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The Beacon The Beacon April 21 2016 : Page 1

SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. 2 S EVEN H A BIT S OF C HRI S TI A N DI SC IPLE S MORRIS APRIL 21, 2016 C ONSECRATION OF N EW A LTAR 12 5 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard T HE ‘J EWEL OF THE D IOCESE ’ Archivist reviews venerable history of St. John’s Cathedral By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR DI SA BLED PRO LIFE A DVO CA TE T A LK S A BOUT TRU S TING GOD’ S WILL S T A TUE OF OUR L A DY OF MOUNT CA RMEL RE S TORED A T S TR A IGHT A ND N A RROW 6-7 12 13-14 15 16-20 8 Y OUTH W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Bishop Serratelli celebrates Mass in St. Joseph Chapel at Mary Help of Christians Academy in North Haledon April 17. Prior to the Mass, Bishop Serratelli rededicated the chapel and consecrated the chapel’s new altar. Attending were many Salesian Sisters, students and friends of Mary Help of Christians, which is marking its 75th anniversary this year. For story and more photos, see page 4. DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Diocese marks 75 years serving the deaf as Deafest inspires participants By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER CLIFTON The message was clear, even in American Sign Language (ASL) that “God loves everyone, no matter what challenges they have in life.” More than 100 deaf persons were in-spired by that message at the 2016 Catholic Deafest held at the St. Pope John Paul II Center here April 16. The day-long conference, themed “God’s Most Wanted: Who?,” was sponsored by the N.J. Pastoral Workers with the Deaf, which is made up of deaf ministers from the five dioce-ses of the state. Each year, a different diocese hosts the event and this year, was the Paterson Diocese’s turn to host it. Louise “Lulu” Lee, a deaf mentor in Wisconsin who leads deaf Catholic retreats around the country, presented the keynote address. The participants ranged from all ages and backgrounds with two common bonds — they were deaf and they were proud Catholics. All presentations were in ASL and voice-interpreted for those participants who were accompanied by family and friends. A stenographer operating a CART (Communica tions Access Realtime Translation) machine enabled the typed tran-script’s projection onto a screen. There were al-so tables featuring a history of deaf ministries within the dioceses and vendors were available with information and services for the deaf. Crafts made by the deaf were also available. DEAFEST on 11 MADISON Extensive renovations continue at the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist — the Mother Church of the Diocese of Paterson that has remained integral to the spiritual life of the city since it opened in 1870 and the Diocese since it was formed in 1937. This Gothic Revival structure — which holds the seat of the dioce-san bishop — also has the distinction of hous-ing an active parish community, com-A virtual tour of posed mostly of the interior res -Hispanics. Msgr. Raymond toration of the Kupke, diocesan Cathedral of St. archivist and pastor John the Baptist is of St. Anthony now available on Parish, Hawthorne, made those observa-the home page of tions during his talk the Diocese of on the history of St. Paterson’s website, John’s, the tallest www.rcdop.org. house of worship in the Silk City, on Once there, click April 13 at St. Paul on the link for the Inside the Walls: the virtual tour. Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. The cathedral was closed in 2013, because of safety concerns and has been undergoing massive renovations to its interior and exterior to ensure its structural integrity and restore much of its breathtaking architec-ture to its former glory. “The cathedral is venerable, because it’s the Mother Church of the diocese, the largest church in the diocese, the tallest building in the city and the most visible church in Paterson in a symbolic and real way,” said Msgr. Kupke in his talk, titled “Jewel of the Diocese,” during which he shared with the audience historic doc-JEWEL OF THE DIOCESE on 10

Diocese Marks 75 Years Serving The Deaf As Deafest Inspires Participants

Cecile San Agustin

CLIFTON The message was clear, even in American Sign Language (ASL) that “God loves everyone, no matter what challenges they have in life.” More than 100 deaf persons were inspired by that message at the 2016 Catholic Deafest held at the St. Pope John Paul II Center here April 16.

The day-long conference, themed “God’s Most Wanted: Who?,” was sponsored by the N. J. Pastoral Workers with the Deaf, which is made up of deaf ministers from the five dioceses of the state. Each year, a different diocese hosts the event and this year, was the Paterson Diocese’s turn to host it. Louise “Lulu” Lee, a deaf mentor in Wisconsin who leads deaf Catholic retreats around the country, presented the keynote address.

The participants ranged from all ages and backgrounds with two common bonds — they were deaf and they were proud Catholics. All presentations were in ASL and voice-interpreted for those participants who were accompanied by family and friends. A stenographer operating a CART (Communications Access Realtime Translation) machine enabled the typed transcript’s projection onto a screen. There were also tables featuring a history of deaf ministries within the dioceses and vendors were available with information and services for the deaf. Crafts made by the deaf were also available.

The conference began with prayer featuring the song, “Christ Be Our Light.” As the song played, a group of deaf participants waved small candles in the air and then read quietly on a widescreen the lyrics of the song. After the prayer and to welcome the keynote speaker, the audience greeted her with the ASL version of applause — hands upraised and fluttered side to side.

In her talk, Lee, who is a married mother, inspired the participants to use their gifts and talents to make the world a better place. In ASL, she told them, “By the title [of the conference] ‘God’s most wanted is who?’ It’s His children. That’s all of you. We are brothers and sisters in Christ.”

During her presentation, she also talked about the Year of Mercy and said for this conference, “Every time I talk about mercy I’m going to sign the word love instead of the sign of mercy because that is what mercy essentially is, it is love.”

She also spoke about the changes within the Church and ministering to the deaf. Decades ago there weren’t Masses in sign language but now, priests around the world learn how to sign. She thanked those at the conference who minister to the deaf allowing the community to feel included in the Church.

Reminding the participants, Lee signed, “Once you recognize that you have special gifts and skills, we can go out and be a light to the world.”

Msgr. Joseph Goode, moderator for the Diocesan Catholic Deaf Society and pastor of both St. Mark the Evangelist and Our Lady of the Mountain parishes in Long Valley, was part of the team that organized the event. He learned ASL during his seminary training. “I took sign language as a class and had to meet with a deaf group as a requirement of the class,” he said. “That’s how I got into the ministry. With the conference, the whole idea of this day is to promote spirituality among the deaf community and develop deaf leadership [in the Church].”

In the Paterson Diocese, three churches offer Mass with ASL interpretation: Assumption Church in Morristown at 10 a. m. on Sundays; St. Mary Church in Pompton Lakes at 10:30 a.m. on Sundays; and St. Peter the Apostle Church in Parsippany at 10:30 a.m. on the first and third Sunday of the month. St. Peter’s also hosts a deaf adult spirituality group that meets once a month on the last Friday of the month. The ministry also provides a religious education class for deaf children every Wednesday afternoon from 3 to 4:10 p.m. On every third Sunday at 2:30 p.m., Msgr. Goode celebrates Mass in ASL for the deaf in St. Brendan/St. George Church in Clifton.

The Diocesan Catholic Deaf Society has been a presence in the diocese for 75 years. The deaf community of the Paterson Diocese actually started gathering in 1939, three years before it made their spiritual needs known to Bishop Thomas McLaughlin, who established the Catholic Deaf Society on St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, 1941. Msgr. Denis Hayes served as its first moderator, followed by Father Andrew Molnar, Msgr. Joseph Gallo and Msgr. Thomas Trapasso. Msgr. Goode’s 40 years as moderator is the longest in the 75-year history of the society

At the conference, Gloria Noll, who was part of the committee for the Deafest, used ASL to describe her thoughts with Msgr. Goode interpreting. She signed, “Today was beautiful and it’s very empowering for the deaf. I feel close to God especially through prayer.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Diocese+Marks+75+Years+Serving+The+Deaf+As+Deafest+Inspires+Participants/2460826/298881/article.html.

The ‘Jewel Of The Diocese’

Michael Wojcik

Archivist reviews venerable history of St. John’s Cathedral

MADISON Extensive renovations continue at the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist — the Mother Church of the Diocese of Paterson that has remained integral to the spiritual life of the city since it opened in 1870 and the Diocese since it was formed in 1937. This Gothic Revival structure — which holds the seat of the diocesan bishop — also has the distinction of housing an active parish community, composed mostly of Hispanics.

Msgr. Raymond Kupke, diocesan archivist and pastor of St. Anthony Parish, Hawthorne, made those observations during his talk on the history of St. John’s, the tallest house of worship in the Silk City, on April 13 at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. The cathedral was closed in 2013, because of safety concerns and has been undergoing massive renovations to its interior and exterior to ensure its structural integrity and restore much of its breathtaking architecture to its former glory.

“The cathedral is venerable, because it’s the Mother Church of the diocese, the largest church in the diocese, the tallest building in the city and the most visible church in Paterson in a symbolic and real way,” said Msgr. Kupke in his talk, titled “Jewel of the Diocese,” during which he shared with the audience historic documents and photographs. “The cathedral isn’t a relic. It had 640 baptisms last year. It’s still as active a congregation as when Dean McNulty [the visionary priest, who oversaw the construction] first stepped into Paterson. It’s worth all the attention that we are paying now to fix it up,” he said.

Funded by the generosity of the faithful across the Diocese through the Partners in Faith campaign, the renovations — which mostly have addressed structural issues — have entered the third and final phase, which began last summer. St. John’s has been shrouded in scaffolding, since the beginning of the project.

The first phase included repairs to the heavy timber trusses that support both the ceiling and the roof in the attic, the footings, foundation and floor joists in the crawl space and the entire brown stone façade of the cathedral’s exterior. The second phase included tower repointing, additional stone repairs and capping it and grouting at top decks of the bell tower. The third phase involves restoration of the stained-glass windows, choir loft, seating, organ, the Stations of the Cross and other statues and the chandlers.

Throughout the years, the major events of the Diocese, including priestly ordinations, have taken place in St. John’s. Its history began in 1820 with the arrival of its first resident priest, Father Richard Bulger. The first church was built on the corner of Mill and Market streets in Paterson in 1821. The community of Irish immigrants grew so quickly in 18 years that a new church was built on Oliver Street in 1839. Its 13th pastor, the largerthan- life Irish-born Dean William McNulty, arrived in 1863, said Msgr. Kupke, author of “Living Stones: a History of the Catholic Church in the Diocese of Paterson.”

“Deacon McNulty was an entrepreneur,” said Msgr. Kupke, who noted that the dynamic priest enjoyed taking on an array of construction projects, including many churches, schools, residences for religious sisters and even St. Joseph’s Hospital. “He was pastor for a remarkable 59 years and was active into his 90s.”

Deacon McNulty thought that the Oliver Street church was too small and was not visible enough, because it was located on a side street. So he bought property at the corner of Grand and Main streets for $10,000. Many parishioners, who worked as laborers during the day, volunteered their services after their regular work hours to construct the new church, which was built of New Jersey brownstone. The new church was dedicated in 1870, but still needed some finishing touches, such as stained-glass windows and spires. The original church — which the pastor made certain was paid for — included a wooden altar and gas lamps between the pews, Msgr. Kupke said.

“This shows the vision of Deacon McNulty. He wanted St. John’s to accommodate all the Catholics in the city to worship at the same time,” Msgr. Kupke said. The priest denied that he built the new church as a cathedral, even though it could be argued that it features a pulpit on the altar to make room for the bishop’s chair — or “cathedra,” he said.

St. John’s wasn’t named a cathedral until 1937, after Pope Pius XI established the Paterson Diocese that year. The building has been renovated about 14 times during its long history. Since 1987, Msgr. Mark Giordani has led the vibrant faith community as rector, said Msgr. Kupke, also an adjunct professor of Church history at Seton Hall School of Theology, South Orange, who also writes a column on the history of the Diocese, its priests and parishes for The Beacon.

Before the engaging presentation, Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization, introduced Msgr. Kupke and prayed that God “inspires us with this story of the ‘Jewel of the Diocese,’ so we ourselves will become temples of His spirit.”

Afterward, Msgr. Kupke fielded questions from the audience.

In the audience that night at St. Paul’s was Dennis Rodano, diocesan project manager, who has been overseeing the cathedral renovations with Rebeca Ruiz- Ulloa, diocesan architect. He previously had heard Msgr. Kupke give a presentation on the history of St. John’s to benefactors of the renovation project.

“It helps me understand the history of the cathedral. I’m impressed with the parishioners, who worked on St. John’s with their own hands. Their own sweat is in the building. They helped provide for a Mother Church — the beacon of the Diocese,” Rodano said. “Today, it’s because of the sacrifices of St. John’s parishioners and the good people of the Diocese that we can renovate the cathedral.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/The+%E2%80%98Jewel+Of+The+Diocese%E2%80%99/2460838/298881/article.html.

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