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CANDLELIGHT VIGIL FOR 9/11 SET AT STIRLING SHRINE SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. 12 MORRIS SEPTEMBER 8, 2016 7 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Pope Francis: She shows us our ‘vocation to charity’ By HANNAH BROCKHAUS CNA/EWTN NEWS M OTHER T ERESA I SA S AINT ! “We enroll her among the Saints, decreeing that she is to be venerated as such by the whole Church. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Throngs of pilgrims flooded the Vatican to celebrate the highly an-ticipated canonization of Mother Teresa, an event that Catholics and non-Catholics alike have looked forward to since the nun’s death in 1997. “More than just helping people in need, the Christian life must in-clude the roots of charity, putting our entire lives at the service of Christ, as Mother Teresa did,” Pope Francis said Sunday in his homily for the Canonization Mass of Mother Teresa Sept. 4. “The task which the Lord gives us ... is the vocation to charity in which each CANONIZATION on 2 6 ACADEMIC DEAN AT ST. PAUL’S PENS BOOK ON CHRIST’S MERCY YOUTHS FROM STIRLING PARISH HELP NEEDY IN APPALACHIA Pope’s personal copy of The Beacon At a gathering for newly-married couples after his general audience in St. Peter’s Square in Rome Aug. 31, Pope Francis accepts a copy of The Beacon, which featured coverage his trip to the East Coast of the U.S. last fall, from Cecile Pagliarulo, a reporter for The Beacon. Behind her is her husband, Carmine. They were married at a Mass Aug. 26 in St. Anthony Church, Passaic, with Bishop Serratelli officiating. 10 7 10 13-14 15-20 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS W HAT T O D O Y OUTH V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS VATICAN CITY Pope Francis offi-cially declared Mother Teresa of Calcutta a saint of the Catholic Church in front of thousands of pilgrims in St. Peter’s Square Sept. 4 — a move the entire world has been waiting for. “For the honor of the Blessed Trinity, the exaltation of the Catholic faith and the increase of the Christian life, by the authority of our Lord Jesus Christ, and of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul, and our own, after due delibera-tion and frequent prayer for divine assistance, and having sought the counsel of many of our brother Bishops, we declare and define Blessed Teresa of Calcutta to be a Saint,” Pope Francis exclaimed as the crowd roared with applause. Pompton Lakes parish offers faithful way to feel God’s mercy By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR POMPTON LAKES Among the faithful at St. Mary’s Parish here, Charles Carreras has turned to the 489-year-old Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola — a person-al retreat that consists of a series of Scripture readings, prayers, med i tations and spiritual exercises — to find God in his busy life, deepen his relationship with Jesus, integrate his faith life with his everyday experiences, discover the Lord’s graces and find inner peace. Yet, in prayerful silence, this re-tired professor from Ramapo College and other parishioners have discovered the Spiritual Exercises’ life-transforming power. They have been able to experience the joy of the Resurrection, discern God’s plan for their lives and be inspired to “set the world on fire:” Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius spreading God’s love and mercy to the world during this Jubilee Year of Mercy in the Church. Over the past few years, Beverly Delleart, certified spiritual director at St. Mary’s, has been guiding several parishioners and other local Catholics, including Carreras, through the Spiritual Exercises — presented in three, four-week sections — which they undertake on their own private re-treat. A retreatant for only nine months, Carreras, who lives in Ringwood, said that he already feels inspired to get more involved in the Passaic County faith com-munity’s Hispanic Ministry. “The Spiritual Exercises aren’t to be read but to be encountered and experienced. They take us deeper [into the heart of Jesus and Scripture] by encouraging us to pray with imagination. We can imagine ourselves as a character in the story of Jesus with the woman at the well,” said Delleart, who not-ed that retreat -ants have been reading through “The Ignatian Adventure: Experiencing the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius in Daily Life” by Jesuit Father Kevin O’Brien. “God can speak to through our emo-tions. We can ask in times of quiet reflection, ‘How did the story make me feel?’ or ‘How does it re-late to my life?’ It’s also about our developing a generous spirit of service and love by asking, ‘For what purpose did God create me?’ ”she said. The first week urges retreatants to reflect on God’s limitless love for us; know that he wants to lib-erate us from anything that ob-structs our loving response to him, including sin; and meditate on Christ’s call to follow him. The sec-ond week features meditations and prayers that encourages partici-pants to follow Jesus as his disci-ples; reflections on Scripture sto-ries, such as Christ’s healing and teaching ministry; and the chal-lenge for them to change their lives to love Christ more deeply, she said. The third week encourages them to meditate on the Last Supper, Passion and death of Jesus with a greater understanding of his agony and giving us the Eucharist SPIRITUAL EXERCISES on 11

Mother Teresa Is A Saint!

Hannah Brockhaus

Pope Francis: She shows us our ‘vocation to charity’

VATICAN CITY Pope Francis officially declared Mother Teresa of Calcutta a saint of the Catholic Church in front of thousands of pilgrims in St. Peter’s Square Sept. 4 — a move the entire world has been waiting for.

“For the honor of the Blessed Trinity, the exaltation of the Catholic faith and the increase of the Christian life, by the authority of our Lord Jesus Christ, and of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul, and our own, after due deliberation and frequent prayer for divine assistance, and having sought the counsel of many of our brother Bishops, we declare and define Blessed Teresa of Calcutta to be a Saint,” Pope Francis exclaimed as the crowd roared with applause.

“We enroll her among the Saints, decreeing that she is to be venerated as such by the whole Church. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.

Throngs of pilgrims flooded the Vatican to celebrate the highly anticipated canonization of Mother Teresa, an event that Catholics and non-Catholics alike have looked forward to since the nun’s death in 1997.

“More than just helping people in need, the Christian life must include the roots of charity, putting our entire lives at the service of Christ, as Mother Teresa did,” Pope Francis said Sunday in his homily for the Canonization Mass of Mother Teresa Sept. 4. “The task which the Lord gives us ... is the vocation to charity in which each of Christ’s disciples puts his or her entire life at his service, so to grow each day in love.”

Referencing the question: “Who can learn the counsel of God?” in the Book of Wisdom, Pope Francis said our task is to realize the call of God and then to do his will. But in order to do his will, we must first find out what it is.

“We find the answer in the same passage of the Book of Wisdom: ‘People were taught what pleases you,’” he said.

What we are called to do, therefore, Pope Francis said, is “to translate into concrete acts that which we invoke in prayer and profess in faith.”

Following Jesus is not for the weak, the Pope continued, but is a serious task, although one “filled with joy. It takes a certain daring and courage to recognize the divine Master in the poorest of the poor and to give oneself in their service.”

The many volunteers and workers of mercy present in St. Peter’s Square Sunday for the Jubilee of Mercy and for Mother Teresa’s canonization are like the “large crowds” traveling with Jesus in the Gospel of Luke, the Pope said. They make visible Christ’s concrete love for each person.

“How many hearts have been comforted by volunteers! How many hands they have held; how many tears they have wiped away; how much love has been poured out in hidden, humble and selfless service!” he said.

Mother Teresa’s life was given to this service. She was committed to defending life, especially the “unborn and those abandoned and discarded,” Francis said. She was “a generous dispenser of divine mercy.”

“She ceaselessly proclaimed that the unborn are the weakest, the smallest, the most vulnerable,” he added.

Just as Christ has bent down to help us, we must bend down to help the Christ found in those in need. “Wherever someone is reaching out, asking for a helping hand in order to get up, this is where our presence — and the presence of the Church which sustains and offers hope — must be.”

Speaking of Mother Teresa, Pope Francis noted how she “bowed down before those who were spent … seeing in them their God-given dignity.”

“Today, I pass on this emblematic figure of womanhood and of consecrated life to the whole world of volunteers: may she be your model of holiness!” he said.

“Let us carry her smile in our hearts and give it to those whom we meet along our journey, especially those who suffer. In this way, we will open up opportunities of joy and hope for our many brothers and sisters who are discouraged and who stand in need of understanding and tenderness.”

After the Mass, Pope Francis continued immediately with praying the Sunday Angelus, first greeting and thanking everyone who took part, especially the Missionaries of Charity, whom he called the “spiritual family of Mother Teresa.”

He also greeted the various national delegations, pilgrims, volunteers and workers of mercy, and anyone who, through media, joined in the celebration from around the world.

“I entrust you to the protection of Mother Teresa: she teaches you to contemplate and adore Jesus Crucified every day, to recognize him and serve him in our brothers in need.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Mother+Teresa+Is+A+Saint%21/2579966/336355/article.html.

Pompton Lakes Parish Offers Faithful Way To Feel God’s Mercy

Michael Wojcik

POMPTON LAKES Among the faithful at St. Mary’s Parish here, Charles Carreras has turned to the 489-year-old Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola — a personal retreat that consists of a series of Scripture readings, prayers, meditations and spiritual exercises — to find God in his busy life, deepen his relationship with Jesus, integrate his faith life with his everyday experiences, discover the Lord’s graces and find inner peace.

Yet, in prayerful silence, this retired professor from Ramapo College and other parishioners have discovered the Spiritual Exercises’ life-transforming power. They have been able to experience the joy of the Resurrection, discern God’s plan for their lives and be inspired to “set the world on fire:” spreading God’s love and mercy to the world during this Jubilee Year of Mercy in the Church.

Over the past few years, Beverly Delleart, certified spiritual director at St. Mary’s, has been guiding several parishioners and other local Catholics, including Carreras, through the Spiritual Exercises — presented in three, four-week sections — which they undertake on their own private retreat. A retreatant for only nine months, Carreras, who lives in Ringwood, said that he already feels inspired to get more involved in the Passaic County faith community’s Hispanic Ministry.

“The Spiritual Exercises aren’t to be read but to be encountered and experienced. They take us deeper [into the heart of Jesus and Scripture] by encouraging us to pray with imagination. We can imagine ourselves as a character in the story of Jesus with the woman at the well,” said Delleart, who noted that retreat - ants have been reading through “The Ignatian Adventure: Experiencing the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius in Daily Life” by Jesuit Father Kevin O’Brien. “God can speak to through our emotions. We can ask in times of quiet reflection, ‘How did the story make me feel?’ or ‘How does it relate to my life?’ It’s also about our developing a generous spirit of service and love by asking, ‘For what purpose did God create me?’ ”she said.

The first week urges retreatants to reflect on God’s limitless love for us; know that he wants to liberate us from anything that obstructs our loving response to him, including sin; and meditate on Christ’s call to follow him. The second week features meditations and prayers that encourages participants to follow Jesus as his disciples; reflections on Scripture stories, such as Christ’s healing and teaching ministry; and the challenge for them to change their lives to love Christ more deeply, she said.

The third week encourages them to meditate on the Last Supper, Passion and death of Jesus with a greater understanding of his agony and giving us the Eucharist as the ultimate expression of his love for us, Delleart said.

“We want to feel the weight of the Cross and be at the foot of the Cross as we journey into Christ’s suffering and to his unconditional love and mercy. It makes us ask, ‘What ought I do for Jesus?’ ” Delleart said. “It’s also about our responsibility in spreading that love and mercy. It’s about saying, ‘I’m about reconciliation and forgiveness.’ ”

The fourth week of the Spiritual Exercises invites participants to reflect on the Christ’s Resurrection and prepares to love and serve Christ, Delleart said.

“It’s about the conversion of our hearts — knowing the joy of the Resurrection in our lives. The Spirit leads us to action, such as performing the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy like feeding the hungry or consoling a friend. God’s grace helps us answer that call,” said Delleart, noting that retreatants write in a journal.

In retirement, Carreras has been asking, ‘What is the rest of my life going to look like?” He previously had been involved in Hispanic outreach in Bergen County and has attended Spanish-language Masses at St. Mary’s.

“The Spiritual Exercises have been challenging. It’s been combination of things — the readings, reflections and commentary — that have helped. I want to be more useful in the parish,” Carreras said.

The Spiritual Exercises helps retreatants to integrate their faith life with their daily life. It also engages them two forms of prayer: meditation — pondering basic guiding principles — and contemplation — imaging their place in the Gospel stories and allowing their deep desires and emotions to get stirred up, Delleart said.

Another major part of the Exercise involves the Examen of Consciousness: praying for God’s help, giving thanks for gifts of the day, praying over feelings that arise with a replay of the day, rejoicing and seeking forgiveness and looking to tomorrow, she said.

Each “week” might take a retreatant longer than seven days to complete in a process that has no time limit. Participants can revisit any section of the text at any time. They complete the pilgrimage privately and accompanied by a spiritual director.

Delleart said that the Spiritual Exercises — created in the 1500s by St. Ignatius, who founded the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) religious order — fits perfectly at the Franciscan-run St. Mary’s, which encourage sparishioners to get more involved in one of the strongest aspects of the parish’s life: community service, she said.

“We let God burst open [in the Spiritual Exercises]. There is a point of no return; we will never by the same,” Delleart said. “When we have a heart of gratitude, we want to do God’s will. It’s then that we do as St. Ignatius directed: ‘Go and set the world on fire.’ ”

[Information: (973) 835-0374, ext. 709.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Pompton+Lakes+Parish+Offers+Faithful+Way+To+Feel+God%E2%80%99s+Mercy/2579982/336355/article.html.

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