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The Beacon Beacon March 17 2016 revise : Page 1

12-13 A NNU A L DIO C E SA N FIN A N C I A L UPD A TE SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS MARCH 17, 2016 S HROUDED I N M YSTERY The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard A NNUAL A CIES 16 7 Shroud of Turin can ‘draw us into the story of Jesus’ Passion’ By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR NET C H A LLENGE S YOUTH TO EMBR AC E C HRI S T A ND HI S C HUR C H 3 SC HOOL S A RE FIR S T IN U. S . TO E A RN S TEM C ERTIFI CA TION 8 6-7 14-15 16 18-24 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS MADISON The Shroud of Turin — a holy relic or a clever hoax? For more than a century, it has remained one of the greatest un-solved mysteries of the world. Scientists, historians and Christians alike have pondered the authentici-ty of the Shroud, which many peo-ple believe to be the burial cloth of Jesus the Messiah. Whose image does it bear exactly? And how did the image of a crucified man get imprinted on the cloth — by a great miracle of God or by the hands of a talented artist? Several Popes, such as St. John Paul II, have believed in the mirac-ulous nature of the Shroud but the Vatican has never staked out an of-ficial position on this great mystery, which has long divided researchers and believers. Rather, the Church has left it up to individual Catholics to believe — or not. But maybe, what one thinks about the Shroud is irrelevant, said Bill Wingard, founder of the Baltimore-based ministry, Shroud Talks. On March 9, he spoke on the hotly de-bated burial cloth at Morris Catholic High School, Denville, and St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. “I believe that the Shroud is the burial cloth of Christ, but you don’t have to,” Wingard told audiences, during his hour-long multimedia presentation that laid out convinc-ing scientific, Scriptural and histori-cal evidence in support of his be-lief. It featured a 14½-foot long, 3½-foot-wide replica of the Shroud. “I think that God gave us the Shroud to draw us into the story of Jesus’ Passion — God’s to-tal and utter humiliation — where he suffered and died for our salva-tion. It’s possibly the greatest relic in the Church,” he said. But more important than the Shroud, “Jesus left us with the SHROUDED IN MYSTERY on 9 BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI During the Annual Acies of the Legion of Mary at St. Margaret Church in Morristown March 13 a father and his daughter place their hands on the Vexilium to renew their act of consecration to the Blessed Mother. For story, more photos, see page 11. Bagpipes take diocesan priest halfway around the world By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR MOUNTAIN LAKES Anticipation mounts as the drummers tap out a crisp roll off. Then, the bagpipers play a low bass drone, before taking a breath to begin the plaintive wail of an old Irish favorite, such as “Minstrel Boy.” The music swells as the pipe band marches past a cheering crowd on a city street in a St. Patrick’s Day Parade — a thrill that Father Jared Brogan, a diocesan priest, had known for 13 years, while playing the bagpipes in two renowned pipe bands in New York City. The sweet sounds of St. Patrick’s Day, which the world celebrates today March 17, still ring in the ears and heart of Father Brogan, now the administrator of St. Catherine of Siena Parish here. The Brooklyn native smiles when remem-bering the excitement of performing pipe band music in most types of events in the Tri-State Area — from parades, concerts, and festivals to weddings, funerals, birthday parties and even bar mitzvahs. He loved playing a wide variety of tunes, such as “Amazing Grace” and “Scotland the Brave,” on his bagpipes that have carried him halfway around the world — to a global music competition in Scotland — and to extraordinary experiences — like serenading a U.S. president on late-night TV. “I’m amazed at all the places that I’ve trav-eled, all the things that I’ve done and all the people I’ve met playing the bagpipes. I could never have imaged that I would have made something of it,” said the 36-year-old priest, who performed with two highly regarded musi-cal outfits, the N.Y. City Department of BAGPIPES on 2 PIPING PRIEST Father Jared Brogan stands next to a large photo of him in uniform playing his bagpipes that was displayed at a reception at a parish he previously had served, St. Philip the Apostle. Clifton.

Shrouded In Mystery

Michael Wojcik

Shroud of Turin can ‘draw us into the story of Jesus’ Passion’

MADISON The Shroud of Turin — a holy relic or a clever hoax?

For more than a century, it has remained one of the greatest unsolved mysteries of the world. Scientists, historians and Christians alike have pondered the authenticity of the Shroud, which many people believe to be the burial cloth of Jesus the Messiah. Whose image does it bear exactly? And how did the image of a crucified man get imprinted on the cloth — by a great miracle of God or by the hands of a talented artist?

Several Popes, such as St. John Paul II, have believed in the miraculous nature of the Shroud but the Vatican has never staked out an official position on this great mystery, which has long divided researchers and believers. Rather, the Church has left it up to individual Catholics to believe — or not. But maybe, what one thinks about the Shroud is irrelevant, said Bill Wingard, founder of the Baltimorebased ministry, Shroud Talks. On March 9, he spoke on the hotly debated burial cloth at Morris Catholic High School, Denville, and St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here.

“I believe that the Shroud is the burial cloth of Christ, but you don’t have to,” Wingard told audiences, during his hour-long multimedia presentation that laid out convincing scientific, Scriptural and historical evidence in support of his belief. It featured a 14½-foot long, 3½-foot- wide replica of the Shroud. “I think that God gave us the Shroud to draw us into the story of Jesus’ Passion — God’s total and utter humiliation — where he suffered and died for our salvation. It’s possibly the greatest relic in the Church,” he said.

But more important than the Shroud, “Jesus left us with the Eucharist — his actual Divine Presence. That’s it,” said Wingard, who spoke in the afternoon at Morris Catholic and in the evening at St. Paul’s, under the title “Shrouded in Mystery.” With help from a team of assistants, he gives presentations on the Shroud in several U.S. states, living out his “commitment to spread its message.”

During his talk, Wingard asked the audiences to consider the scientific, Scriptural and historical evidence, which he considers compelling. He showed slides of maps and photos of the many of the locations across Europe that have housed the Shroud over the centuries; photos of the scientific evidence; and paintings, photos and drawings of the cloth. The mystery began in 1898, when the first photo of the Shroud showed the image to be negative — not positive like an actual photo — leaving people — including scientists — to question how it got there, Wingard said.

Intense scientific interest in Shroud continued to 1978, when a team of the world’s top researchers in many fields traveled to Turin, Italy, to conduct a thorough examination of the cloth. They determined that the dirt on it could only be found in Jerusalem. They confirmed that it bears human bloodstains that have stayed the color red — not turning brown with age — caused when a person suffers severe trauma. Researchers also noted that the cloth displays no other bodily secretions, showing that the body did not decay, Wingard said.

“The team issued a report in 1981, which determined that the Shroud bears the image of a crucified man and that it was not made by an artist or photographer,” said Wingard, who added that researchers did not call the Shroud the burial cloth of Jesus.

Yet the 1978 examination of the Shroud was not without problems. Three Carbon 14 dating tests determined that its fibers originated from the Middle Ages, not around the time of the Crucifixion. But in 2005, a scientist realized that the researchers took the samples from only one edge of the cloth, which had been re-stitched centuries later. Also, the first-century Hungarian Pray Manuscript shows an image of a burial cloth that is believed to be the Shroud — another piece of evidence that suggests that it was not a medieval creation, Wingard said.

Not only that, but the scientific evidence on the Shroud corresponds with Gospel accounts of Jesus’ passion and death. The face on the cloth has swollen cheekbones and a broken nose — which might show that the Jewish high priest Caiaphas had the Savior beaten — and marks down the front and back of the body — which possibly shows where Pontius Pilate had him scourged. The Shroud bears bloodstains around the face and at the back of the head like wounds that the crown of thorns on Jesus’ head could have caused. The man’s shoulders bear marks similar to injuries that Christ might have suffered as he carried the cross bar of the Cross of his Crucifixion through the streets of Jerusalem, Wingard said.

“Does the Shroud show any proof of the Resurrection of Christ?” asked Wingard, who offered up the following evidence, suggesting that Jesus’ rising from the dead might have produced intense light that created the image of the crucified man. “Scientists say that the image is made up of millions of tiny dots that would have taken billions of watts of energy in a 40th billionth of a second to produce.”

After his talk in St. Paul’s auditorium, Wingard answered questions from an inquisitive audience. Allan Wright, St. Paul’s academic dean and the event’s master of ceremonies, praised the presenter and called the talk a “lively presentation about the Shroud and faith as well.” Before heading home, audience members took the opportunity to file past and take photos of the large photographic replica of the Shroud and two large photos of negative images of the cloth.

Excited after having viewed the life-like replica, Bob McDermott of Norte Dame of Mount Carmel Parish, Cedar Knolls, told The Beacon that he believes the Shroud to be the actual burial cloth of Christ.

“I buy it. There are too many things that are unexplained otherwise and too many facts that match up [to support the claim of the Shroud’s authenticity] — like the scourge marks. How did they get there?” McDermott said. “The Shroud can deepen people’s faith by being the visual aid that we might need to see. It was great to see it up close like that. It was special,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Shrouded+In+Mystery/2429818/294711/article.html.

Bagpipes Take Diocesan Priest Halfway Around The World

Michael Wojcik

MOUNTAIN LAKES Anticipation mounts as the drummers tap out a crisp roll off. Then, the bagpipers play a low bass drone, before taking a breath to begin the plaintive wail of an old Irish favorite, such as “Minstrel Boy.” The music swells as the pipe band marches past a cheering crowd on a city street in a St. Patrick’s Day Parade — a thrill that Father Jared Brogan, a diocesan priest, had known for 13 years, while playing the bagpipes in two renowned pipe bands in New York City.

The sweet sounds of St. Patrick’s Day, which the world celebrates today March 17, still ring in the ears and heart of Father Brogan, now the administrator of St. Catherine of Siena Parish here. The Brooklyn native smiles when remembering the excitement of performing pipe band music in most types of events in the Tri-State Area — from parades, concerts, and festivals to weddings, funerals, birthday parties and even bar mitzvahs. He loved playing a wide variety of tunes, such as “Amazing Grace” and “Scotland the Brave,” on his bagpipes that have carried him halfway around the world — to a global music competition in Scotland — and to extraordinary experiences — like serenading a U. S. president on late-night TV.

“I’m amazed at all the places that I’ve traveled, all the things that I’ve done and all the people I’ve met playing the bagpipes. I could never have imaged that I would have made something of it,” said the 36-year-old priest, who performed with two highly regarded musical outfits, the N.Y. City Department of Corrections Pipe Band and the Monaghan Pipe Band, before stepping away from his pipes in 2005 to pursue the priesthood.

From the start, playing the bagpipes seemed to resonate with Father Brogan. No one in his family played but he heard them at many cultural events throughout his Irish Catholic upbringing. At 12 years old, he started taking lessons from Bob Hanley, a member of the Knights of Columbus in his neighborhood of Marine Park, Brooklyn, who offered instruction to local kids, the priest said.

“I took to it, loved it and realized that I was good at it,” said Father Brogan, who joined the N.Y. Department of Corrections Pipe Band in 1993 when he was 14. “Here I was this teen-ager playing bagpipes next to these bruising prison guards, but it was a wonderful experience,” he said with a chuckle.

Father Brogan also experienced the thrill of notching victories in local Grade Four competitions with the N.Y. Department of Corrections Pipe Band, which also played an international competition in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1999. The young man left the group that year to hone his skills playing solo bagpipes.

A year later, Father Brogan joined the Monaghan Pipe Band, one of the oldest pipe bands in the U.S., which traces its origins back to 1929. The group ranked high in international competitions, which took its players to almost every state in the country and up to Ontario and Quebec in Canada. He competed as a soloist and with the band. Judges evaluate players on the quality of their tone and how well they perform as an ensemble, he said.

The Monaghan Pipe Band geared up for its April to October performance season by requiring its musicians to commit to a demanding schedule of rehearsals twice a week — both with the entire band and with their individual instrument sections. If that were not enough, the industrious Father Brogan also practiced at home an hour or two each day.

“I wanted to play the best that I could,” said Father Brogan, who parlayed his considerable musical experience into a parttime job, while pursuing a bachelor’s degree in speech communication from St. Joseph’s College, Brooklyn, by offering individual and band bagpipe instruction.

Playing the bagpipes at such a high level opened doors, both figuratively and literally, to venues usually not available to groups that play that style of music. Once, he had the thrill of playing in front of thousands of people in Madison Square Garden as a “warm-up” act before one of rock star Rod Stewart’s concerts. The Monaghan Pipe Band also appeared on TV — playing on the MTV show “Total Request Live” on a St. Patrick’s Day in Times Square and serenading President George W. Bush on “The David Letterman Show,” Father Brogan said.

Playing in the Monaghan Pipe Band also helped open a bit wider the doors to Father Brogan’s future vocation as a priest, when one of its musicians, Lachlan Cameron, left to enter the seminary. Today, he serves as a priest of the Diocese of Rockville Centre in N. Y. After the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, the drumbeat of God’s call to priesthood grew so loud, that Father Brogan could not longer ignore it, he told The Beacon in 2009.

“When Lachlan announced that he was entering the seminary, I took him aside and told him that I was thinking the same thing: that I had a calling,” said Father Brogan, who then was studying for a master’s degree in speech language pathology at New York University.

Later, Father Brogan worked as a speech language pathologist for N.Y. City Depart - ment of Education. In 2005, Father Brogan stepped away from his bagpipes to enter the Theological College, the National Sem - inary of the Catholic University of America in Washington. Bishop Serratelli ordained as priest of the Paterson Diocese in 2011.

Occasionally, Father Brogan, also a co-director of diocesan vocations, dusts off his pipes to play at the parishes he served. As a seminarian, he played for the feast of the patron of St. Margaret of Scotland Parish, Morristown. As a parochial vicar, he performed at St. Patrick’s Day events at St. Philip the Apostle Parish, Clifton.

“Faith and culture are connected. Music — a part of that culture — brings people together and is a way for people to encounter God. The Lord reveals himself in beautiful things and music is beautiful,” said Father Brogan, who admitted that he temporarily stashed his bagpipes and uniform, which includes a black, blue and grey kilt, at his parent’s house in Brooklyn. “Most people at St. Catherine’s don’t know that I play bagpipes, but I’m sure that, after they see this article, they will be asking me to play.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Bagpipes+Take+Diocesan+Priest+Halfway+Around+The+World/2429823/294711/article.html.

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