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The Beacon The Beacon January 28, 2016 : Page 1

BISHOP ISSUES PASTORAL LETTER TO COLLEGE STUDENTS SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. 3 MORRIS JANUARY 28, 2016 R EPOSITIONING C ATHOLIC S CHOOLS FOR S UCCESS 9 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard 5 DESPITE BLIZZARD, STATE OF EMERGENCY, BISHOP’S DISPENSATION, SOME STILL MAKE IT TO SUNDAY MASS CELEBRATING CATHOLIC SCHOOLS WEEK IN THE PATERSON DIOCESE Building projects, consolidations, mergers address future growth and sustainability provide the best, most sustainable Catholic school education to fami-lies in the Diocese of Paterson, several schools will embark on a comprehensive, strategic reposition-ing plan for the long-term viability and vitality of Catholic education in Passaic, Morris and Sussex counties. “Catholic education is a priority for the Diocese of Paterson. It is a privileged way to accomplish the Church’s primary mission of evan-gelization,” said Bishop Serratelli. “In our diverse society, the Catholic school is an institutional commitment on our part to con-tribute to the good of all society by educating students with academic excellence and forming them to bring the power of faith to improve society with the knowledge that they gain. Catholic schools remain one of the best ways to nourish CLIFTON To ensure the ability to faith in Jesus, a love of the Church and a commitment to serve others, especially the poor. Working to-gether with parents, who have the first responsibility for their children, the Catholic school helps prepare students to take their place in soci-ety as well-educated, responsible, moral individuals who serve the common good,” the Bishop said. “Our vision for Catholic schools in this Diocese is simply stated — we want to do everything possible to make a Catholic school educa-tion available for as many as possi-ble,” the Bishop said. “To achieve this noble goal, we must be practi-cal. Some of our buildings need expensive capital repairs well be-yond the means of a parish to han-SCHOOLS on 2 A TTHE 43 RD A NNUAL M ARCH FOR L IFE S1-S16 6-7 8 9 10-16 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS V IEWPOINT Y OUTH W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS PHOTO| COURTESY FATHER MICHAEL LEE A contingent of students from DePaul Catholic High School in Wayne, led by Father Michael Lee, chaplain/teacher, braved the oncoming blizzard on Jan. 22 by traveling to Washington, D.C. where they participated in the 43rd annual March For Life to be a voice for the unborn in the womb. For story, see page 5. Diocesan priests among those chosen by Pope as Missionaries of Mercy Pope to commission hundreds of priests from around the world during Ash Wednesday Mass By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR ROME Five priests from the Pater -son Diocese will join hundreds of priests from around the world on Feb. 10, Ash Wednesday, in St. Peter’s Basilica here to receive the mandate from Pope Francis to serve as Missionaries of Mercy — preachers of mercy and confessors filled with mercy — during his Jubilee Year of Mercy. These priests, selected by their bishops or religious superiors, also will concelebrate the Ash Wednesday Mass with the Holy Father and, before that, meet with him during an audience, where he will speak about their duties as Missionaries of Mercy. Those Diocesan priests who plan to travel to Rome to be sent forth by the Pope are: Father Paul Manning, executive director of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard, Madison, and diocesan vicar for evangelization; Msgr. John Hart, pastor of Assumption Parish, Morristown; Father Dariusz Kaminski, pastor of St. Stephen Parish, Paterson; and Father John Madrid, parochial vicar of St. Thomas the Apostle Parish, Oak Ridge, and St. John Vianney Parish, Stockholm. Father Geno Sylva, the English language official for the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangeliza -tion, already will be in Rome, be-cause he serves at the Vatican. Father Hernan Arias, vicar for pas-toral care and pastor of St. Mar -garet of Scotland Parish, Morris -town, said that he has not yet fi-nalized travel plans. Father Stanley Barron, pastor of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish, Flanders, has been designated as a Missionary of Mercy but will not be traveling to Rome. Pope Francis calls these Mission -aries of Mercy to become “a living sign of the Father’s welcome to all those in search of his forgiveness.” Also, they are to be “facilitators for all, with no one excluded, of a tru-ly human encounter;” “a source of liberation, rich with responsibility for overcoming obstacles and tak-ing up the new life of Baptism PRIESTS on 4

Repositioning Catholic Schools For Success

Building projects, consolidations, mergers address future growth and sustainability

CLIFTON To ensure the ability to provide the best, most sustainable Catholic school education to families in the Diocese of Paterson, several schools will embark on a comprehensive, strategic repositioning plan for the long-term viability and vitality of Catholic education in Passaic, Morris and Sussex counties.

“Catholic education is a priority for the Diocese of Paterson. It is a privileged way to accomplish the Church’s primary mission of evangelization,” said Bishop Serratelli.

“In our diverse society, the Catholic school is an institutional commitment on our part to contribute to the good of all society by educating students with academic excellence and forming them to bring the power of faith to improve society with the knowledge that they gain. Catholic schools remain one of the best ways to nourish faith in Jesus, a love of the Church and a commitment to serve others, especially the poor. Working together with parents, who have the first responsibility for their children, the Catholic school helps prepare students to take their place in society as well-educated, responsible, moral individuals who serve the common good,” the Bishop said.

“Our vision for Catholic schools in this Diocese is simply stated — we want to do everything possible to make a Catholic school education available for as many as possible,” the Bishop said. “To achieve this noble goal, we must be practical.Some of our buildings need expensive capital repairs well beyond the means of a parish to handle them. As enrollments decline in some schools, we must develop models for larger and stronger schools in order that a Catholic school education will continue to be available.”

Sussex County

The Catholic Academy of Sussex County will realign its elementary schools into a single campus in Sparta and open a new middle school serving grades 5-7 beginning in the 2016-2017 school year, as a way to best provide continued and exemplary Catholic education to its students in a fiscally responsible manner.

Using a first-of-its-kind university-style campus model, the existing Rev. George A. Brown Memorial School in Sparta will become the linchpin property for pre-k through fourthgrade students with additional buildings on the present Pope John campus between Rev. Brown and Pope John to provide space for all of the students from the sending districts.

The thriving high school (grades 8-12) will continue to operate at Pope John XXIII Regional High School, although there are also plans to provide additional facilities for the necessary growth. Soon ground will be broken to construct Pope John Middle School, a $4.5 million, 22,000-square foot building on the Pope John campus that will house students in grades 5-7.

“I congratulate the Catholic school community in Sussex County,” said Bishop Serratelli. “They are embarking on an exciting and promising adventure. The leadership of parents, school supporters, pastors, and Msgr. Kieran McHugh, has resulted in an innovative approach for the future of Catholic school education in this area of our diocese.

“In the past, Catholic schools usually relied on a single parish to support a single school.The realignment of our schools in Sussex County is the result of the school communities’ strong commitment to follow our diocesan vision, using our resources wisely and making Catholic school education available for the present and the future,” the Bishop said.

“We are blessed to be a part of a Diocese that truly values the importance of Catholic education and has approved our plan for the new Academy structure,” said Msgr. McHugh, president of the Academy.

“This new plan will guarantee that Catholic education will remain a growing and vitally important part of living in and around Sussex County for generations to come.” This new structure is being made possible though the extraordinary financial support from both the Diocese and the Pope John XXIII Endowment Fund – both of which have made $1 million commitments to this project.

As part of this plan, the elementary schools that have serviced Sussex County students — Immaculate Conception Regional School in Franklin, St. Joseph Regional School in Newton and St. Michael School in Netcong — will all consolidate into the Rev. Brown and Pope John campus for the 2016-2017 school year.

Helping day-to-day administration with the construction and implementation of this plan has been the Catholic Academy’s Board of Trustees — comprised of a diverse and vitally important mix of clergy, parents, community leaders and alumni. It has been involved every step of the way and has endorsed this plan and the structure of the Academy. The board will continue to provide guidance and oversight to the Academy and will look to add new members as sending districts expand.

“The board is excited to see this plan take effect and believes the current Administration of the Academy has laid out a plan that will make sure that our children and their children have access to Catholic education,” said Mark Young, president of the board.

The Academy administration has been working closely with the Diocesan leadership, the Diocesan Schools Office, Academy trustees and the Pope John Endowment trustees to craft this plan for the past several years.

“Without question this will represent a major change for everyone — students, teachers and staff. Change, in any form, is never easy and always tests us,” Msgr. McHugh said.“However, everyone who will be associated with this Academy will be committed to making this as easy a transition as possible. Each individual school has a dedicated group of supporters who have stood by them for generations.We expect the Catholic Academy to deepen these relationships for years to come.”

The Academy has already started its planning for satisfying the infrastructure needs that additional students will require.

“With the additional space and classrooms in this plan, we believe we will be able to maintain reasonable class sizes and make sure that all of our students get the same high level of attention and services that they deserve from our teachers,” said Craig Austin, vice president of Institutional Advancement for the Academy. “We will provide distinct facilities for all of our students. The high school students and the third-grade students, for example, are not going to be bumping into each other in the same hallways every day.”

Academy leadership met with parents about this plan on Jan. 27. Similar meetings will be held in the next few weeks with other groups of constituents to answer questions and share the Academy leadership’s excitement about these plans.

“In working together to assemble this plan, we had to consider many parties – staff, faculty, parents and administration. But our main concern was with our students, from their first day in pre-k to the day they leave us for college,” said Susan Santore, principal of the Rev. Brown elementary school. “It’s our responsibility to provide our students with an education that is academically challenging, steeped in the teachings of the Gospels, and prepares them to be successful members of society. In order to do this we must be able to provide our students with a cutting-edge curriculum infused with state-of-the-art technology. The consolidated campus will allow us to provide these opportunities to all of our students.”

Passaic County

Due to a steep decline in enrollment and financial debt, Blessed Sacrament School in Paterson, with an enrollment of 83 students, will close at the end of this school year.

“The Diocese remains committed to serving the students of Blessed Sacrament School.There isn’t a more important mission than ensuring that our young people have accessibility, affordability and availability to a Catholic education,” said Mary Baier, diocesan superintendent of schools. “This is a challenging time for everyone. We will assist each family who wishes to continue a Catholic education for their child in one of our many nearby Catholic schools including: St. Gerard in Paterson, St. Brendan, St. Philip, and St. Andrew in Clifton, Academy of St. Francis in Totowa and St. Anthony in Hawthorne, and any other school parents want to chose for their child. Our focus is to make this transition less difficult for students, faculty, staff, and parents.

“We will also be working with faculty members, assisting them to continue their teaching vocation with our diocesan system,” she said, “and we affirm the courage, faith and hard work of the faculty, staff and families at Blessed Sacrament.”

Morris County

In Rockaway, Sacred Heart School will merge into neighboring St. Cecilia School for the fall term. The name of the merged schools will be announced at a later date. With both schools’ enrollments hovering in the 140 to 160 range, the merger will allow all students to be accommodated as a single student body in one building with the shared support of both Sacred Heart Parish and St. Cecilia Parish, both under the leadership of Father Sigmund Peplowski, pastor. Sacred Heart and St. Cecilia are located less than one mile from each other.

In East Hanover, St. Rose of Lima Academy will be restructured into the St. Rose of Lima Early Childhood Academy to serve the community from its strengths. The elementary and middle school portion of the academy will close in June. The decision was the result of the growth of the current early childhood program, the dwindling enrollment, which in the last four years numbered 40 percent of the student body — with a projected enrollment of just 68 students for the fall term — and the steady climb in parish’s subsidy to the academy, according to Father Owen Moran, St. Rose’s pastor,

“I love the Academy of St. Rose and am very proud of the children,” said Father Moran.“My hope is that they will be able to continue in the Catholic school system. With this in mind, I have approached the principals of St. Vincent’s, (Madison) St. Patrick’s (Chatham) and Assumption (Morristown). All three schools can take the entire seventh grade plus their siblings. I would hope to be able to keep all the children together and provide a bus going and returning to St. Rose every day.”

“I’m very proud of our Early Childhood Center. The quality of education in a Christ-centered atmosphere really empowers the little ones to be well prepared for kindergarten,” the pastor said. “This program has continued to flourish and the classes are full. I do see it as an important part of evangelization to educate not only the children but also the parents. I’m happy to say we will be able to retain the Early Childhood Center and that all pre-k-4 children will be invited and strongly encouraged to enter kindergarten in one of our local Catholic schools.

In Madison, Bishop Serratelli turned over a ceremonial shovelful of soil Jan. 4 to break ground on a $2 million, two-story 5,964- square-foot building addition to St. Vincent Martyr School in Madison that will open in the fall to provide needed room for a student population that has grown fourfold in recent years since the re-establishment of middleschool grades.

Designed to match the existing school building, the addition will house classrooms on each of its two levels, as well as a state-of-the-art science room, ready for STEM [Science, Technology, Engineering and Math] instruction.St. Vincent’s has already raised $1.85 million of the $2 million needed for the project.

“It’s wonderful that we are expanding,” said Sister of Charity Noreen Holly, principal, who noted that St. Vincent’s students hail not only from Madison but also from other municipalities, including East Hanover, Chatham, Florham Park, Morristown and Summit.

“St. Vincent Martyr School is thriving,” Msgr. George Hundt said. “We have a school population that believes in the value of Catholic education — and that brings forth success.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Repositioning+Catholic+Schools+For+Success/2379606/288867/article.html.

Diocesan Priests Among Those Chosen By Pope As Missionaries Of Mercy

Michael Wojcik

Pope to commission hundreds of priests from around the world during Ash Wednesday Mass

ROME Five priests from the Pater - son Diocese will join hundreds of priests from around the world on Feb. 10, Ash Wednesday, in St. Peter’s Basilica here to receive the mandate from Pope Francis to serve as Missionaries of Mercy — preachers of mercy and confessors filled with mercy — during his Jubilee Year of Mercy. These priests, selected by their bishops or religious superiors, also will concelebrate the Ash Wednesday Mass with the Holy Father and, before that, meet with him during an audience, where he will speak about their duties as Missionaries of Mercy.

Those Diocesan priests who plan to travel to Rome to be sent forth by the Pope are: Father Paul Manning, executive director of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard, Madison, and diocesan vicar for evangelization; Msgr. John Hart, pastor of Assumption Parish, Morristown; Father Dariusz Kaminski, pastor of St. Stephen Parish, Paterson; and Father John Madrid, parochial vicar of St. Thomas the Apostle Parish, Oak Ridge, and St. John Vianney Parish, Stockholm. Father Geno Sylva, the English language official for the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization, already will be in Rome, because he serves at the Vatican. Father Hernan Arias, vicar for pastoral care and pastor of St. Margaret of Scotland Parish, Morris - town, said that he has not yet finalized travel plans. Father Stanley Barron, pastor of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish, Flanders, has been designated as a Missionary of Mercy but will not be traveling to Rome.

Pope Francis calls these Missionaries of Mercy to become “a living sign of the Father’s welcome to all those in search of his forgiveness.” Also, they are to be “facilitators for all, with no one excluded, of a truly human encounter;” “a source of liberation, rich with responsibility for overcoming obstacles and taking up the new life of Baptism again;” “guided by the words, ‘For God has consigned all to disobedience, that he may have mercy upon all’;” “inspiring preachers of Mercy;” “heralds of the joy of forgiveness” and “welcoming, loving, and compassionate confessors, who are most especially attentive to the difficult situations of each person,” according to the Pontifical Council’s website about the Jubilee Year of Mercy, at www.im.va.

“This will be exciting. Priests, along with everyone, are called to speak of the mercy of God and Jesus is the face of God,” said Msgr. Hart, who has not yet met Pope Francis. “Mercy is at the heart of the Gospel. Mercy is unique to Catholicism and the Church. The world needs God’s mercy,” he said.

Bishops in the countries of these 850 priests worldwide — 100 from the U.S. — will invite them give missions or specific initiatives for the Holy Year, with particular attention to Reconciliation. The Holy Father will grant them the authority to pardon even those sins reserved to the Holy See, including violation or profanation of the Holy Eucharist, states the website of the Pontifical Council, which Pope Francis has entrusted with the organization of the Jubilee Year of Mercy.

Msgr. Hart called the Pope’s sending forth of Missionaries of Mercy a “historical moment.” He plans to spend time in reflection and walk through the Holy Doors in the four major cathedrals in Rome: St. Peter’s, St. Paul Outside the Walls, the Archbasilica of St. John in the Lateran and the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore. He also plans to celebrate daily Mass in St. Peter’s in the morning.

Father Kaminski wanted to become a Missionary of Mercy, in part, because of his deep connection to the devotion to Divine Mercy. He was born in Bialystok, where Blessed Michael Sopocko, spiritual director of St. Faustina, who promoted the devotion, died, and also because Bishop Serratelli has approved the Eucharistic Missionaries of Divine Mercy at St. Stephen’s. Recently, parishioners held a special prayer service for Father Kaminski in anticipation of his trip to Rome.

“The Holy Father wants us Missionaries of Mercy to be preachers of mercy, but also to be patient and merciful confessors,” said Father Kaminski, who will meet Pope Francis and visit Rome for the first time, although he had previously met St. John Paul II, who designated the Sunday after Easter as Divine Mercy Sunday.

Father Madrid expressed excitement about meeting Pope Francis for the first time, having attended several events during the Pontiff’s first visit to the U.S. in September. Like the rest of the missionaries, he secured Bishop Serratelli’s endorsement, applied to become a Missionary of Mercy and received a letter from the Pontifical Council, notifying him that he was accepted.

Yet Father Arias of St. Margaret’s, the location of one of two Holy Doors in the diocese, along with Holy Rosary Church, Passaic, remains unsure whether he wants to leave his congregation on Ash Wednesday. He noted that priests do not have to attend the ceremony in Rome to become Missionaries of Mercy.

“I believe in the mercy of God and that we see mercy in Jesus. We are to carry that mercy to people and bring them the ‘Good News,’ ” Father Arias said. “We are to welcome everyone into the Kingdom of God. Also, we are to be compassionate, accepting, and forgiving of sinners and those people, who have been marginalized by society and the Church,” the pastor said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Diocesan+Priests+Among+Those+Chosen+By+Pope+As+Missionaries+Of+Mercy/2379608/288867/article.html.

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