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The Beacon The Beacon August 4th, 2016 : Page 1

2 CA THOLI C C H A RITIE S N A ME S 2016 CA RIT AS A W A RD RE C IPIENT S SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS AUGUST 4, 2016 B IBLE W EEK 13 7 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER S t. Peter the A postle Parish showcases life of patron through museum exhibit PARSIPPANY How well do you know the patron saint of your parish? At St. Peter the Apostle Church here through a week of Bible study and a museum-inspired exhibit, the parish gave its commu-nity the opportunity to learn about its patron St. Peter, chosen by Jesus Christ as “the rock” upon which he built his Church. BI S HOP M A KE S P AS TOR A L VI S IT TO LONG V A LLEY P A RI S H During the week of July 17 to 24, a team of parishioners from the parish’s Bible Study group vis-ited the homes of 10 parishioners to read accounts of the Bible on St. Peter’s life and to focus on the message to be “fishers of men” just as Jesus called St. Peter to be on the shores of Galilee. Msgr. Herbert Tillyer, pastor of St. Peter’s, chose this week’s Bible study theme deciding it should fo-BIBLE WEEK on 5 11 YOUTH S FROM NET C ONG, FL A NDER S TR A VEL TO C ONNE C TI C UT TO HELP THE NEEDY 8-9 12 13 14-20 Technology enables parishioners to become more involved during Mass [EDITOR’S NOTE: This is an ongoing series exploring how parishes across the Diocese are using tech nology to evangelize.] By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI V IEWPOINT O BITUARIES W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS CONSECRATION OF NEW ALTAR As part of the ritual of the conse -cration of a new altar, Bishop Serratelli prepares to cense the altar as incense rises in Our Lady Queen of the Most Holy Rosary Church in Dover July 31. The new altar was made possible through the generosity of parishioners, who filled the church to capacity and beyond for the Bishop’s pastoral visit. For story and more photos, see page 10. LONG VALLEY Parishioners have been filling St. Luke Church here with a lot more singing and pray-ing in recent years, encouraged by digital devises such as the video projectors outfitted in this rural Morris County house of worship. Today, the dynamic congrega-tion of St. Luke’s has been partici-pating more at Masses because now they can read the text of prayers and Scripture readings and lyrics of the hymns that are projected on either side of the al-tar. They also can hear the cele-brating priests much more clearly — and loudly — through a re-cently upgraded sound system, said Father Michael Drury, St. Luke’s pastor. “The people of St. Luke’s can be more fully involved in the Mass. Their singing and responses TECHNOLOGY on 4 Journey in pursuit of priesthood takes many turns for seminarian [EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the second installment of a summer series on diocesan seminarians.] By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR MONTVILLE During his senior year at DePaul Catholic High School in Wayne, Frank Lennie thought that Uncle Sam wanted him as a new recruit for the U.S. Marine Corps. But it was two priests on DePaul’s staff who helped this young parishioner of St. Pius X here consider that, in-stead, God might be calling him to a priestly vocation. Those two priests — Father Peter Clarke, former DePaul chap-lain and now the newly-named president, and Father Michael Donovan, former DePaul president and current president of Queen of Peace High School, North Arling -ton, — encouraged Lennie to con-sider entering St. Andrew’s Hall at Immaculate Conception Seminary on the campus of Seton Hall University, South Orange. He took their suggestions and now, at 24, he expects to earn a bachelor’s de-gree in philosophical theology next May. It has all been part of a vo-cations journey with many starts and stops that began with his re-ceiving his Confirmation at St. Pius X as high-school sophomore. “My soul was on fire at Confir -mation. I didn’t expect it, but when I received the holy Chrism on my forehead, the Holy Spirit came alive in me,” said Lennie — today a part-time summer helper at St. Pius X. He also attended dai-ly morning Masses in DePaul’s chapel and helped set up for school-wide Masses as a student. “I enjoyed it. I can’t pinpoint it, but I have always loved the beauty of the liturgy. The Mass unites every-thing with God in heaven.” Lennie’s vocation journey took a different turn, when he left St. Andrew’s before the end of his SEMINARIAN on 4

Bible Week

Cecile San Agustin

St. Peter the Apostle Parish showcases life of patron through museum exhibit

PARSIPPANY How well do you know the patron saint of your parish? At St. Peter the Apostle Church here through a week of Bible study and a museum-inspired exhibit, the parish gave its community the opportunity to learn about its patron St. Peter, chosen by Jesus Christ as “the rock” upon which he built his Church.

During the week of July 17 to 24, a team of parishioners from the parish’s Bible Study group visited the homes of 10 parishioners to read accounts of the Bible on St. Peter’s life and to focus on the message to be “fishers of men” just as Jesus called St. Peter to be on the shores of Galilee. Msgr. Herbert Tillyer, pastor of St. Peter’s, chose this week’s Bible study theme deciding it should focus on the parish’s patron.

Father Yojaneider Garcia, parochial vicar and coordinator of the second annual event, said, “Like in the passage of Luke 10:1-20, Jesus sent the Apostles to preach, we sent couples to parish families and to evangelize through the Bible.”

Families whose homes were visited received preparation a month before the visitation. They learned about the accounts of St. Peter’s life in the Bible. Some of these accounts include Jesus calling Peter to be the first Apostle, Peter witnessing Jesus walk on water, Peter’s denial of Jesus and the account of Jesus giving Peter “the keys of the kingdom of heaven.” Deacon Bob Lang led the Bible study for English-speaking parishioners at the parish while Father Garcia led the Spanish-speaking study.

During the third weekend in July, these same stories were created visually as museum- like displays throughout St. Peter’s church hall, which was themed “St. Peter the Apostle’s Life.” Father Garcia said, “We wanted to provide a clear picture of the apostle and how to understand some practices in our Church and where they came from. We wanted to also show how St. Peter helps encourage us to be true disciples of Jesus.”

When visitors first entered the exhibit, they were welcomed by a life size papermache statue of St. Peter in a fishing boat and Jesus on shore, who is calling St. Peter to be one of his apostles. The exhibits were created by the Garcia and Naranjo families, parishioners of St. Peter’s, Angelita Osorio, art and environment director of the parish, and several volunteers of the parish sharing their ideas and artistic talents.

In total, there were 14 stations focusing on the Bible stories featuring St. Peter and some historical background on the apostle. One of the stations focused on the symbols of St. Peter — keys, a fishing net, a rooster and a rock. Another station focused on St. Peter’s martyrdom. He chose to be crucified upside down feeling unworthy to die like Christ. There was also information on the history of the popes with St. Peter as the first pope. In remembrance of the event, each person was given a prayer card of St. Peter with a novena of the saint.

The parish hosted a similar event with exhibits last November marking National Bible Week featuring St. Paul the Apostle and his conversion story. The display room attracts many visitors from many neighboring parishes. Next year, the parish will continue the weeklong Bible study and focus on the Blessed Mother.

Father Garcia said, “We can be inspired if we understand the beautiful life of the Apostle Peter. Jesus did not choose professional people to be part of his group. Peter is someone we have similarities to — he experienced a loss of faith when Jesus invited him to walk on water and he denied Jesus three times. Like Peter, Jesus also gives us a special mission. Jesus looks at our heart, not our ability to do something with our shortcomings.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Bible+Week/2551031/326372/article.html.

Technology Enables Parishioners To Become More Involved During Mass

Michael Wojcik

[EDITOR’S NOTE: This is an ongoing series exploring how parishes across the Diocese are using technology to evangelize.]

LONG VALLEY Parishioners have been filling St. Luke Church here with a lot more singing and praying in recent years, encouraged by digital devises such as the video projectors outfitted in this rural Morris County house of worship.

Today, the dynamic congregation of St. Luke’s has been participating more at Masses because now they can read the text of prayers and Scripture readings and lyrics of the hymns that are projected on either side of the altar. They also can hear the celebrating priests much more clearly — and loudly — through a recently upgraded sound system, said Father Michael Drury, St. Luke’s pastor.

“The people of St. Luke’s can be more fully involved in the Mass. Their singing and responses to the prayers are better. It’s more uplifting,” said Father Drury, who can celebrate Masses by praying the words of the liturgy that are projected above the church entrance. “It’s great to utilize all this wonderful technology.”

Throughout the Paterson Diocese, parishes and schools have been harnessing the limitless power and possibilities of incorporating more of digital audio-video technology into their worship spaces. They have employed projectors, video cameras, television monitors, live video streaming and graphics to enhance worship and parishioner participation and sense of community.

A generous financial gift from a parishioner enabled St. Luke’s to install projectors for the front and rear walls of the church; a TV monitor for the cry room, so families outside the worship space can participate; and an upgraded sound system — a project that started last year. Also, the parish has displayed quotes on the screen from Pope Francis, video and even an article from The Beacon during announcements. For the future, St. Luke’s hopes to stream announcements at the bottom of the projected text and even be able to show videos to couples in marriage preparation, Father Drury said.

“The technology is great because young people especially are more visual and are more attentive [when hearing and listening to it],” said Father Drury, who noted that the text for each Mass gets inputted and then uploaded into computers prior to that Mass. “The possibilities of all this technology are endless,” he said.

Nearby in Chester, St. Lawrence the Martyr Parish has been displaying the text to prayers and Scripture readings and lyrics to hymns on two 90-inch flat-screen Tvs on either side of the altar. A powerful piece of software, Media Shout, sends the text wirelessly to the screens, which are visible to the congregation. Often, the parish incorporates background graphics that are appropriate to themes in the Mass, such as the Women at the Well, said Bill McCormick, a St. Lawrence parishioner and project manager.

St. Lawrence’s TV screens also have shown the video of Bishop Serratelli speaking about the Bishop’s Annual Appeal — from the new Diocesan website — and PowerPoint slide presentations about the year-end finances from the parish finance committee, McCormick said.

Similar to St. Luke’s, St. Lawrence also uploads the text before the Masses. Parishioners in the Spanish-language Mass and young persons’ Mass — which includes YouTube videos that display the lyrics to contemporary Christian songs — input the text for those liturgies. For the Masses, McCormick and his wife, Jeanne, operate a desktop computer with a powerful graphics program, located in the choir area of the church, he said.

“The singing has increased. It [the technology] has enhanced the liturgy without making it distracting and showy. It also helps those parishioners who are hard of hearing,” said McCormick, who said that the video system — run on a high-speed fiber-optic cable — was installed two years ago.

Also incorporating technology in the worship space have been Mary Help of Christians Academy, North Haledon, which installed TV screens on either side of the altar in its chapel, and Our Lady of Consolation Parish, Wayne.

At St. Matthew the Apostle Parish, Randolph, an upgraded high-definition video camera was installed in the worship space last year to give viewers a full shot of the altar during Mass. Sometimes, parishioners have to sit in the parish’s Heritage Hall when the church experiences an overflow crowd and view the Mass through doors that open to the worship space. Video technology there helps these faithful see the altar that they would not be able to see otherwise. The parish’s nursery also contains a TV monitor, so families can view the Mass, said Lesile Doherty, parish business manager.

Also, Suzanne Johnson, a St. Matthew’s parishioner, edits a video recording of one of the Masses each week on the service Stream Machine and posts it on the parish website for parishioners who were unable to attend Mass or want to review parts of it, including the homily. In addition, the parish can post videos of other liturgies and spiritual activities, such as Confirmation or the Living Stations of the Cross, Doherty said.

“The technology enhances St. Matthew’s Masses and sense of community because everyone wants to be a part of the liturgy, no matter where he or she is sitting or standing,” Doherty. “We need to embrace technology.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Technology+Enables+Parishioners+To+Become+More+Involved+During+Mass/2551034/326372/article.html.

Journey In Pursuit Of Priesthood Takes Many Turns For Seminarian

Michael Wojcik

[EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the second installment of a summer series on diocesan seminarians.]

MONTVILLE During his senior year at DePaul Catholic High School in Wayne, Frank Lennie thought that Uncle Sam wanted him as a new recruit for the U.S. Marine Corps. But it was two priests on DePaul’s staff who helped this young parishioner of St. Pius X here consider that, instead, God might be calling him to a priestly vocation.

Those two priests — Father Peter Clarke, former DePaul chaplain and now the newly-named president, and Father Michael Donovan, former DePaul president and current president of Queen of Peace High School, North Arling - ton, — encouraged Lennie to consider entering St. Andrew’s Hall at Immaculate Conception Seminary on the campus of Seton Hall University, South Orange. He took their suggestions and now, at 24, he expects to earn a bachelor’s degree in philosophical theology next May. It has all been part of a vocations journey with many starts and stops that began with his receiving his Confirmation at St. Pius X as high-school sophomore.

“My soul was on fire at Confir - mation. I didn’t expect it, but when I received the holy Chrism on my forehead, the Holy Spirit came alive in me,” said Lennie — today a part-time summer helper at St. Pius X. He also attended daily morning Masses in DePaul’s chapel and helped set up for school-wide Masses as a student. “I enjoyed it. I can’t pinpoint it, but I have always loved the beauty of the liturgy. The Mass unites everything with God in heaven.”

Lennie’s vocation journey took a different turn, when he left St. Andrew’s before the end of his freshman year. He attributed this to his lack of discipline and his lack of confidence in being able to handle the coursework. So for the next four years, he continued discerning, while holding down a series of “real world” jobs, including in construction and day care. During this period, Lennie also took a semester course at Seton Hall with the intention of returning to academics one day, he said.

“I had to make my faith my own. I had to be more deliberate — waking up on my own and deciding to pray. I started seeking Christ instead of Christ seeking me,” said Lennie, who started volunteering with St. Pius’ youth ministry, during his hiatus. “I grew as a teacher. I was able present the faith at the kids’ level. People were telling me that I had a gift for bringing people to Christ,” he said.

Finally, Lennie decided to return to St. Andrew’s in 2014, after having spoken to Msgr. Raymond Kupke, pastor of St. Anthony Parish, Hawthorne, and diocesan archivist. The priest helped boost the young man’s selfconfidence in being able to tackle the coursework and helped him recognize his gifts and talents that could serve him well in the priesthood. Since returning to St. Andrew’s, Lennie’s academic performance and self-confidence improved greatly, Msgr. Kupke said.

Lennie’s vocation journey may have started with receiving the “fire” of the Holy Spirit at Confirmation, but his faith formation began firmly in childhood. His parents, Frank, a roofer and construction worker, and mother, Colleen, a bartender, from Parsippany, were not religious, when he was growing up. So his grandparents, Raymond and Patricia Williams, would take him to Mass at St. Pius X. He attended and was graduated from the parish school.

“In religion class, I was also quick to ask — and answer — questions, because I was interested in the subject and knew a lot about it. Some of the teachers suggested that I consider becoming a priest, but I wasn’t really thinking about it,” said Lennie, who was an altar server at St. Pius X with his brother, 20-year-old Raymond, now a student at County College of Morris, Randolph. “As an altar server, I got to see the priests close up and see what they do at Mass.”

Lennie also watched the priests at DePaul up close celebrating Masses daily in the chapel. As a senior, he earned the Father Sylva Award for Service for helping set up for school-wide Masses. During that time, both Father Clarke and Father Donovan asked him to consider entering St. Andrew’s, Lennie said.

“I was about to sign up for he Marines during my senior year, but I thought about it [the priests’ suggestion]. I liked the idea of going to St. Andrew’s, because my grand - father was a season ticket holder for Seton Hall basketball for 50 years,” said Lennie, who first told his mother about his call to a priestly vocation. “She was surprised but happy that I wasn’t going to risk my life as a Marine. My father gave the typical answer: ‘If it makes you happy, then I’m happy,’ ” he said.

Since his return to St. Andrew’s, Lennie also has been living out his life in Christ at St. Pius X for the past two summers. This year, he has been helping clean the parish school, serving at funerals, and performing “odds and ends,” at the request of the pastor, Father Mark Olenowski. In June, Lennie spoke about how to live a life of prayer during the annual “Quo Vadis Days” discernment retreat for young men, sponsored by the diocesan Vocations Office.

Msgr. Kupke called Lennie’s time away from seminary “an important break for him to come to grips with what God was calling him to do and how he would respond to that.”

“Frank has been more focused since he returned to St. Andrew’s,” Msgr. Kupke said. “He has a great pastoral heart and great pastoral sense about him. He will make a wonderful parish priest,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Journey+In+Pursuit+Of+Priesthood+Takes+Many+Turns+For+Seminarian/2551039/326372/article.html.

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