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The Beacon Beacon July 7 2016 : Page 1

SUSSEX 3 BE AC ON C OLUMNI S T WIN S FIR S T PL AC E A W A RD PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS JULY 7, 2016 10 2 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Young men discern their vocation at annual Quo Vadis diocesan retreat ranged in age from their teens to their 20s, explored God’s call — as a priest, religious, married person NEWTON It’s one thing to learn or single person. They followed a about the priesthood by thumbing busy schedule of activities, which through a pamphlet from the included daily Mass, prayer, Expo -diocesan vocations office or a reli-si tion of the Blessed Sacrament, gious order filled with descriptions talks on vocations and the priest-and photos of priests hood by Bishop celebrating Mass and Serratelli, clergy and caring for the poor. seminarians and time This is a But Krzysztof Tyszko for fellowship and serious group quiet reflection. of Holy Rosary Parish, Passaic, pre -“Quo Vadis has of young men fers to learn more been the place, where about priestly life by … Several I could take the next speaking with priests participants step [in discernment and seminarians of of the priesthood]. I the Paterson Diocese. have gone could talk with priests From June 29 to and seminarians, who onto pursue July 1, Tyszko, a were all at different diocesan seminarian, the priest -stages in their lives, and 37 other young about their experi-hood. It is men from the Church ences, which were bearing fruit.’ positive. It’s not like of Paterson got the opportunity to see — F ATHER J ARED B ROGAN flyers about the priests and seminari-priest hood,” said 19-ans up close during year old Tyszko, a the Quo Vadis Days 2016 discern-five-time veteran of Quo Vadis, ment retreat, guided by the theme who finished his first year at St. “The Universal Call to Holiness,” at Andrew’s College Seminary of Sacred Heart Spirituality Center Immaculate Conception Seminary here. These young men, who at Seton Hall University, South NE WS EDIT OR By MICHAEL WOJCIK PRIE S T FIND S HOME FOR NIE C E A T A LEX A NDER HOU S E ‘QUO VADIS’ Young men pray during a Mass celebrated by Bishop Serratelli BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI ‘ at Quo Vadis Days, the Diocese’s annual discernment retreat, which was held this year from June 29 to July 1 at Sacred Heart Spirituality Center, Newton. Praying during the Mass in the center’s chapel are (from left): Cesar Jaramillo, a diocesan seminarian, who studies at the North American College, Rome; Juan Quiceno of St. Vincent Martyr Parish, Madison; and Nicholas Burbano of St. Michael Parish, Netcong. FR A N C I SCA N S I S TER S 8 M A RK S ILVER JUBILEE S 6-7 10 11-16 16 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS Y OUTH Orange. “I’ve always thought about priesthood. I’m at peace with it [the decision]. I’ve always had a devotion to the Blessed Sacrament. That I might be able to consecrate the Body and Blood of Christ is mind-blowing. To be that close to Jesus would be amazing,” he said. During the retreat, participants also got time to socialize and en-gage in friendly competition play-ing sports while taking in the bu-colic beauty of the woodlands that surround the spirituality center. All the while, they engaged in enlight-ening conversations. Thursday af-ternoon, Bishop Serratelli visited the young men, celebrating Mass, joining them for a cookout arran -ged by the Knights of Columbus and inviting them to ask him ques-tions about his vocation and the priesthood during a special session. The diocesan Voca tions Office or-ganized the Quo Vadis retreat, which in Latin means, “Where are you going?” “Bishop Serratelli supports and encourages vocations in the Dio -cese and enjoys praying with Quo Vadis participants. He is open to all questions. The Bishop is some-one that the young men can relate QUO VADIS on 9 Clifton Knights host Holy Hour, Mass for religious liberty By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER CLIFTON Joining together to pray for life and liberty, the Knights of Columbus, Regina Mundi Council 3969 here, hosted a Mass and Holy Hour June 30 in St. Andrew the Apostle Church here in sup-port of the U.S. Bishop’s Fortnight for Freedom campaign. The campaign took place from June 21 — the vigil of the Feasts of St. John Fisher and St. Thomas More — to July 4, Independence Day. It has been held for the past five years and dioceses around the country arrange special events to highlight the importance of de-fending religious liberty. This year’s theme was “Witnesses to Faith.” Father Richard Kilcomons, pas-tor of St. Andrew’s, was main cele-brant of the Mass and delivered the homily. A Holy Hour then fol-lowed with Adoration of the Bles -sed Sacrament and Benedic tion followed by a talk by Father Philip Michael Tangorra, assistant coordi-nator of evangelization at St. Paul’s Inside the Walls in Madison. In his homily, Father Kilcomons spoke about the Fortnight to Freedom campaign and said, “During this 14-day period, Cath -olics and all people of faith are once again called upon to engage in the national campaign of prayer, education and activism for the preservation of religious liber-ty. This year’s theme focuses on the lives of women, men and chil-dren of faith from all over the world who have been defenders of their faith and courageous in extraordinary ways.” Father Kilcomons noted reli-gious liberty goes back to the Apostles. Ten of them were mar-tyred for the faith. He also spoke about martyrs today including Christians in the Middle East who are facing persecution by militant groups such as ISIS. “The best way we can defend our religious freedom is to practice our faith openly, for religious free-dom is a gift from God — a free-dom we must protect at all costs, just as the martyrs and the saints did for us,” said Father Kilcomons. During the Holy Hour, Father Tangorra spoke about religious lib-erty in the context of freedom. “Religious liberty is not something merely for Christians, not merely an issue that Catholics deal with, KNIGHTS on 4

Young Men Discern Their Vocation At Annual Quo Vadis Diocesan Retreat

Michael Wojcik

NEWTON It’s one thing to learn about the priesthood by thumbing through a pamphlet from the diocesan vocations office or a religious order filled with descriptions and photos of priests celebrating Mass and caring for the poor. But Krzysztof Tyszko of Holy Rosary Parish, Passaic, prefers to learn more about priestly life by speaking with priests and seminarians of the Paterson Diocese.

From June 29 to July 1, Tyszko, a diocesan seminarian, and 37 other young men from the Church of Paterson got the opportunity to see priests and seminarians up close during the Quo Vadis Days 2016 discernment retreat, guided by the theme “The Universal Call to Holiness,” at Sacred Heart Spirituality Center here. These young men, who ranged in age from their teens to their 20s, explored God’s call — as a priest, religious, married person or single person. They followed a busy schedule of activities, which included daily Mass, prayer, Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, talks on vocations and the priesthood by Bishop Serratelli, clergy and seminarians and time for fellowship and quiet reflection.

“Quo Vadis has been the place, where I could take the next step [in discernment of the priesthood]. I could talk with priests and seminarians, who were all at different stages in their lives, about their experiences, which were positive. It’s not like flyers about the priest hood,” said 19- year old Tyszko, a five-time veteran of Quo Vadis, who finished his first year at St. Andrew’s College Seminary of Immaculate Conception Seminary at Seton Hall University, South Orange. “I’ve always thought about priesthood. I’m at peace with it [the decision]. I’ve always had a devotion to the Blessed Sacrament. That I might be able to consecrate the Body and Blood of Christ is mind-blowing. To be that close to Jesus would be amazing,” he said.

During the retreat, participants also got time to socialize and engage in friendly competition playing sports while taking in the bucolic beauty of the woodlands that surround the spirituality center. All the while, they engaged in enlightening conversations. Thursday afternoon, Bishop Serratelli visited the young men, celebrating Mass, joining them for a cookout arranged by the Knights of Columbus and inviting them to ask him questions about his vocation and the priesthood during a special session. The diocesan Vocations Office organized the Quo Vadis retreat, which in Latin means, “Where are you going?”

“Bishop Serratelli supports and encourages vocations in the Diocese and enjoys praying with Quo Vadis participants. He is open to all questions. The Bishop is someone that the young men can relate to — one of the guys,” said Father Jared Brogan, an assistant vocations director and administrator of St. Catherine of Siena Parish, Mountain Lakes. He ran the annual retreat with Father Edgar Rivera, also an assistant vocation director and pastor of St. Anthony of Padua Parish, Passaic.

Helping out at Quo Vadis were seven priests — including a few of the newly ordained — and eight diocesan seminarians. Throughout the retreat, several seminarians delivered talks about aspects of faith and vocation. They were “Vocation: Universal Call to Holiness and Love” by Cesar Jaramillo of the North American College, Rome; “Living Out That Call Now” by Tyszko; “Four Types of Vocation” by Wade Trainor of St. Andrew’s; “Mary” by Timothy Hughes of St. Andrew’s; and “Prayer and Discernment” by Francis Lennie of St. Andrew’s. Participants also joined in small and large group discussions about various topics and were encouraged to go to Confession from the priests available.

“This is a serious group of young men this year at Quo Vadis. Many of them have attended retreats in the past. Several participants have gone onto pursue the priesthood. It is bearing fruit,” Father Brogan said. “More than wanting these men to think about the priesthood, we want them to grow as Christian men and grow closer to God. We want them to be aware of His presence in their lives and that He has a plan for them,” he said.

The retreat at Sacred Heart Spirituality Center, operated by the Salesian Sisters, also encouraged participants to reflect on the “universal call to holiness:” how we are called to be holy and how to live that out. We are all called to become saints and attain that in a different way.”

The young men used the quiet time to put down their cell phones and focus on God and one another, said Father Brogan, who also acknowledged the support of the participants’ parents and pastors.

In his talk on “Prayer and Discernment,” Lennie encouraged participants to develop a rich prayer life to help them hear God’s call. We “must “have hearts with ears for Christ’s word” and, as St. Paul wrote, “must pray without ceasing.” Priests usually engage in morning, evening and nightly prayer; have a special devotion to Mary, who teaches them to “surrender to God for all things” and look to the example of the saints, such as Joseph, who “teaches them to be holy men of God,” he said.

“Discerning is not without prayer. Seek out your spiritual director to help you understand what the Lord is leading you to do. The Mass allows us to remain close to God,” Lennie said. “When you pray, do not approach God with fear. He wants us to be open with our thoughts and feelings,” he said.

In fact, 17-year-old Andrew Echavarria’s experience at last year’s Quo Vadis encouraged him to embark on an active prayer life. The parishioner of Holy Rosary, Dover, said that he recognizes that priests engage in many spiritual activities, such as Eucharistic Adoration, Liturgy of the Hours and many forms of personal prayer.

“I have felt the call to priesthood since I was young. I’ve always enjoyed going to Mass,” said Echavarria, who noted that several of the talks during Quo Vadis have answered many of his questions about priesthood. “I want to be a priest because I’m like my mother: I like to help people who feel down and unhappy. But I realize now that it’s not whether I want to be a priest, it’s whether God wants that,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Young+Men+Discern+Their+Vocation+At+Annual+Quo+Vadis+Diocesan+Retreat/2527853/318424/article.html.

Clifton Knights Host Holy Hour, Mass For Religious Liberty

Cecile San Agustin

CLIFTON Joining together to pray for life and liberty, the Knights of Columbus, Regina Mundi Council 3969 here, hosted a Mass and Holy Hour June 30 in St. Andrew the Apostle Church here in support of the U.S. Bishop’s Fortnight for Freedom campaign.

The campaign took place from June 21 — the vigil of the Feasts of St. John Fisher and St. Thomas More — to July 4, Independence Day. It has been held for the past five years and dioceses around the country arrange special events to highlight the importance of defending religious liberty. This year’s theme was “Witnesses to Faith.”

Father Richard Kilcomons, pastor of St. Andrew’s, was main celebrant of the Mass and delivered the homily. A Holy Hour then followed with Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and Benediction followed by a talk by Father Philip Michael Tangorra, assistant coordinator of evangelization at St. Paul’s Inside the Walls in Madison.

In his homily, Father Kilcomons spoke about the Fortnight to Freedom campaign and said, “During this 14-day period, Catholics and all people of faith are once again called upon to engage in the national campaign of prayer, education and activism for the preservation of religious liberty. This year’s theme focuses on the lives of women, men and children of faith from all over the world who have been defenders of their faith and courageous in extraordinary ways.”

Father Kilcomons noted religious liberty goes back to the Apostles. Ten of them were martyred for the faith. He also spoke about martyrs today including Christians in the Middle East who are facing persecution by militant groups such as ISIS.

“The best way we can defend our religious freedom is to practice our faith openly, for religious freedom is a gift from God — a freedom we must protect at all costs, just as the martyrs and the saints did for us,” said Father Kilcomons.

During the Holy Hour, Father Tangorra spoke about religious liberty in the context of freedom. “Religious liberty is not something merely for Christians, not merely an issue that Catholics deal with it is a religious issue for all religions and indeed for all men,” he said.

“Freedom is not a ‘from’ and it is not an ‘of.’ John the Cross had it right. He defines freedom as a ‘for.’ In St. John the Cross’ understanding of freedom, he realizes that freedom is something already intrinsically had by all of us,” he said.

“We must use our freedom wisely and we must protect our freedom. We need to remind all our brothers and sisters in the one human family that no one grants you freedom. You are already free so use it for the greatest good,” said Father Tangorra.

At the close of Mass, Peter Kueken Jr. Of Regina Mundi Council and church activities director for N.J. State Council, thanked many of his brother knights for attending the Mass. “The Knights are patriots, we are Catholic and we want to pray for religious freedom and religious rights. They are slowly being taking away from us. But many blessings came to us tonight and I’m sure all our intentions have been lifted up.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Clifton+Knights+Host+Holy+Hour%2C+Mass+For+Religious+Liberty/2527855/318424/article.html.

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