doll to girls undergoing chemotherapy poor, rises at 4 a.m. to watch ceremony in Rome By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR MENDHAM Most girls love to play with dolls — feeding them, dressing them and rocking them to sleep. And they often love when these dolls — especially those who are girls — resemble them. But what if a little girl has no hair on her head — an unpleas-ant side effect of her chemothera-py treatment for cancer? Seven-year-old Katie Castronovo, a second-grader at St. Joseph School here, wants to make sure that girls battling can-cer can play with a doll that looks like them: with no hair. The can-onization of Mother Teresa on Sept. 4 inspired her to plan to set up an apple cider stand in front of her house in Mendham on Satur -day, Sept. 24 to raise money to make a donation to the Valerie Fund at Goryeb Children’s Hos -pital, Morrist own, for an American MENDHAM on 6 By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR PEQUANNOCK Buzz! Buzz! The alarm sounds, piercing the quiet 4 a.m. world of the McTighe house-hold in Riverdale Sept. 4. Eleven-year-old Sarah McTighe — rather cheery for this early hour of the morning — shuts off the alarm and heads downstairs. Excited, the sixth-grader from Holy Spirit School here turns on the TV to watch Mother Teresa step out of the pages of a class report that she had written and into Church history as Pope Francis canonizes her a saint — live from St. Peter’s Square in Rome. And Sarah wouldn’t have missed it for anything because of her devotion to Catholicism’s newest saint, who inspires her in her own commitment to serve the poor. “I have always liked that St. Teresa helped the poor and put PEQUANNOCK on 5

Diocesan Pilgrims Return From Witnessing Historic Moment Of Mother Teresa’s Canonization

Cecile Pagliarulo

ROME As tens of thousands witnessed the canonization of Mother Teresa of Calcutta Sept. 4, some of those in St. Peter’s Square in Rome hailed from the Paterson Diocese. The historic canonization by Pope Francis happened 19 years after the death of the Missionary of Charity, who devoted her life working with the sick and poor in India and around the world.

Father Yojaneider Garcia, parochial vicar at St. Peter Parish in Parsippany, was one of the pilgrims from the diocese who was present at the canonization. “Mother Teresa is a saint of our time,” he said. “She inspired many people by her life with her words and her works. Because she lived within the last century, many of us watched her on television or heard something she did. We knew that she discovered the face of Jesus in the poor people and she was the face of the mercy and tenderness for God.”

Father Garcia along with Father Duberney Villamizar, parochial vicar at St. Anthony Parish in Passaic were concelebrants of the canonization Mass at which Pope Francis, presided. It was a memorable moment for the two young diocesan priests, who led a group of pilgrims to Rome and the Holy Land. Father Villamizar felt especially blessed because he distributed Holy Communion to the crowds during the Mass and could be seen on the jumbo screens in St. Peter’s Square.

“It was a gift to give Holy Communion to the people. When the Pope consecrated the host, as the priests held the hosts, it was a very moving moment as the bread became Jesus’ Body,” said Father Villamizar.

Because Mother Teresa was a modern day saint, her canonization attracted many people who traveled from all around the world to the Eternal City. Father Garcia said, “The most beautiful thing about the canonization was to see people from different countries speaking different languages. It shows the universality of the Church and that everybody is looking for the mercy of God, being witnesses of the icon of mercy and tenderness of God — St. Teresa of Calcutta.”

“When the Mass was finished,”Father Villamizar said, “We were thinking about how God works through those living a normal and simple life like Mother Teresa. There were many people before her that did the same – St. Francis of Assisi, St. Anthony of Padua and St. Vincent DePaul to name a few saints, who all did the same like Mother Teresa.

These people all love God and they love God’s people. It shows how all of us have the possibility to be saints.”

Also attending the canonization was Cesar Jaramillo, a diocesan seminarian studying at Pontifical North American College in Rome, who will be ordained later this month as a transitional deacon. He reflected on the time he spent with the Missionaries of Charity, the order Mother Teresa founded, and the honor of being at the canonization. “It was especially touching for me,” he said, “as I fondly remember the time I spent doing volunteer work with the Missionaries of Charity in Calabria, a city in southern Italy in the 2014. Ever since that experience I have cultivated a great love for the Missionaries of Charity as well as St. Teresa. Her life, I believe, exemplified all the Christian virtues that each one of us is called to live out in our lives and her legacy continues through the work of so many Missionaries of Charity throughout the world.”

In his homily, Pope Francis praised the work of Mother Teresa and Father Garcia said, “The pope invited us to carry with us her smile in our hearts and give it to those whom we meet along our journey, especially those who suffer. We know many people who have lost hope and are discouraged. When Jesus is in our heart we can smile and we can share Jesus with a simple smile and give others hope to continue their life with courage as St. Teresa of Calcutta did.”

The Albanian-born saint founded the Missionaries of Charity in 1950, and today there are more than 4,500 sisters serving in 133 countries. The order runs homes for people dying of HIV/AIDS, leprosy and tuberculosis; soup kitchens; mobile clinics; children’s and family counseling programs, orphanages and schools. Because of the saint’s love for the poorest of the poor, throughout the diocese, many parishes hosted special Masses or presentations in her honor. Both Father Garcia and Father Villamizar noted how appropriate it was for Mother Teresa to be canonized during the Year of Mercy.

Jaramillo believes if there’s anything we can model from St. Teresa’s life, it is her courageousness in spite of the impoverished reality in which she ministered.“She had a courageous resolve to love like Christ did,” he said, “humbly without the cost. I believe our world today needs to be reminded of the true meaning of Christian love — a love that manifests itself, above all, in service and sacrifice.”

Father Garcia said, “At the Last Supper, Jesus gave us a legacy and example of service and love, when he washed the feet of his disciples. St. Teresa of Calcutta realized this with her entire heart and her hands to serve others. She is an icon of God’s tender mercy, radiating the light of God’s love to so many through works of mercy, both corporal and spiritual. She reminds us that we are called to love and serve as Jesus did.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Diocesan+Pilgrims+Return+From+Witnessing+Historic+Moment+Of+Mother+Teresa%E2%80%99s+Canonization/2590837/340634/article.html.

Holy Spirit Sixth-Grader, With Commitment To Serve Poor, Rises At 4 A.M. To Watch Ceremony In Rome

Michael Wojcik

PEQUANNOCK Buzz! Buzz! The alarm sounds, piercing the quiet 4 a. m. world of the McTighe household in Riverdale Sept. 4.

Eleven-year-old Sarah McTighe — rather cheery for this early hour of the morning — shuts off the alarm and heads downstairs. Excited, the sixth-grader from Holy Spirit School here turns on the TV to watch Mother Teresa step out of the pages of a class report that she had written and into Church history as Pope Francis canonizes her a saint — live from St. Peter’s Square in Rome. And Sarah wouldn’t have missed it for anything because of her devotion to Catholicism’s newest saint, who inspires her in her own commitment to serve the poor.

“I have always liked that St. Teresa helped the poor and put others before herself. I like to make sure that poor people are treated like anyone else. They are still human,” said Sarah of St. Mary’s Parish, Pompton Lakes, who watched the canonization with her mother, Ivannia Vega-McTighe, who serves as associate academic dean of evangelization at St. Paul Inside the Walls; the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley- Ellard, Madison. “Pope Francis and other people talked about St. Teresa’s life and the things that she did before the Mass. I liked the [canonization] Mass and that there were so many people there. I wanted to see it live and I’m happy that I did it,” she said.

The Sept. 4 canonization Mass brought Sarah back to memories of fourth grade, when she wrote and delivered a presentation on “Mother Teresa: Helper of the Poor,” a book by Kristen Woronoff. In it, the young girl reported some of the facts of the future saint’s life: that she felt called to religious life at 12 years old; she started the Missionaries of Charity, who care for the poor in 133 countries; and she won the Nobel Peace prize in 1979.

“Mother Teresa is so very important to the world. She loved the poor and always helped them. The Missionaries of Charity keep doing that too. Mother Teresa teaches all of us that we should follow Jesus’ footsteps and help people everywhere. She inspires people,” Sarah wrote in the conclusion of her book report, which received an “A.”

Sarah presented her report to the class by dressing up like Mother Teresa in a white religious habit edged with blue stripes. Her mother, who also serves as director of religious education at Our Lady of Victories (OLV) Parish, Paterson, and her older sister, Hannah, now a 13- year-old Holy Spirit eighth-grader, constructed the outfit from a bed sheet and blue ribbon.

Helping the needy, like Mother Teresa, has always been a part of Sarah’s life. In second grade, she asked family and friends to for ego gifts for her first Holy Communion and, instead, donate to Catholic Relief Services. She has joined classmates at Holy Spirit in collecting coins for Operation Rice Bowl. She also helped organize food drives for the OLV community after Hurricane Sandy and for a local food bank, her mother said.

“We have to do what Jesus did for us. We have to be nice to people like he was and we have to help the poor,” Sarah told The Beacon, when she encouraged people to donate to CRS for her first Holy Communion.

Looking back, her mother noted, “Sarah has had a big heart for the poor for as long as I can remember.”

Inspiration for Sarah’s commitment to the poor comes from many other role models in her life, including the members of St. Mary’s, a Franciscan parish dedicated to social justice. In addition, Sarah’s father, John, also partners with her mother to cultivate “faith life at home.” A professor at Ramapo College, Mahwah, he has dedicated more than 20 years working with the poor of the Bronx, N.Y., Washington, D.C., and Paterson.

Similarly, Sarah hopes to inspire other children and even adults to devote time to minister to the poor. She said, “We should always help others, especially if we already have everything we need.”

Days before St. Teresa’s canonization, Sarah asked her mother if they could get up early to watch it. From a young age, she developed a devotion to the new saint — praying to her and collecting pictures and holy cards. After TV coverage of the event ended around 6:45 a.m., a tired Sarah took a nap.

“John and I tell our two girls that everything we have comes from God and goes to God. Also, we need to get to know [the poor] people for who they are. It’s the biggest blessing to be close to them,” Sarah’s mother said. “The canonization of St. Teresa was beautiful. It was wonderful to see someone from our lifetime canonized a saint,” she said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Holy+Spirit+Sixth-Grader%2C+With+Commitment+To+Serve+Poor%2C+Rises+At+4+A.M.+To+Watch+Ceremony+In+Rome/2590838/340634/article.html.

St. Mother Teresa Gives St. Joseph School Student Idea To Give Doll To Girls Undergoing Chemotherapy

Michael Wojcik

MENDHAM Most girls love to play with dolls — feeding them, dressing them and rocking them to sleep. And they often love when these dolls — especially those who are girls — resemble them.

But what if a little girl has no hair on her head — an unpleasant side effect of her chemotherapy treatment for cancer?

Seven-year-old Katie Castronovo, a second-grader at St. Joseph School here, wants to make sure that girls battling cancer can play with a doll that looks like them: with no hair. The canonization of Mother Teresa on Sept. 4 inspired her to plan to set up an apple cider stand in front of her house in Mendham on Saturday, Sept. 24 to raise money to make a donation to the Valerie Fund at Goryeb Children’s Hospital, Morrist own, for an American Girl doll without hair on her head. The doll will “serve as a support to girls who may have lost or will lose their hair during treatment for childhood cancer,” said her mother, Amy.

“I was listening to the canonization of St. Teresa. I wanted to do something like her. That afternoon, I was looking through my American Girl doll catalog and saw a doll without hair,” said Katie, who belongs to St. Joseph Parish, with her family. “I thought that it would be nice if the girls with cancer in the hospital had a doll to play with, while getting treatment. Also, they would have a doll that looks like them. So, $140, here I come,” she said.

That’s the amount that Katie hopes to raise, while she and others operate an apple cider stand this Saturday, from 10 a. m. to noon, in front of her house at 20 Brockden Drive. Instead of setting a price per cup, they will just ask for a free-will offering. The donations will buy an American Girl doll — one of the most coveted types by girls today — and a pair of pajamas, said Amy, an attorney by profession and now a stay-at-home mother to her only child, Katie.

“St. Teresa told people to ‘stay where you are’ and ‘find your own Calcutta’ [where the saint ministered to the poor in India]. We should do good things for people in our area,” said Amy Castronovo, also co-chair of community/Christian service for St. Joseph’s Home School Board.

So far, Katie has reached the halfway point to her $140 goal. She and her mother sent invitations for donations to friends, family and members of the St. Joseph’s community. Already, many people have contributed, including the school’s principal, Lisa Gillespie.

In the past, she has donated some of her birthday and Christmas gift money to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis. Also, she had participated in service projects at St. Joseph School.

She hopes to buy the doll soon and bring it to Goryeb Children’s Hospital, where she will meet with a staff member to receive it. In the future, she hopes to raise enough money to donate additional dolls without hair, her mother said.

Kelly Blanchette, child life specialist in hematology and oncology at the Valerie Fund Children’s Center, will accept Katie’s donation. She said that the hospital has “never had a donation like this. I can’t wait to meet Katie.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/St.+Mother+Teresa+Gives+St.+Joseph+School+Student+Idea+To+Give+Doll+To+Girls+Undergoing+Chemotherapy/2590843/340634/article.html.

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