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The Beacon The Beacon July 28 2016 : Page 1

9 INTERIM PRE S IDENT FOR MORRI S CA THOLI C H. S . N A MED SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS JULY 28, 2016 ‘P OKÉMON G O :’ TO C HURCH ? 10 5 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Catholics find evangelization opportunities in midst of national mobile gaming craze By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR S I S TER ENTER S BETHLEHEM HERMIT A GE IN C HE S TER BI S HOP M A KE S P AS TOR A L VI S IT TO S T. A NDREW’ S P A RI S H IN C LIFTON 8 BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI C ONSECRATION OF N EW A LTAR O BITUARIES V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS Bishop Serratelli censes the new altar in Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, Swartswood, that he consecrated during the Mass he celebrated on his pastoral visit there July 24. The new altar is part of extensive renovations recently made to the Sussex County church’s worship space. For story and more photos, see page 2. 4 6-7 10 11-16 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS MADISON Suddenly, young peo-ple have been appearing mysteri-ously in front of the large white statue of Jesus that stands tall on the spacious front lawn of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Evangelization Center at Bayley-Ellard here. Periodically, they have been spotted holding up their Smartphones toward the statue, while looking into the screens and tapping them furiously. No, these young people aren’t taking pictures of the statue of Jesus — as striking and beautiful as it is — but playing the latest mobile video game to sweep the U.S.: Pokémon Go. It has netted about 21 million users since its July 6 debut, crowning it the most popular app in the world’s history. The game’s objective — to capture small, digitalized crea-tures (Pokémon) in real geographi-cal locations — has prompted droves of players to visit countless designated churches, businesses and other landmarks in search for them. Many priests, youth groups and other ministers, including many in the Paterson Diocese, have been viewing these random encounters as possible opportuni-ties to evangelize youth and young adults — what some peo-ple have called “Pokevangelization.” St. Paul’s hasn’t reported any of these players yet making the trek from the statue of Jesus, which peers over the wall out in front, up the walkway and into the offices of the evangelization center. Yet Caitlin Fitzgerald, St. Paul’s communications and infor-mation coordinator, remains hope-ful that someone might make that connection “This [Pokémon Go] could be beneficial. It might appeal to the unchurched. At St. Paul’s, they can come for the Pokémon, but stay for the events and for Jesus. We have much to offer,” said Fitzgerald, who has not yet had the opportunity to play the game. A brief survey of sites by The POKÉMON GO on 2 Seminarian’s story: From farmer in Poland to preparing for priesthood Photo, Story by MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR ROCKAWAY When Mateusz Darlak, a dioce-san seminarian, accompanies priests of St. Cecilia and Sacred Heart parishes here on pastoral visits to local hospitals, he expects to ask patients questions, such “How are you do-ing?” But the Polish native has been surprised that they ask him probing questions, such as “Why would someone so young want to be-come a priest?” Often, the 24-year-old Darlak, a third-year theology student at Holy Apostles Seminary in Cromwell, Conn., does not know how to an-swer that question but he has a captivating vo-cation story to tell. This whirlwind tale starts where he grew up: with his family on a small farm in southeastern Poland. His journey took him after high school to work in the Champagne region of France for more than a year. Then, Darlak re-turned to Poland, where he studied at an English-Language seminary, before deciding to move to the Paterson Diocese in the U.S. about two years ago. “I feel happy living in the U.S.,” said Darlak, who has been serving a Mateusz Darlak summer pastoral assign-ment at St. Cecilia and Sacred Heart. “Here [in the New York metropolitan area], I see people from all around the world. Everybody is so open to discovery and things that are new. I have learned more about the world here,” he said. Back in Poland, Darlak learned values of life and faith from his family in the small village of Gnojnica, about 60 miles from Krakow, one of country’s major cities and the site of World Youth Day. Early every morning, he and his two younger siblings, Monika — now a mar-ried mother of a son — and Marcin, would get up to work with their mother, Bozena, a home-maker, and father Wieslaw, a farmer. They raised pigs, chickens and ducks, and grew pota-toes, wheat and vegetables for themselves and for trade with their neighbors, Darlak said. “Farm life was a good experience. I learned to take up the responsibility of growing food and caring for animals — not only for myself, but also for my family, even through difficult times, such as storms and drought. It’s hard work everyday,” he said. As a child, Darlak also learned to hear God’s call to priesthood at his home parish, SEMINARIAN on 3

‘Pokémon Go:’ To Church?

Michael Wojcik

Catholics find evangelization opportunities in midst of national mobile gaming craze

MADISON Suddenly, young people have been appearing mysteriously in front of the large white statue of Jesus that stands tall on the spacious front lawn of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Evangelization Center at Bayley- Ellard here. Periodically, they have been spotted holding up their Smartphones toward the statue, while looking into the screens and tapping them furiously.

No, these young people aren’t taking pictures of the statue of Jesus — as striking and beautiful as it is — but playing the latest mobile video game to sweep the U. S.: Pokémon Go. It has netted about 21 million users since its July 6 debut, crowning it the most popular app in the world’s history. The game’s objective — to capture small, digitalized creatures (Pokémon) in real geographical locations — has prompted droves of players to visit countless designated churches, businesses and other landmarks in search for them. Many priests, youth groups and other ministers, including many in the Paterson Diocese, have been viewing these random encounters as possible opportunities to evangelize youth and young adults — what some people have called “Pokevangelization.”

St. Paul’s hasn’t reported any of these players yet making the trek from the statue of Jesus, which peers over the wall out in front, up the walkway and into the offices of the evangelization center. Yet Caitlin Fitzgerald, St. Paul’s communications and information coordinator, remains hopeful that someone might make that connection

“This [Pokémon Go] could be beneficial. It might appeal to the unchurched. At St. Paul’s, they can come for the Pokémon, but stay for the events and for Jesus. We have much to offer,” said Fitzgerald, who has not yet had the opportunity to play the game.

A brief survey of sites by The Beacon in the Diocese showed that many parishes have been unsuspectingly designated as PokeStops, where players can find the tools they need to catch the Pokémon, and Gyms, where they can test their skills against other creatures in the game. Sites include: St. Anthony of Padua Parish, Passaic (misspelled on the app as “Dadua”) and Our Lady of the Holy Angels, Little Falls, in two outside locations: at a statue of the Blessed Mother on the side of the church and its Shrine of Our Lady of the Highway facing Route 23. The crucifix above the altar at St. Philip the Apostle Church, Clifton, hosts a “module,” where players can collect multiple creatures as a group. Gyms can be found in front of St. James of the Marches Parish, Totowa, and at Notre Dame of Mount Carmel Parish, Cedar Knolls, which posted a photo of the location on Facebook.

Based on a popular gaming franchise developed by Nintendo in the 1990s, Pokémon Go utilizes augmented reality, which enables players to endeavor capturing the computer animated creatures, while looking at the actual location through their Smartphone’s camera. The app’s technology incorporates GPS and Google Maps that allows players to find the locations for Pokémon — short for “pocket monsters” — and move around this semi-virtual world.

Parishes across the U.S. have been trying to develop ways to engage these visiting players of a game that has been praised for building community, as well as for coaxing people out of their homes and inspiring them to walk around their neighborhoods. Some parishes have hung up banners or have approached gamers personally to welcome them to Mass or their events for young people. The Department of New Evangelization of Green Bay Diocese in Wisconsin issued a guide in response to the Pokémon craze, “A Parish Primer: Responding to Parish Questions and Concerns,” according to Catholic News Service.

In Cedar Knolls, Notre Dame Parish learned that it was the site of a Gym from teens who assisted at its Vacation Bible School said Christina Folan, who serves as the parish’s communications support.

“Notre Dame is a very welcoming parish. Whatever brings people here [is wonderful]. We need to be intentional with all our opportunities [to evangelize],” said Folan, who posted the photo and announcement on Facebook that the church is the site of a Gym. She added words of welcome to the players: “Well, wherever you are, wherever you’ve been, come journey with us!”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/%E2%80%98Pok%C3%A9mon+Go%3A%E2%80%99+To+Church%3F/2545574/324599/article.html.

Seminarian’s Story: From Farmer In Poland To Preparing For Priesthood

Michael Wojcik

ROCKAWAY When Mateusz Darlak, a diocesan seminarian, accompanies priests of St. Cecilia and Sacred Heart parishes here on pastoral visits to local hospitals, he expects to ask patients questions, such “How are you doing?” But the Polish native has been surprised that they ask him probing questions, such as “Why would someone so young want to become a priest?”

Often, the 24-year-old Darlak, a third-year theology student at Holy Apostles Seminary in Cromwell, Conn., does not know how to answer that question but he has a captivating vocation story to tell. This whirlwind tale starts where he grew up: with his family on a small farm in southeastern Poland. His journey took him after high school to work in the Champagne region of France for more than a year. Then, Darlak returned to Poland, where he studied at an English- Language seminary, before deciding to move to the Paterson Diocese in the U. S. about two years ago.

“I feel happy living in the U.S.,” said Darlak, who has been serving a summer pastoral assignment at St. Cecilia and Sacred Heart. “Here [in the New York metropolitan area], I see people from all around the world. Everybody is so open to discovery and things that are new. I have learned more about the world here,” he said.

Back in Poland, Darlak learned values of life and faith from his family in the small village of Gnojnica, about 60 miles from Krakow, one of country’s major cities and the site of World Youth Day. Early every morning, he and his two younger siblings, Monika — now a married mother of a son — and Marcin, would get up to work with their mother, Bozena, a homemaker, and father Wieslaw, a farmer. They raised pigs, chickens and ducks, and grew potatoes, wheat and vegetables for themselves and for trade with their neighbors, Darlak said.

“Farm life was a good experience. I learned to take up the responsibility of growing food and caring for animals — not only for myself, but also for my family, even through difficult times, such as storms and drought. It’s hard work everyday,” he said.

As a child, Darlak also learned to hear God’s call to priesthood at his home parish,Ss. Peter & Paul Parish in the town of Zagorzyce, a seven-minute walk from his home village. Soon, he started serving at the altar everyday at 6:30 a.m. Mass — the beginning of a habit of attending daily Mass that he continued for about 15 years, Darlak said.

“I had a calling [to a priestly vocation] enough to wake up at 5:30 each morning,” said Darlak, who, early on, learned about the faith at the feet of his parents, who led family prayer after dinner, and specifically from his mother, who would take them to special Masses, as well as litanies and the praying of the rosary.

At Ss. Peter & Paul, Darlak also learned more about the faith from Father Kazimierz Marek, who started as a parochial vicar and later was named pastor. He taught the young man preparation for First Holy Communion. At 12, Darlak became the youngest lector in his diocese after completing a five-week course.

“Father Kazimierz was my priest, spiritual father and teacher,” said Darlak, who took a year off after high school. He attended a retreat and then moved to France, where he worked in a factory that produced champagne — acting on the childhood lesson of providing financially for the family and his future seminary education. “I watched bottles go by and had time to think, read and reflect but I missed going to daily Mass, because of a shortage of priests there.”

After more than a year, Darlak returned to Poland, where he told his surprised parents about his decision to enter Ss. Cyril & Methods Seminary, an Englishlanguage seminary in Krakow. He finished his philosophy studies in 2014 and moved to the Paterson Diocese instead of acting on his original plan to live in Michigan — this after speaking to Father Hubert Jurjewicz, diocesan vocations director, on one of his visits to Krakow.

After arriving in the U.S., Darlak took English-as-a-Second-Language classes at Rutgers University, Newark. Last summer, he served with three other Polish seminarians at Holy Family Parish Florham Park, under the leadership of Father Fredrick Walters, the former pastor, who recently retired.

This summer at St. Cecilia and Sacred Heart, Darlak has been experiencing a busy time for the parishes. The dynamic faith communities have embarked in an extensive renovation of St. Cecilia Church and have been combining the two parish schools into Divine Mercy Academy, set to open in September. He prepares for and assists at Mass, opens and closes the churches and has accompanied on hospital visits the parish’s three priests: Father Sigmund “Zig” Peplowski, pastor; and Father Marcin Michalowski and Father Mateusz Jasniewicz, parochial vicars, who also are Polish natives.

“Father Zig can have many things going on, but he will take time to talk to me about what’s going on in the parish,” said Darlak, who anticipates being called to priestly ordination in 2018. “Father Zig is a spiritual father and gives totally of himself to what his is doing. He and the parochial vicars are good teachers, who have given me insights about their experiences being priests,” he said.

Father Peplowski praised Darlak, calling him an “outgoing young man, who has made many friends in the parish and is willing to get involved in parish activities and liturgy.” The pastor also described the seminarian as a “joyful and a spiritual young man, which is evident by his prayer life.”

Darlak has been praying in anticipation of World Youth Day [WYD], that is taking place this week in Krakow with Pope Francis. The seminarian has been taking an online course, which prevented him from returning to his homeland. But Darlak expects to watch TV coverage and receive texts on his phone from friends who will attend the historic event.

“World Youth Day will be an exciting moment because it will take place during the Jubilee Year of Mercy and because Pope Francis will come to the city of St. John Paul II [former archbishop of Krakow], who is founder [of WYD]. The late Pope was a source of hope and strength in my own vocations experience,” said Darlak, who was able to see Pope Francis in Washington, D.C., during his first visit to the U.S. last September

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Seminarian%E2%80%99s+Story%3A+From+Farmer+In+Poland+To+Preparing+For+Priesthood/2545580/324599/article.html.

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