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The Beacon The Beacon_08/18/16 : Page 1

X A VERI A N MI SS ION A RIE S A RE HELPING F A MILIE S IN S IERR A LEONE SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. 7 MORRIS AUGUST 18, 2016 10 3 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard ‘A N A RDUOUS AND B EAUTIFUL P ROCESS ’ St. Paul Inside the Walls young adult helps disabled children in Uganda with her new non-profit, Imprint Hope BY MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR YOUNG PEOPLE A T C LIFTON P A RI S H M A KE ‘JOYFUL NOI S E’ RENOVATIONS AT ROCKAWAY CHURCH Following Mass at Hayes Hall during his pastoral visit BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI 4 YOUTH VOLUNTEER S GIVE WEEK OF S ERVI C E TO DIO C E SA N CA THOLI C C H A RITIE S A GEN C IE S 5 6-7 10 11-16 to St. Cecilia Parish in Rockaway, Bishop Serratelli speaks with Father Marcin Michalowski, parochial vicar, and Father Sigmund Peplowski, pastor, as he looks at some of the scaffolding in the sanctuary of St. Cecilia Church, which is currently undergoing renovations. The renovations at St. Cecilia began earlier in the summer through the generous donations of parishioners and friends of the St. Cecilia community. For more photos, see page 8. O BITUARIES V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS Columbian Squires in Sparta build prayer garden to honor late pastor By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS In Memory of Father Pat Rice The Corbins belong to the St. Kateri Colum -bian Squires, St. Leonides Circle sponsored by St. Kateri Knights of Columbus Council 13677. Father Rice was also a Knight of Columbus for more than 30 years and served as the chap-lain for the Paterson Federation for many years. At St. Kateri, there is also a chapter for Catholic young ladies, named the Squire Roses. Maddox Corbin said, “Father Pat was an important part of the work with the Squires and the Squire Roses. He helped to serve the youth and the Knights of Columbus. He trained my brother and me to be altar servers and serve God.” To honor the memory of Father Pat, a priest of the Diocese of Paterson for 41 years, the Corbin brothers decided to create a prayer gar-den. With the help of the St. Kateri Squires, IN MEMORY on 2 SPARTA When the late Father Patrick Rice, pastor of St. Kateri Tekakwitha Parish here, would say “God is good all the time, all the time God is good,” he said it during homilies, to charge up youth and as a reminder about the greatness of God. And it still is a lasting memory the Corbin brothers — Hayden, 13, and Maddox, 11, have of the Irish-born priest, who passed away on Sept. 3, 2015. The two boys got to know Father Rice when he came to St. Kateri in 2009 as pastor. Moved by the priest’s holy ex-ample, they became altar servers creating a bond and a connection with the beloved priest, who advocated greatly for youth to be involved in the work of the Church. After becoming altar servers, they joined the Columbian Squires, an international frater-nity for Catholic young men, ages 10 to 18, sponsored by the local Knights of Columbus. MADISON From birth, Peter, a 7-year-old or-phan from impoverished urban Uganda, has suffered with Cerebral Palsy, which left him bedridden — unable to stand or walk inde-pendently. Yet while the disorder robbed him of some physical abilities needed to move around, it did not steal his iron will and his hope — that one day, he would walk to school. By Peter’s side was Clare Byrne, an occupational therapist and mis-sionary from the Pater son Diocese, who worked with him on therapy — what she IMPRINT HOPE A pain -called “an ardu-ous and beautiful ting that expresses hope process” — to co-for Africa. Clare Byrne of St. Paul’s Young Adults at ordinate and St. Paul Inside the Walls, strengthen his motor skills, so he Madison, embarked on a finally could take mission on Aug. 17 to pro -his first steps inde-vide occupational therapy to disabled orphans in pendently. “Peter fell more than 50 Uganda. times, during therapy, but he always got back up. He showed such perseverance,” said 28-year-old Byrne, a member of the St. Paul’s Young Adults at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Evangelization Center at Bayley-Ellard.” During a yearlong mission trip to Uganda in 2013, she treated about 500 orphans with disabilities, like Peter, who lived in an orphan-age, run by the Missionaries of the Poor, which is located outside Uganda’s capital city of Kampala. “These children were among the most severely disabled group of children I have ever seen. Yes, what amazed me was HOPE on 9

‘An Arduous And Beautiful Process’

Michael Wojcik

St. Paul Inside the Walls young adult helps disabled children in Uganda with her new non-profit, Imprint Hope

MADISON From birth, Peter, a 7-year-old orphan from impoverished urban Uganda, has suffered with Cerebral Palsy, which left him bedridden — unable to stand or walk independently. Yet while the disorder robbed him of some physical abilities needed to move around, it did not steal his iron will and his hope — that one day, he would walk to school.

By Peter’s side was Clare Byrne, an occupational therapist and missionary from the Pater son Diocese, who worked with him on therapy — what she called “an arduous and beautiful process” — to coordinate and strengthen his motor skills, so he finally could take his first steps independently. “Peter fell more than 50 times, during therapy, but he always got back up. He showed such perseverance,” said 28-year-old Byrne, a member of the St. Paul’s Young Adults at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Evangelization Center at Bayley- Ellard.”

During a yearlong mission trip to Uganda in 2013, she treated about 500 orphans with disabilities, like Peter, who lived in an orphanage, run by the Missionaries of the Poor, which is located outside Uganda’s capital city of Kampala. “These children were among the most severely disabled group of children I have ever seen. Yes, what amazed me was that despite their disabilities and challenging living conditions, their joyful and merciful spirit still remained. These children have felt the greatest form of betrayal on this earth. And yet, they opened up their hearts to me and allowed me to love and care for them. This perspective was an incredible testimony that our deepest, darkest fears on this earth can be transfigured by merciful love — if we allow hope to reside within our broken hearts.”

On Aug. 17, Byrne flew back to Uganda for an indefinite period of time to offer rehabilitation services and medical care to a remote village in Northern Uganda. She also returns to the East African country, empowered by a new non-profit organization that she recently founded, Imprint Hope. It will try to provide desperately needed rehabilitation services, wheelchairs, adaptive equipment, and most importantly education and know-how to care for a fraction of Uganda’s 2.7 million children with disability. Sadly, 94 percent of them will not complete a basic education. Only 1 percent of teachers is trained to work with disabled students with disabilities and is hampered by limited resources, Byrne said.

“Imprint Hope is designed to raise awareness, break down barriers, and overcome the stigma that children with disabilities in Uganda face on a daily basis. It envisions a world where every child with disabilities is appreciated for his or her unique talents and provided an opportunity to actualize their full potential,” said Byrne, who earned a master’s degree in occupational therapy from Seton Hall University, South Orange, in 2012.

Ugandan society suffers from a lack of education and awareness as to what a disability is and how they can help these children, who are often labeled “kasiru,” or “stupid person.” Adults often avoid their children, because of an unfounded belief that their disabilities are contagious or that they are the result of sinfulness. Government efforts to help these children are not enforced, leaving them to struggle without aid, Byrne said.

In 2013, Byrne got her first glimpse of Uganda’s forgotten children during her visit to the orphanage outside the nation’s capital — a mission trip organized by the Catholic Medical Mission Board. There, she cared for children, suffering from neurological, physical, cognitive and visual disabilities, such as Cerebral Palsy, Hydrocephalus, joint dislocation, Epilepsy, swallowing disorders and Cerebral Malaria. These disabilities left many of the children in dire need of medical attention and rehabilitation services, which are simply not available to them, Byrne said.

The Missionaries of the Poor brothers cared for these children the best they could but lacked the education, understanding, medical support, and therapy equipment needed to effectively care for their medical needs. So, Byrne secured some equipment — including wheelchairs, bracing, and a sound system — from her incredibly generous contacts in the U.S. She helped streng - then the children’s weak muscular system so they could more efficiently hold up their heads, sit up, stand and walk. During a few afternoons a week, Byrne also conducted educational classes for the brothers, parents and other caregivers to help shed some insight on the cause of a disability and how to care for their basic needs of how to feed them with an upright neck instead of lying down; how to hold them; and how to appropriately position them in a wheelchair or on a mattress.

“I sought to educate and empower parents on the ‘why’ and ‘how’, so they could greater understand their child. So if their child is having a seizure, it’s not because he or she is cursed by sin, and if they touch their child, they will not get the disorder. The caretakers want to take care of their children, but simply don’t know how. They have never even heard of key terms like Cerebral Palsy, Autism and Down Syn drome,” Byrne said. “I believe in empowerment — helping provide education so parents are able to understand and care for their child with dignity,” she said.

After her first mission trip to Uganda, Byrne returned to the U.S. to work as an occupational therapist in Newark and Hoboken. She returned to Uganda late last year — this time staying with a mission family in the remote village in the Northern region of Uganda, which lacked access to basic medical care. During the month long trip, her heart was moved by compassion to the struggles of about 500 disabled and abandoned children, who lie in mud huts all day, said Byrne. In July, she spoke at a fundraiser for Imprint Hope at St. Paul’s. Byrne also seeks contributions for her monthly living expenses and for the building of a rehabilitation clinic to better serve and provide medical care to the children over there.

On the social-networking website Face - book, Derek Gazal, also from St. Paul’s Young Adults, praised Byrne’ “mission of fighting poverty and giving kids hope.” He also encouraged people to donate to Imprint Hope.

“She [Byrne] is doing a tremendous work in Africa. Especially during these times, we need to be humanitarians by supporting our humanitarians if we our selves are not able to be on the front line of social justice and charity,” Gazal said.

Byrne’s compassion for the disabled has only grown since childhood, when her sister, Katherine, now 22, first inspired her. Her sister struggles with various neurological and physical disabilities, which greatly affects her ability to express herself with words and move her body in a purposeful manner.

“I look beyond disability. I look to Katherine’s heart and how she loves and cares for others. She will get someone a tissue if they sneeze and a cup of water if you cough without even asking. It’s her intuition. It’s her way of loving the way she knows how to love, which is expecting nothing in return,” Byrne said.

Last week in an interview with The Beacon, Byrne called this most recent mission trip to Uganda “an open-ended commitment.”

“I never knew what blind faith was before this experience. I’m open to the Holy Spirit and where God leads me. I’m willing to be an instrument of love,” Byrne said.

[To donate to Imprint Hope, visit the organization’s Web site at www.imprinthope.com]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/%E2%80%98An+Arduous+And+Beautiful+Process%E2%80%99/2560876/330507/article.html.

Columbian Squires In Sparta Build Prayer Garden To Honor Late Pastor

Cecile San Agustin

In Memory of Father Pat Rice

SPARTA When the late Father Patrick Rice, pastor of St. Kateri Tekakwitha Parish here, would say “God is good all the time, all the time God is good,” he said it during homilies, to charge up youth and as a reminder about the greatness of God.

And it still is a lasting memory the Corbin brothers — Hayden, 13, and Maddox, 11, have of the Irish-born priest, who passed away on Sept. 3, 2015. The two boys got to know Father Rice when he came to St. Kateri in 2009 as pastor. Moved by the priest’s holy example, they became altar servers creating a bond and a connection with the beloved priest, who advocated greatly for youth to be involved in the work of the Church.

After becoming altar servers, they joined the Columbian Squires, an international fraternity for Catholic young men, ages 10 to 18, sponsored by the local Knights of Columbus.

The Corbins belong to the St. Kateri Colum - bian Squires, St. Leonides Circle sponsored by St. Kateri Knights of Columbus Council 13677. Father Rice was also a Knight of Columbus for more than 30 years and served as the chaplain for the Paterson Federation for many years. At St. Kateri, there is also a chapter for Catholic young ladies, named the Squire Roses.

Maddox Corbin said, “Father Pat was an important part of the work with the Squires and the Squire Roses. He helped to serve the youth and the Knights of Columbus. He trained my brother and me to be altar servers and serve God.”

To honor the memory of Father Pat, a priest of the Diocese of Paterson for 41 years, the Corbin brothers decided to create a prayer garden. With the help of the St. Kateri Squires, the council is leading the special project to honor Father Rice, who also served at St. Thomas More Parish, Convent Station; Holy Spirit Parish, Pequannock; St. Francis DeSales Parish, Vernon; and St. Catherine of Siena Parish, Mountain Lakes.

With the blessing of Father Tom Fallone, pastor of St. Kateri, and assistance of the St. Kateri Knights, the Corbin boys developed a prayer garden outline. The prayer garden will be built adjacent to the window near the tabernacle in St. Kateri Church and include 10 prayer stones representing the Ten Commandments, three larger paver stones representing the Holy Trinity, two stone benches, a recently retired metal processional cross, a statue of the Blessed Mother and a Celtic cross to acknowledge Father Rice’s Irish heritage.

Hayden Corbin said, “We came up with the prayer garden to honor the great work and compassion that Father Pat left at St. Kateri. We felt the garden is a good reminder for his love and compassion for this church.”

Similar to an Eagle Project in the Boy Scouts, Columbian Squires participate in the National Squire Advancement project and the St. Kateri’s Squires’ project aligns with the Catholic mission and objectives of the program.

During the first week of August, Squire members and St. Kateri Knights worked on excavating the garden space. The project cost was about $1,200, which included the pavers, stone, sand and cement. The St. Kateri Knights helped fund part of the project along with parishioners and local organizations.

Father Fallone said, “We want to thank our Squires, Knights and all of the parishioners who’ve donated time and resources to this endeavor. The influence of Father Pat’s simple, reverent and priestly life spurred our Squires to commemorate his heroic pastoral work in this way. It’s stirring when you think about it — with the whole of our salvation history having its roots in a garden, the Garden of Eden, our Father Pat Prayer Garden honors this Covenant, whole also recognizing a good and faithful priest of Jesus Christ.”

Nick Cutrone, a member of the St. Kateri Knights and chief counselor for the St. Kateri Squires, said, “Father Pat was a huge advocate for our youth leadership program with the Squires and Squire Roses. Today, he looks down from heaven with pride on the accomplishments of young men like Hayden and Maddox Corbin.”

The garden will be dedicated following a memorial Mass for Father Rice in St. Kateri Tekakwitha Church on Aug. 27 at 11 a.m.

“This is a special tribute for a great priest,” Cutrone said. “His sisters from Ireland will be here to celebrate Father Pat’s life on Aug. 27. It’s emotional to see these young people plan and put so much thought into this garden. I am floored by their faith and dedication. Through their actions and leadership Hayden and Maddox are living the Squires motto ‘esto dingus,’ which means ‘be worthy.”

For any young men and women interested in becoming a Squire, they should inquire about it from their local Knights of Columbus Council. The Squire program at St. Kateri gets involved with different projects, which include events to help the homeless.

“We wanted to become squires because we wanted to serve the community and spread the word of Christ through community service, charity and the work of the Church,” Hayden Corbin said.

Maddox Corbin added, “I’m a squire because it’s all about helping other people have a better life more than what you have, get other people more involved in charity work and improve the world.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Columbian+Squires+In+Sparta+Build+Prayer+Garden+To+Honor+Late+Pastor/2560883/330507/article.html.

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