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The Beacon Beacon May 5, 2016 : Page 1

5 BI S HOP TO ORD A IN 11 MEN AS TR A N S ITION A L DE AC ON S SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS MAY 5, 2016 B LUE M ASS The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER Diocese remembers officers lost in the line of duty at 17th annual Mass 12 7 ‘F A LLEN W A RRIOR MEMORI A L’ I S E A GLE SC OUT PROJE C T 16 ACS TO HOLD A NNU A L C OMMEN C EMENT M A Y 14 6-7 9 10-11 12 13-16 Y OUTH O BITUARIES V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Martyr Parish in Madison, delivered the homily at the Blue Mass. He told the offi-PATERSON In honor of the sacri-cers, “Just as people could fices made by law enforcement offi-see the Father in Jesus, cers serving in the three counties of people need to see Jesus in the Diocese and communities be-us. That’s our call as yond, the 17th annual diocesan Blue Church and that’s our call Mass was held May 3 at St. Gerard as disciples. We need be Majella Church here. Jesus Christ out in the Bishop Serratelli was the princi-world. That is our chal-pal celebrant of the Mass, which lenge — to serve as he was concelebrated by several served particularly in the priests of the diocese, many of good work that you do in whom serve as police and fire law enforcement. In order chaplains. Several law enforce-to be this reflection of ment agencies and departments Christ in the world, we were in attendance as well as civil-have to be grounded in the ians and family members of the Gospel.” officers. He also told the officers The Mass remembered fallen of-to ask Jesus for enlighten-BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI ficers killed in the line of duty – ment, for strength and for FOR JUSTICE AND PEACE Surrounded by an honor guard of police officers, Bishop freedom to do the work N.J. State Trooper Eli McCarson, Serratelli processes down the main aisle of St. Gerard Majella Church in Paterson at the that they do. Ask Jesus to N.J. State Trooper Anthony Raspa, start of the Diocese’s 17th annual Blue Mass May 3. N. J. State Trooper Sean Cullen know what the right thing and Corporal Scott R. Thompson of to do is in every and any In welcoming the officers to the Blue Mass, Manchester Township Police Department. There situation especially in times of difficulty or Bishop Serratelli said, “We come together in was also a special remembrance made for the stress that so many of you face in your public thanksgiving to Christ. In a special way, we 15th anniversary of the New York/New Jersey service,” Msgr. Hundt said. Port Authority Police Officers who lost their lives thank those in law enforcement and public “Certainly being your best is to integrate safety asking God’s blessing on them and their on Sept. 11, 2001 in terrorists’ attacks. your faith in everything that you do. families and on their work.” Under rainy, gray skies, American flags were Understand the relationship between justice The songs and readings of the Mass reflect-carried into the church in the opening proces-and mercy. Our Holy Father, Pope Francis, ed themes of peace and justice and prayers sion by an honor guard of officers from differ-speaks of this challenge of mercy. He said, were said for the safety of the officers and the ent police departments. The Emerald Society ‘Jesus went beyond seeing justice as the mere world. The Mass also observed the Feast of Ss. Pipes and Drums followed with the sounds of observance to the law,’ ” said Msgr. Hundt. Philip and James on May 3. muffled drums beating and bagpipers wailing At the Communion meditation, the Emerald Msgr. George Hundt, pastor of St. Vincent in special remembrance of the hero officers lost. BLUE MASS on 8 Bishop breaks ground for renovation of Madison church By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR MADISON Bishop Serratelli helped St. Vincent Martyr Parish here break ground May 1 on a $5.340 million renovation of the interior of its 111-year-old stone Gothic Revival church, designed to improve the worship experi-ence of its parishioners and great-ly improve handicapped accessibil-ity to the building. Wearing a white hard hat, a smiling Bishop Serratelli dedicated the ambitious project with prayers and the lifting of a ceremonial sil-ver shovel filled with soil while presiding over the groundbreaking event on a rainy afternoon. Funding for the ambitious project — which St. Vincent’s anticipates will be completed by April 1 next year — will be provided by gener-ous parishioners through the parish’s “Building Our Future” capital campaign, according to Jan Figenshu, the parish’s pastoral associate. “The new configuration [of the church’s interior] with this reno-vation will lead to enhanced wor-ship of the community as a whole,” said Msgr. George Hundt, St. Vincent’s pastor, who partici-pated in the groundbreaking cere-mony with Bishop Emeritus Rodimer and countless members of the parish community, includ-ing clergy, staff and laity — among them members of the committee that oversaw develop-ment of the project and young people. “I’m feeling grateful to everyone for his or her time, tal-ent and treasure in working for our parish’s future. It’s been a col-laborative effort. Now we put this project in God’s hands,” Msgr. Hundt said. The renovation — the sixth in the church’s history — requires the gutting of the church interior and calls for the repositioning of the altar from its current location “in the round” at the center to the rear wall of the church. This design requires the removal some seating at the back and the doors BREAKS GROUND on 2

Blue Mass

Cecile San Agustin

Diocese remembers officers lost in the line of duty at 17th annual Mass

PATERSON In honor of the sacrifices made by law enforcement officers serving in the three counties of the Diocese and communities beyond, the 17th annual diocesan Blue Mass was held May 3 at St. Gerard Majella Church here.

Bishop Serratelli was the principal celebrant of the Mass, which was concelebrated by several priests of the diocese, many of whom serve as police and fire chaplains. Several law enforcement agencies and departments were in attendance as well as civilians and family members of the officers.

The Mass remembered fallen officers killed in the line of duty – N. J. State Trooper Eli McCarson, N. J. State Trooper Anthony Raspa, N. J. State Trooper Sean Cullen and Corporal Scott R. Thompson of Manchester Township Police Department. There was also a special remembrance made for the 15th anniversary of the New York/New Jersey Port Authority Police Officers who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001 in terrorists’ attacks.

Under rainy, gray skies, American flags were carried into the church in the opening procession by an honor guard of officers from different police departments. The Emerald Society Pipes and Drums followed with the sounds of muffled drums beating and bagpipers wailing in special remembrance of the hero officers lost.

In welcoming the officers to the Blue Mass, Bishop Serratelli said, “We come together in thanksgiving to Christ. In a special way, we thank those in law enforcement and public safety asking God’s blessing on them and their families and on their work.”

The songs and readings of the Mass reflected themes of peace and justice and prayers were said for the safety of the officers and the world. The Mass also observed the Feast of Ss. Philip and James on May 3.

Msgr. George Hundt, pastor of St. Vincent Martyr Parish in Madison, delivered the homily at the Blue Mass. He told the officers, “Just as people could see the Father in Jesus, people need to see Jesus in us. That’s our call as Church and that’s our call as disciples. We need be Jesus Christ out in the world. That is our challenge — to serve as he served particularly in the good work that you do in law enforcement. In order to be this reflection of Christ in the world, we have to be grounded in the Gospel.”

He also told the officers to ask Jesus for enlightenment, for strength and for freedom to do the work that they do. Ask Jesus to know what the right thing to do is in every and any situation especially in times of difficulty or stress that so many of you face in your public service,” Msgr. Hundt said.

“Certainly being your best is to integrate your faith in everything that you do. Understand the relationship between justice and mercy. Our Holy Father, Pope Francis, speaks of this challenge of mercy. He said, ‘Jesus went beyond seeing justice as the mere observance to the law,’ ” said Msgr. Hundt.

At the Communion meditation, the Emerald Society Pipes and Drums played “Amazing Grace,” which has become tradition for the Blue Mass. Bishop Serratelli then blessed the commemorative Blue Mass pins and the medals of the officers at the end of Mass to wear them to keep them safe from harm and protect them.

Following the Mass, Msgr. Mark Giordani, rector of the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist and a police chaplain, expressed his heartfelt thanks to the Blue Mass committee and everyone for attending. He was also grateful for the continued success of the Blue Mass. A reception followed at the Brownstone here where many of the officers from the different agencies came together in fellowship after the Mass.

At the end of Mass, the Bishop said to the law enforcement officers, “I am so happy to see you here to celebrate with us. The Psalm today said, ‘Their message go forth through all the Earth.’ In the work that you do, you ensure the message of justice and peace goes out to the world.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Blue+Mass/2474581/300947/article.html.

Bishop Breaks Ground For Renovation Of Madison Church

Michael Wojcik

MADISON Bishop Serratelli helped St. Vincent Martyr Parish here break ground May 1 on a $5.340 million renovation of the interior of its 111-year-old stone Gothic Revival church, designed to improve the worship experience of its parishioners and greatly improve handicapped accessibility to the building.

Wearing a white hard hat, a smiling Bishop Serratelli dedicated the ambitious project with prayers and the lifting of a ceremonial silver shovel filled with soil while presiding over the groundbreaking event on a rainy afternoon. Funding for the ambitious project — which St. Vincent’s anticipates will be completed by April 1 next year — will be provided by generous parishioners through the parish’s “Building Our Future” capital campaign, according to Jan Figenshu, the parish’s pastoral associate.

“The new configuration [of the church’s interior] with this renovation will lead to enhanced worship of the community as a whole,” said Msgr. George Hundt, St. Vincent’s pastor, who participated in the groundbreaking ceremony with Bishop Emeritus Rodimer and countless members of the parish community, including clergy, staff and laity — among them members of the committee that oversaw development of the project and young people. “I’m feeling grateful to everyone for his or her time, talent and treasure in working for our parish’s future. It’s been a collaborative effort. Now we put this project in God’s hands,” Msgr. Hundt said.

The renovation — the sixth in the church’s history — requires the gutting of the church interior and calls for the repositioning of the altar from its current location “in the round” at the center to the rear wall of the church. This design requires the removal some seating at the back and the doors that lead to the rear parking lot. Also, a reredos, or high altar, that was removed from a Vincentian church in Brooklyn will be installed. Also to be replaced will be the altar table, baptismal font, the ambo and the tabernacle, which will be re-positioned behind the altar, Figenshu said.

The project also calls for pews to replace some of the chairs in the 475-seat worship space to be placed at an angle, “so that people can see each other” and to promote a “greater sense of gathering.” The church will not lose seating. Workers will build a new entrance onto the front of the church that will include a vesting room for clergy, Figenshu said.

To make the church more handicapped accessible, the worship space will feature an elevator and a lift inside and grading outside on the property. Its interior also will include four handicapped-accessible restrooms. The building will feature other upgrades, such as a new air-conditioning system, Figenshu said.

Last weekend, St. Vincent’s held a Ritual to Reverence the Altar to bid farewell in a prayerful way to the altar that had served as the center of the faith community for 40 years. After the homily at Masses, parishioners were invited to reverence the altar by approaching it as individuals or in groups and place their hands in prayer upon the altar, which will be reverently and carefully dismantled and placed in safe keeping with the intent of finding a sacred purpose for it in the future, Figenshu said.

The ambitious renovations to St. Vincent’s join work that has been ongoing for a $2 million, two-story addition to parish school, which broke ground at a ceremony presided at by Bishop Serratelli this past January. The school project, scheduled for completion by August, will provide six more classrooms for a student population that has grown fourfold in recent years since the re-establishment of its middle-school grades, Msgr. Hundt said.

St. Vincent’s developed these two renovation projects — and many other initiatives — as products of its ongoing “Envision: Planning Our Parish Future,” a comprehensive, results-driven planning process that already has inspired the parish to expand further its reach in spreading the “Good News” of the Gospel.” Planning for the church project included extensive discussions with every sector of the parish community, Msgr. Hundt said.

While the church undergoes renovations, St. Vincent’s has mapped out the following schedule of worship:

• Weekend and holy day worship and Baptisms in the school gym;

• Daily Mass at 8:30 a.m. and noon (no noon Mass on Saturdays) at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization, also in Madison;

• Funerals and weddings at St. Thomas More Church, Convent Station, and neighboring churches;

• Special events at Holy Family Chapel at the College of St. Elizabeth, Convent Station; and

• Reservation of the Blessed Sacrament in St. Vincent’s rectory.

St. Vincent’s has asked that parishioners volunteer to organize into teams to spearhead the transformation of the auditorium into the weekend worship space.

The renovation project makes improvements to the current church, which was built in 1905 as the third church of the parish, which this year marks 177 years since its founding. Its original design was taken from Church of Oxford, England, a 13th century structure. Jeremiah O’Rourke, who designed the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart, Newark, and is considered the father of American church architecture, designed St. Vincent’s current church, according to the parish history.

“The renovations of the church combine a connected sense of community with a transcendental experience. It will allow for more movement [of Mass participants] on the altar. Also, Catholic symbols will be more visible to people throughout the church,” Figenshu said. “St. Vincent’s has always reacted to the liturgical needs of the parish. With the renovation, it continues to address those needs,” she said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Bishop+Breaks+Ground+For+Renovation+Of+Madison+Church/2474596/300947/article.html.

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