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The Beacon The Beacon June 9 2016 : Page 1

SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. 2 BI S HOP A NNOUN C E S C LERGY ASS IGNMENT S MORRIS JUNE 9, 2016 A NNUAL E UCHARISTIC C ATECHESIS 13 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Bishop meets with 144 First Communicants representing parishes across the Diocese By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER 5 C LIENT S ’ A RT NOW ON THE W A LL S OF S TR A IGHT & N A RROW BI S HOP M A KE S P AS TOR A L VI S IT TO W A YNE P A RI S H; M A RK S TENTH S UND A Y IN ORDIN A RY TIME 7-8 13 15-20 20 6 A GIFT FROM THE BISHOP A First Communicant offers her thanks as she accepts a gift from Bishop BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS Y OUTH Serratelli, a memento from his annual diocesan celebration with First Communicants from parishes across the Diocese on June 5 in St. Peter the Apostle Church in Parsippany. This year, 144 First Communicants took part in the annual diocesan Eucharistic Catechesis. PARSIPPANY First Communicants from around the diocese met with Bishop Serratelli to cele-brate the importance of their receiving Jesus for the first time in the Eucharist. Considered one of the Bishop’s favorite diocesan events, the an-nual Celebration for First Communicants with Eucharistic Catechesis was held in St. Peter the Apostle Church here June 5. The celebration in St. Peter’s Church, which was filled with family members of the 144 First Communicants who were wearing their Holy Communion outfits, consisted of catechesis by the Bishop, questions asked by the children and answered by the Bishop, a procession with the Eucharist, adoration and benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. It ended with the Bishop presented each one of the children with a gift. The event was organized by the diocesan Office of Catechesis at St. Paul’s Inside the Walls in CONTINUED on 10 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Bishop Serratelli breaks ground for new St. Pope John XXIII Middle School in Sparta By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR ‘A B OLD A CT OF C OURAGE AND F AITH ’ Bishop Serratelli blessed and dedicated the project: a 22,000-square-foot middle school that will become part of the Catholic Academy of Sussex County and a first-of-its-kind university-style campus model at St. Pope John XXIII Regional High School and Rev. George A. Brown Mem orial School here. Also, the dioce-san plan — which maps out a way to best pro-vide continued and exemplary Catholic educa-tion to its students in a fiscally responsible manner — consolidates three Sussex County Catholic elementary schools —Immaculate Conception Regional School, Franklin; St. Joseph Regional School, Newton; and St. Michael School, Netcong — into the campus for the upcoming academic year. “Today, religion has been driven from the public forum and, tragically, it has lost some in-fluence in private life. Even among faithful Catholics, Catholic truths, values and obser-vances seem to be diminished in our secular culture,” Bishop Serratelli told the audience, be-fore he turned over a ceremonial gold shovel filled with soil. “In this context, our investment as a Diocese, as a school community and as the people of Sussex County in finding a new way to continue Catholic education is a great sign of hope. Today’s groundbreaking for this new middle school is a bold act of courage and faith against the tide of our modern secular so-ciety,” he said. The existing Rev. Brown School will educate pre-k through fourth-graders, while the new middle school will serve fifth-through seventh-graders. The existing high school, which has been thriving, will continue to educate students SIGN OF HOPE on 4 SPARTA On a sunny June 6 morning, Bishop Serratelli broke ground for what he called a “sign of hope” and a “bold act of courage and faith” for Catholic education in Sussex County — a new $4.5 million, two-story St. Pope John XXIII Middle School here that will open its doors in November to students in grades, 5, 6 and 7. The building of the new middle school is part of the Diocese’s comprehensive strategic repositioning plan for the long-term viability and vitality of Catholic education in Passaic, Morris and Sussex counties. In front of a large, enthusiastic crowd,

Annual Eucharistic Catechesis

Cecile San Agustin

Bishop meets with 144 First Communicants representing parishes across the Diocese

PARSIPPANY First Communicants from around the diocese met with Bishop Serratelli to celebrate the importance of their receiving Jesus for the first time in the Eucharist. Considered one of the Bishop’s favorite diocesan events, the annual Celebration for First Communicants with Eucharistic Catechesis was held in St. Peter the Apostle Church here June 5.

The celebration in St. Peter’s Church, which was filled with family members of the 144 First Communicants who were wearing their Holy Communion outfits, consisted of catechesis by the Bishop, questions asked by the children and answered by the Bishop, a procession with the Eucharist, adoration and benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. It ended with the Bishop presented each one of the children with a gift. The event was organized by the diocesan Office of Catechesis at St. Paul’s Inside the Walls in Madison, led by SOLT Father Derek Anderson, who is also pastor of St. Mary Parish in Dover.

In his welcoming message to the children, Bishop Serratelli said, “We are gathered here today because you made your First Communion in your parishes, and now, you come as representatives for all those young people in the Diocese, who received Jesus for the first time in the Eucharist. You come to be with the Bishop so that the whole Church of Paterson can celebrate what is a very, very special day not only in your life but in the life of the Church as well.”

During the catechesis, he spoke about the Eucharist and the Last Supper. The Bishop said, “Jesus loves us so much. He is our best friend and a best friend for the rest of our lives. He gave us the great gift of the Eucharist so he could be with us always.”

Following the Bishop’s talk, he invited the children to ask him questions about faith, about Jesus and about him. First Communicants raised their hands quickly to have the Bishop call on them for their questions.

One of the questions came from Brianna Bellome from Our Lady of the Holy Angels Parish in Little Falls, who asked the Bishop, “What does it feel like to represent Jesus as a priest?”

The Bishop responded, “Humbling. God chooses every single one of us to represent him to the world once we are baptized. Everyone is called to be a mirror image of God. Then from among us, God calls certain people to certain jobs, to certain vocations. When he calls a man to be a priest, that man represents Jesus. When people come to you for counsel, for prayers, it’s very humbling.”

From St. Luke Parish in Long Valley, Owen McCoy asked the Bishop, “What do you remember from your First Communion?”

“I remember how happy I was,” said the Bishop. “In fact, I’ll tell you a little secret. In the dining room of the house where I live, I have a picture from my First Communion with my mother and father next to me and I never forgot how happy I was that day to receive Jesus.”

Sophia Varua from St. Lawrence in Chester asked the Bishop, “What is it like to be a priest?

The Bishop responded, “It is the best life ever” and invited all the boys to think about a possible vocation to the priesthood.

Following the catechesis session, Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament was held. The First Communicants took part in the procession around the aisles of the church. Bishop Serratelli followed them carrying the Blessed Sacrament under a canopy. Benediction followed with the recitation of the Divine Praises.

At the end of the celebration, the Bishop called the First Communicants forward and gave each one of them a gift to remember the day. The children and their families were then invited to take a picture with the Bishop and meet with him during the reception that followed in cafeteria of All Saints Academy, located on the St. Peter the Apostle Parish campus.

As homework for the First Communicants, the Bishop told the young people the story of St. Dominic Savio, who received his First Holy Communion at the age of seven. “On his First Communion Day, Dominic Savio made four promises to God. He promised to go to church every Sunday and holy day. He promised to receive Communion every chance he could. He promised to avoid sin and he promised that his best friends would be Jesus and Mary. I want all of you to do the same. When you get home tonight, I want you to write down promises to God as a result of receiving Jesus for the first time. Refer to this list often. To become a saint, it is not a matter of age. It’s about being good in your daily lives,” the Bishop said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Annual+Eucharistic+Catechesis/2505305/309498/article.html.

‘A Bold Act Of Courage And Faith’

Michael Wojcik

Bishop Serratelli breaks ground for new St. Pope John XXIII Middle School in Sparta

SPARTA On a sunny June 6 morning, Bishop Serratelli broke ground for what he called a “sign of hope” and a “bold act of courage and faith” for Catholic education in Sussex County — a new $4.5 million, two-story St. Pope John XXIII Middle School here that will open its doors in November to students in grades, 5, 6 and 7. The building of the new middle school is part of the Diocese’s comprehensive strategic repositioning plan for the long-term viability and vitality of Catholic education in Passaic, Morris and Sussex counties.

In front of a large, enthusiastic crowd, Bishop Serratelli blessed and dedicated the project: a 22,000-square-foot middle school that will become part of the Catholic Academy of Sussex County and a first-of-its-kind universitystyle campus model at St. Pope John XXIII Regional High School and Rev. George A. Brown Mem orial School here. Also, the diocesan plan — which maps out a way to best provide continued and exemplary Catholic education to its students in a fiscally responsible manner — consolidates three Sussex County Catholic elementary schools —Immaculate Conception Regional School, Franklin; St. Joseph Regional School, Newton; and St. Michael School, Netcong — into the campus for the upcoming academic year.

“Today, religion has been driven from the public forum and, tragically, it has lost some influence in private life. Even among faithful Catholics, Catholic truths, values and observances seem to be diminished in our secular culture,” Bishop Serratelli told the audience, before he turned over a ceremonial gold shovel filled with soil. “In this context, our investment as a Diocese, as a school community and as the people of Sussex County in finding a new way to continue Catholic education is a great sign of hope. Today’s groundbreaking for this new middle school is a bold act of courage and faith against the tide of our modern secular society,” he said.

The existing Rev. Brown School will educate pre-k through fourth-graders, while the new middle school will serve fifth- through seventhgraders. The existing high school, which has been thriving, will continue to educate students in grades 8-12. The facilities will provide enough space for all students from their sending districts and more. The middle school has been made possible through financial support from both the Diocese and the Pope John XXIII Endowment Fund — both of which have made $1 million commitments to this project.

The middle school will be will house an administrative suite and a large gathering space near the entrance, 12 regular classrooms and four specialty classrooms for music, art, science and robotics. Technologically, these three schools will be linked by “dark fiber” and the latest infrastructure “to keep up with education in the 21st century learning environment,” said Craig Austin, the Academy’s vice president of institutional advancement.

As a cost-saving measure, the middle school will be built in sections off site with modular commercial construction — a faster method that also will help contractors meet the project’s tight completion date. All of the 292 middle-school students who have enrolled will start classes along with the other two schools on Sept. 1, and will be housed in the high school, which has some flexibility with its space, Austin said.

Attending the ground-breaking were Diocesan officials and members of the Sussex County faith and school communities, including priests and principals teachers and students from the high school, Rev. Brown and the three sending schools — many of whom participated in the ceremony. Among the speakers was Msgr. Keiran McHugh, the Academy’s director and high school’s president, who said the project is “a milestone for Catholic education in Sussex County and its growth for decades to come.”

Msgr. McHugh thanked a long list of supporters, including Bishop Serratelli; Father Stanley Barron, diocesan vicar for education and pastor of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish, Flanders; Mary Baier, diocesan superintendent of schools; Austin; the Presbyteral Council; the Pope John Educational Foundation; the Academy’s board; and local clergy and Catholic schools.

“We are taking an important leap of faith to ensure Catholic education in Sussex County,” said Msgr. McHugh, who happily reported that the new middle school already has a waiting list for its sixth and seventh grades and that the high school expects the largest incoming freshmen class in years — 220 students. “We have more work to do and many more miles to travel. Our focus must be providing top-notch quality Catholic education for the people of Sussex County. We ask God’s blessings on our work ahead. Let us not be afraid but have the courage to stay the course,” the priest said.

Afterward, Joseph Mazich, a Rev. Brown sixth-grader, spoke in front of the audience with gratitude about the importance of Catholic education to him and his family.

“There is nothing better than attending a school,where I can practice and further strengthen my faith. All my teachers show that they believe in Jesus by acting like his disciples. They instruct us in our coursework to prepare us for the future. They teach us to be kind-hearted and give back to the community. They guide us to make the right decisions like Jesus would,” said Mazich, who noted that the Rev. Brown community deepens its faith in many ways, including daily prayer and Mass. “At Rev. Brown, I am able to express myself and become a better person through Christ. We are always using the gifts that Jesus has granted us. My teachers remind us what Jesus would do in certain situations. My classmates and I have daily religion classes, so I am able constantly to examine Jesus’ actions and miraculous life,” he said.

In his address, Mazich also noted that the Rev. Brown teachers “push us to do better, because they know it will only benefit us in life.”

That morning, Mark Young, president of the Academy’s board, which has been helping with the construction and implementation of the plan, called the June 6 groundbreaking “a great day.” “It [the middle-school project] is a win for Catholic education.

It’s a day that we can be proud to be a Catholic and be a member of this Catholic school community,” Young said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/%E2%80%98A+Bold+Act+Of+Courage+And+Faith%E2%80%99/2505312/309498/article.html.

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