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The Beacon The Beacon_August.11,2016 : Page 1

2 BLE SS ED S I S TER MIRI A M TERE SA ’ S RELI CS TR A N S FERRED SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS AUGUST 11, 2016 H OME F ROM WYD By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER Diocesan pilgrims return from Krakow motivated to spread Jesus’ love, mercy “My mom and my friends went crazy over it.” The Lennox sisters were two of 37 diocesan representatives from 11 parishes in the Paterson Diocese who traveled to Krakow, along with two priests — Father Owen Moran, pastor of St. Rose of Lima Parish in East Hanover, and Father Matthew Twiggs, pastor of St. John Vianney Parish in Stock -holm and St. Thomas the Apostle Parish in Oak Ridge. Anne Breslin of Great Experiences, Inc. coordi-nated the pilgrimage. Both priests concelebrated daily Mass for the diocesan pilgrims in churches in Krakow. During some of these Masses, the two diocesan priests concelebrated Mass with an array of international clergy, in-cluding two French bishops. Father Moran, who attended his first WYD, said, “This experi-ence definitely changes you. As a priest and pastor, it was amazing to see the young people come alive at the presence of the Pope and that they were challenged to live their Catholic faith.” More of a veteran to the WYD experience, Father Twiggs, who at-tended his fourth WYD, said, “The 10 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard 3 5 BI S HOP VI S IT S BENEDI C TINE MONK S IN NEWTON S I S TER S OF C HRI S TI A N C H A RITY G A THER FOR MINI S TRY D A Y 4 6-7 10 11-16 O BITUARIES V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS CLIFTON When sisters Katie and Kim Lennox dreamed of flying to some faraway land, they never could have imagined that the first plane ride they would ever take in their lives would be to see Pope Francis at World Youth Day (WYD) in Krakow, Poland. With the support of their parish community, St. Kateri Tekakwitha Church in Sparta, the Lennox sis-ters, who are 20 and 18 years old respectively, were living that dream and have had their lives changed because of the weeklong experi-ence encountering people from 187 countries and visiting beauti-ful cathedrals around the Central European country from July 26 to 31. Kim Lennox said, “I was truly inspired by this experience. When this opportunity came, my sister and I knew this was something we could not miss. Hearing the Pope speak was amazing. He is contem-porary and understands what we are going through.” Like many young people, the sisters kept in touch with family “facetiming” and shared their WYD U.S.A. Transitional Deacon Michal Tybinski, local Polish guide Tomaz, PHOTO | DANIEL POLITI Stephanie Politi and Father Owen Moran, pastor of St. Rose of Lima Parish in East Hanover, hold a U.S. flag at a World Youth Day event in Krakow, Poland. experience on social media every night. The younger Lennox sister posted a video of Pope Francis waving to her from the Pope -mobile. She garnered a lot of “likes” from that video and said, WYD on 8 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Seminarian from Hawthorne heeded several signs in vocations journey that pointed him to the priesthood [EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the third installment of a summer series on diocesan seminarians.] By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR HAWTHORNE “Where did they go?” Charles Lana had finished playing basketball with friends, when he noticed that the gold chain, cruci-fix and charm for the three theo-logical virtues disappeared from around his neck. The 19-year-old never found the chain or the charm but was surprised to find that the crucifix fell into the left pocket of his shorts. This fortu-nate discovery encouraged Lana to reflect, not only on the jewelry that he lost, but also on the new insights to his budding vocation that he gained. “The crucifix in my pocket re-minded me that Jesus is always with me. The loss of the charm for the theological virtues [repre-sented by a cross, anchor and heart] showed me that I needed to grow deeper in those virtues of faith, hope, and love,” said Lana, a 31-year-old lifelong parishioner of St. Anthony’s, Hawthorne, and a second theology student at Immaculate Conception Seminary on the campus of Seton Hall University, South Orange. Lana considers the incident of losing the chain and charm the first of many signs and experi-ences that helped him recognize that God was calling him to priesthood. These included being filled with the desire to return to Mass after taking religion courses as a Seton Hall undergraduate; deepening his prayer life, while attending Seton Hall law school and later during his law career; receiving encouragement from priests he just met; and expand-ing his involvement in his faith as a catechist and youth ministry volunteer at St. Anthony’s, he said. Although Lana would not real-ize it yet, his long vocations jour-ney started with a strong faith foundation in childhood. His par-ents, Charles, who works in logis-tics, and Diane, a homemaker, brought his two younger siblings — sister Stefanie, now 29, and brother Andrew, now 25 — and him to weekly Mass and religious education instruction at St. Anthony’s. The seminarian has SEMINARIAN on 3

Home From WYD

Cecile San Agustin

Diocesan pilgrims return from Krakow motivated to spread Jesus’ love, mercy

CLIFTON When sisters Katie and Kim Lennox dreamed of flying to some faraway land, they never could have imagined that the first plane ride they would ever take in their lives would be to see Pope Francis at World Youth Day (WYD) in Krakow, Poland.

With the support of their parish community, St. Kateri Tekakwitha Church in Sparta, the Lennox sisters, who are 20 and 18 years old respectively, were living that dream and have had their lives changed because of the weeklong experience encountering people from 187 countries and visiting beautiful cathedrals around the Central European country from July 26 to 31.

Kim Lennox said, “I was truly inspired by this experience. When this opportunity came, my sister and I knew this was something we could not miss. Hearing the Pope speak was amazing. He is contemporary and understands what we are going through.”

Like many young people, the sisters kept in touch with family “facetiming” and shared their WYD experience on social media every night. The younger Lennox sister posted a video of Pope Francis waving to her from the Pope - mobile. She garnered a lot of “likes” from that video and said, “My mom and my friends went crazy over it.”

The Lennox sisters were two of 37 diocesan representatives from 11 parishes in the Paterson Diocese who traveled to Krakow, along with two priests — Father Owen Moran, pastor of St. Rose of Lima Parish in East Hanover, and Father Matthew Twiggs, pastor of St. John Vianney Parish in Stockholm and St. Thomas the Apostle Parish in Oak Ridge. Anne Breslin of Great Experiences, Inc. coordinated the pilgrimage.

Both priests concelebrated daily Mass for the diocesan pilgrims in churches in Krakow. During some of these Masses, the two diocesan priests concelebrated Mass with an array of international clergy, including two French bishops.

Father Moran, who attended his first WYD, said, “This experience definitely changes you. As a priest and pastor, it was amazing to see the young people come alive at the presence of the Pope and that they were challenged to live their Catholic faith.”

More of a veteran to the WYD experience, Father Twiggs, who attended his fourth WYD, said, “The city of Krakow was absolutely beautiful. The people were extremely friendly and welcoming to us. I’m also grateful to the diocesan group, who were very supportive of one another and welcomed me with such hospitality.”

WYD was initiated by St. Pope John Paul II in 1985 and consists of an opening ceremony, daily catechesis, welcoming the Pope and Stations of the Cross. It culminates with a Saturday night vigil and a Sunday closing Mass.

For Father Moran, a moment he found life changing was the pilgrimage walk to the vigil site known as Campus Misericordiae. “It was about a three-mile walk with heavy backpacks that held our sleeping bags and our food for the evening. It was difficult but I thought about the refugees around the world who were displaced because of war and oppression. I reminded the young people that after this day, we all had a warm place to sleep and we thought about them in solidarity,” said Father Moran.

A youth from St. Rose of Lima who was moved by the experience, was Victoria DeTrolio, 18. “I had no idea what to expect from WYD. It was incredible to see everyone in the world come together in union for our faith and for Jesus. I want to pass that on to everyone,” she said.

She told The Beacon she plans to volunteer more, “I plan on sharing what I have with others to help me accomplish that sense of faith and put it into action.”

Father Twiggs said a highlight for him was visiting the homes of St. John Paul II and the St. Faustina. “I have a devotion to Divine Mercy,” he said, “so it was great to visit the shrine. It was amazing the amount of people around the shrine who had tremendous faith. There would be people gathered on the grass near the shrine praying and having a great time together.”

Stephanie Politi, youth minister at St. Rose, felt a great sense of togetherness and love during the pilgrimage in Krakow. “We kept saying if everywhere in the world had this same spirit, there would be peace in the world,” said Politi. “There was a great sense of joy, gratitude and pride to see our young people interacting with people from all over the world. They spoke in different languages but they were singing together and worshipping together.”

At the closing Mass, Pope Francis announced that the next WYD will take place in Panama in 2019. Many of the diocesan pilgrims agreed that they hope they can be at the World Youth Day ever for Central America.

Father Moran said, “We entrust our future to the Lord and pray that the youth of America will boldly hand on the traditions of our faith for future generations to live as we live in the love and strength of Jesus.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Home+From+WYD/2555991/328053/article.html.

Seminarian From Hawthorne Heeded Several Signs In Vocations Journey That Pointed Him To The Priesthood

Michael Wojcik

[EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the third installment of a summer series on diocesan seminarians.]

HAWTHORNE “Where did they go?” Charles Lana had finished playing basketball with friends, when he noticed that the gold chain, crucifix and charm for the three theological virtues disappeared from around his neck. The 19-year-old never found the chain or the charm but was surprised to find that the crucifix fell into the left pocket of his shorts. This fortunate discovery encouraged Lana to reflect, not only on the jewelry that he lost, but also on the new insights to his budding vocation that he gained.

“The crucifix in my pocket reminded me that Jesus is always with me. The loss of the charm for the theological virtues [represented by a cross, anchor and heart] showed me that I needed to grow deeper in those virtues of faith, hope, and love,” said Lana, a 31-year-old lifelong parishioner of St. Anthony’s, Hawthorne, and a second theology student at Immaculate Conception Seminary on the campus of Seton Hall University, South Orange.

Lana considers the incident of losing the chain and charm the first of many signs and experiences that helped him recognize that God was calling him to priesthood. These included being filled with the desire to return to Mass after taking religion courses as a Seton Hall undergraduate; deepening his prayer life, while attending Seton Hall law school and later during his law career; receiving encouragement from priests he just met; and expanding his involvement in his faith as a catechist and youth ministry volunteer at St. Anthony’s, he said.

Although Lana would not realize it yet, his long vocations journey started with a strong faith foundation in childhood. His parents, Charles, who works in logistics, and Diane, a homemaker, brought his two younger siblings — sister Stefanie, now 29, and brother Andrew, now 25 — and him to weekly Mass and religious education instruction at St. Anthony’s. The seminarian has fond memories of praying the “Our Father” and “Hail Mary” with his father before bed.

“Praying stuck with me,” Lana said. “From a young age, Mass was important to me. It was a regular part of life. I loved the sense of community — being all together. I admired the priests because I realized that they are doing something special,” he said.

In 2003, Lana was graduated from Hawthorne High School, where was named to the National Honor Society and the Spanish Honor Society. He headed to Seton Hall, where he would earn a bachelor’s degree in economics with a minor in history with an eye toward three possible career paths: as a government worker, attorney or teacher.

As he began his undergraduate studies, Lana sporadically attended Mass. His attendance had dropped off at the end of high school because of his heavy course load and busy schedule playing sports — baseball, basketball and soccer — on highschool teams. But he took a Contemporary Moral Values course with Father John Ballwe, which inspired him to return to Mass at St. Anthony’s with his mother. Then, he took other religious courses.

“I was growing in my faith,” Lana said.

With his bachelor’s degree in hand, Lana interned for five months at the Office of the Chief Counsel of Immigration and Customs Enforcement for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security in Newark. He got a taste for law by observing its attorneys making the government’s arguments in immigration, asylum and deportation cases.

Lana clerked for Kaps & Barto, Esq., a small law firm in Hackensack that handles civil cases, where he filed materials, compiled exhibits and read legal briefs. Before applying to law school, he had a brief thought about the priesthood, but quickly ignored it.

So in 2008, Lana entered Seton Hall School of Law, where he took on a demanding course load that involved long days and nights of classes and studying. In what little spare time he had, he deepened his faith, praying more everyday, including the rosary; reading and reflecting on Scripture; and watching EWTN Catholic television network.

“My thoughts of priesthood grew stronger. I was fighting it, because it was not fitting into my life plans at the moment,” said Lana, who in law school and after, got more involved at St. Anthony’s as a fifth-grade catechist and youth ministry volunteer.

Meanwhile, Lana worked as a judicial intern for the Hon. James Guida of N.J. Superior Court in Hackensack. Before earning his law degree in 2011, Lana also served as a legal intern for the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office. After law school, Lana clerked for Judge Guida. He observed juvenile and family court cases. He performed research and wrote legal briefs, complied jury instructions and reviewed pre-trial sentencing reports. Lana also told the judge — a deacon at St. Mary Parish, Rutherford — about his possible call and received encouragement.

Lana also worked as an attorney for Strasser & Associates, a civil law firm in Paramus. It was during this period after law school that two priests he did not know before gave him encouragement in his vocation. One day, at St. Elizabeth Parish, Wyckoff, a priest heard his confession and then offered this observation: “You will do great things in life as a lawyer or maybe even as a priest.” Then, a priest from Sacred Heart Parish, Lyndhurst, asked him to consider the priesthood, after watching him read Scripture at his grandfather’s funeral.

By May 2013, Lana felt the call to a priestly vocation grow much stronger. So he spoke to Father Hubert Jurjewicz, diocesan vocations director; Father Kevin Corcoran, diocesan vice chancellor; and Msgr. Raymond Kupke, St. Anthony’s pastor. He also told his parents, who “found the news difficult, but warmed up to it because they are supportive and want what’s best for me,” Lana said.

In the fall of 2013, a 28-year-old Lana entered Immaculate Conception Seminary. In addition to coursework and spiritual activities, he has undertaken several pastoral assignments, including assisting immigration attorneys at Catholic Charities in Newark, and talking and praying with residents at St. Joseph’s Home for the Elderly, Totowa. He also visited parishioners’ homes, a nursing home and religious education classes during a yearlong assignment at St. Catherine of Siena Parish, Mountain Lakes, with fellow seminarian and St. Anthony’s parishioner Dailon Lisabet.

“Father Jared [Brogan, St. Catherine’s administrator] connects with people well and is an engaging personality. People want to be around him,” Lana said.

Last summer, Lana worked at St. Anthony’s, lectoring at daily Mass, making Communion calls, conducting wake and burial services and teaching Vacation Bible School. This summer, he attended the nine-week Institute for Priestly Formation in Omaha with fellow seminarians Lisabet and Andrew Dutko.

“Charles has been involved in the life of St. Anthony’s in youth group, CCD and Vacation Bible School. He is smart but humble. He has a strong sense of responsibility and deep faith and takes his prayer life seriously,” said Father Roberto Amador, St. Anthony’s parochial vicar. “We are proud to have Charles come from our parish and enter the seminary.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Seminarian+From+Hawthorne+Heeded+Several+Signs+In+Vocations+Journey+That+Pointed+Him+To+The+Priesthood/2556021/328053/article.html.

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