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The Beacon The Beacon November 19, 2015 : Page 1

‘DISAPPOINTED’ BISHOPS ASK WHY CATHOLIC HOSPITALS EXCLUDED IN PLAN SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. 2 MORRIS NOVEMBER 19, 2015 11 4 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Appeal supports Catholic Charities agency serving adults with disabilities By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER BISHOP INVITES YOUNG MEN TO SAY ‘YES’ TO GOD AT VOCATION AWARENESS EVENT 9 INNERCITY STUDENTS AT CATHOLIC SCHOOLS THANK THE SIMON FOUNDATION 8 10 11 12-13 14-20 Y OUTH O BITUARIES W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS OAK RIDGE If only one word could be used to describe the group homes of diocesan Catholic Charities Department for Persons with Disabilities (DPD), “family” would be the word. Just a single vis-it to a DPD group home would show the loving family environ-ment that is evident every day of the year. The agency, which serves adults with developmental or intellectual disabilities, was founded more than 50 years ago by Msgr. John Wehrlen as the Diocese’s response to the needs of people with disabilities and their families. DPD offers a chance for those with disabilities to become more active and valued members of society and to participate fully in a life with dignity and peace. Because of this and as a part of the diocesan Catholic Charities family, the Bishop’s Annual 2015 Appeal supports the works of DPD to ensure those with disabili-ties are never forgotten. Under the theme, “Serving Christ Among Us,” the 2015 Bishop’s Annual Appeal will help DPD continue its mission along with other Catholic Charities’ agencies and will also provide assis-tance to inner-city ele-mentary school students at diocesan Catholic schools; to the educa-tion of diocesan semi-narians, and to Nazareth Village, the retired priests residence in Chester. Scott Milliken, the DPD’s exec-utive director, said, “When you donate to the Bishop’s Annual Appeal, you are giving to DPD and thus, directly helping people in need. DPD is a Catholic organi-zation, one of the very few Catholic agencies that fulfills this sort of mission. Catholic values and social teaching are at the core of everything we do.” ANNUAL APPEAL on 6 SING A JOYFUL SONG The children’s choir at St. Patrick Parish in Chatham BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI sing Nov. 8 during Mass marking the 32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, which was celebrated by Bishop Serratelli during his pastoral visit to the church. For more photos, see page 7. DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS FAITH FRIDAY FORMATION SERIES Succasunna pastor explores meaning of Nicene Creed By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR SUCCASUNNA How well do you think you understand the state-ments of faith in the Creed that you recite at Mass every Sunday such as our belief as Catholics in the Communion of Saints? An eager group of parishioners from St. Therese here have been asking themselves that very ques-tion, while also examining many statements or phrases in the Nicene Creed, during an eight-week faith-formation series on Friday mornings, called Faith Fridays. Father Marc Mancini, St. Therese’s pastor, has been leading these 90-minute sessions — a mix of traditional classroom-type teach-ing, video instruction, lively discus-sion and probing questions. During Mass, we Catholics anticipate recit-ing a profession of our faith in ei-ther the Nicene Creed or the earli-er Apostles’ Creed. “We recite the Creed every Sunday, but are we aware of what we are reciting and what it means to us? So it’s a good idea to focus on the statements that are in the Creed,” said Father Mancini, who devised the Friday Fridays series — new to St. Therese — and its top-ic: “The Nicene Creed: Our Profes -sion of Faith.” “The participants — most of whom have been involved regularly in Bible study here — en-joy being engaged in conversation about our Catholic faith.” The 10 to 11:30 a.m. sessions started Oct. 2 and have explored the following statements or phrases in the Creed: “We believe in one God,” “Jesus Christ, the only Son of God,” “He came down from Heaven…and he rose again,” “He ascended into Heaven…and his kingdom will have no end,” “the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life” and “We believe in one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church.” Last week, the group, which meets in St. Therese’s all-purpose room, ex-plored “the Communion of Saints” — perfect for November, when the Church prays for souls in Purgatory. Tomorrow, they will end the series by covering “We look forward to the resurrection of the dead…life of the world to come.” In Nov. 13 session, Father Mancini explored the Communion of Saints, noting that Catholic doc-trine calls it “a spiritual solidarity, which binds together the faithful on Earth, the souls in purgatory and the saints in heaven in the organic unity of the same mystical body under Christ, its head.” FAITH FRIDAY on 9

Appeal Supports Catholic Charities Agency Serving Adults With Disabilities

Cecile San Agustin

OAK RIDGE If only one word could be used to describe the group homes of diocesan Catholic Charities Department for Persons with Disabilities (DPD), “family” would be the word. Just a single visit to a DPD group home would show the loving family environment that is evident every day of the year.

The agency, which serves adults with developmental or intellectual disabilities, was founded more than 50 years ago by Msgr. John Wehrlen as the Diocese’s response to the needs of people with disabilities and their families. DPD offers a chance for those with disabilities to become more active and valued members of society and to participate fully in a life with dignity and peace. Because of this and as a part of the diocesan Catholic Charities family, the Bishop’s Annual Appeal supports the works of DPD to ensure those with disabilities are never forgotten.

Under the theme, “Serving Christ Among Us,” the 2015 Bishop’s Annual Appeal will help DPD continue its mission along with other Catholic Charities’ agencies and will also provide assistance to inner-city elementary school students at diocesan Catholic schools; to the education of diocesan seminarians, and to Nazareth Village, the retired priests residence in Chester.

Scott Milliken, the DPD’s executive director, said, “When you donate to the Bishop’s Annual Appeal, you are giving to DPD and thus, directly helping people in need. DPD is a Catholic organization, one of the very few Catholic agencies that fulfills this sort of mission. Catholic values and social teaching are at the core of everything we do.”

Currently, DPD serves 74 individuals in its residential programs, 57 people at its Gruenert Center, a vocational day program in Lake Hopatcong, and a countless number of additional people who receive spiritual, vocational, recreational and educational support. DPD’s operations include nine group homes, two supervised apartments and a vocational day program. In addition, they provide support coordination for individuals who live in Sussex County, recreational activities and pastoral care.

DPD is currently growing. In December, its 12th residential program, Giuliano House will be opening in Jefferson Township. Giuliano House will serve four medically needy individuals who are currently living in developmental centers. In 2016, DPD will be constructing a greenhouse where people with disabilities will work and be involved in the community. This expansion has been made possible through contributions like those that have been given to the Bishop’s Annual Appeal.

Even with DPD’s expansion, there is a great need for services. Because of its personalized care, there are more than 8,000 people on a waiting list to get into programs like DPD offers.

Donations from the Appeal to the DPD are always directed toward direct support and are never used for administrative costs. In the past, Bishop’s Annual Appeal funds have been used to help the DPD with necessary home repairs, unbudgeted expenses, program upgrades, recreational activities and to make necessary program modifications to allow the individuals who live in the programs “age in place.”

Just recently, Appeal money helped a client, who lived at DPD group homes for 43 years. Joe Duffy said, “Eleanor Siegrist recently passed away after a two-year battle with cancer. Eleanor had no blood relatives but more than 100 other residents of our homes and current and former staff and their families came to know and love her and attended her funeral.”

The Appeal helped to pay for her funeral expenses and the repast as well as simple gifts for Eleanor when she was in the hospital in her final months. Many of the residents have no family or if they have family they are unable to assist in the clients’ care. Duffy said, “The Appeal money greatly helps to provide a good quality of life for all.”

To learn more about the Department for Persons with Disabilities, the agency invites the faithful to join its Facebook page, which is frequently updated or visit its website at www.dpd.org. They also encourage tours of its group homes and vocational center to see firsthand the work and ministry they do in serving those with disabilities and ensuring they are cared for with love and respect.

Chris Brancato, director of development at DPD, said, “We can’t thank all those who give to the Bishop’s Annual Appeal enough. Your support helps make a lasting impact on the lives of God’s special people and the entire DPD family is very appreciative of your generosity.”

[To support the 2015 Bishop’s Annual Appeal with a pledge, visit the diocesan website at www.rcdop.org and click on Bishop’s Annual Appeal or contact the diocesan development office at (973) 777-8818, ext. 215 or 218. For information on the DPD visit www.dpd.org. To arrange a visit call (973) 406-1100. ]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Appeal+Supports+Catholic+Charities+Agency+Serving+Adults+With+Disabilities/2326959/281506/article.html.

Faith Friday Formation Series

Michael Wojcik

SUCCASUNNA How well do you think you understand the statements of faith in the Creed that you recite at Mass every Sunday such as our belief as Catholics in the Communion of Saints?

An eager group of parishioners from St. Therese here have been asking themselves that very question, while also examining many statements or phrases in the Nicene Creed, during an eightweek faith-formation series on Friday mornings, called Faith Fridays. Father Marc Mancini, St. Therese’s pastor, has been leading these 90-minute sessions — a mix of traditional classroom-type teaching, video instruction, lively discussion and probing questions. During Mass, we Catholics anticipate reciting a profession of our faith in either the Nicene Creed or the earlier Apostles’ Creed.

“We recite the Creed every Sunday, but are we aware of what we are reciting and what it means to us? So it’s a good idea to focus on the statements that are in the Creed,” said Father Mancini, who devised the Friday Fridays series — new to St. Therese — and its topic: “The Nicene Creed: Our Profession of Faith.” “The participants — most of whom have been involved regularly in Bible study here — enjoy being engaged in conversation about our Catholic faith.”

The 10 to 11:30 a.m. sessions started Oct. 2 and have explored the following statements or phrases in the Creed: “We believe in one God,” “Jesus Christ, the only Son of God,” “He came down from Heaven…and he rose again,” “He ascended into Heaven…and his kingdom will have no end,” “the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life” and “We believe in one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church.” Last week, the group, which meets in St. Therese’s all-purpose room, explored “the Communion of Saints” — perfect for November, when the Church prays for souls in Purgatory. Tomorrow, they will end the series by covering “We look forward to the resurrection of the dead…life of the world to come.”

In Nov. 13 session, Father Mancini explored the Communion of Saints, noting that Catholic doctrine calls it “a spiritual solidarity, which binds together the faithful on Earth, the souls in purgatory and the saints in heaven in the organic unity of the same mystical body under Christ, its head.

“The participants [in the Communion of Saints] are called saints by reason of their destination and of their partaking of the fullest of the Redemption of Christ,” said Father Mancini, who noted a fact that members of the study group realized immediately when reading his handouts: that the damned are excluded. “The living, even if they do not belong to the body of the Catholic Church, share in it [the Communion of Saints] according to the measure of their union with Christ and with the soul of the Church,” the priest said.

Father Mancini told participants that we could unite ourselves with the faithful departed through prayer and sacrifice, such as the Mass, while they can unite with us by interceding on our behalf.

“Being more closely united to Christ, those who dwell in heaven fix the whole Church more firmly in holiness…They do not cease to intercede with the Father for us, as they proffer the merits, which they acquired on Earth through the one mediator between God and men, Christ Jesus...So by their fraternal concerns is our weakness greatly helped,” participants read from section 956 of the “The Catechism of the Catholic Church” on a handout that morning.

Father Mancini offered many salient insights — mixed with his occasional offbeat humor —about the Communion of Saints. In between his teachings, he answered questions from participants, such as, “Why do we pray for the dead?” The priest replied, “Leaves die but people do not die. We take on a different form after death.”

Participant Gene Galan made a reference to the game Monopoly, when asking Father Mancini, “Why do we pray for those souls in Purgatory? For them, is it like getting a Get Out of Jail Free Card?” Members laughed, before the priest replied in all seriousness, “No, but we all must be prepared to receive the heavenly banquet. We are praying for those souls that are being purified.”

Toward the end of the Nov. 13 session, Father Mancini spoke about the Church’s formal canonization process for saints and about incorruptibility: that the bodies of many of them have not decomposed. He showed a video about the incorruptibility of saints, such Bernadette, Padre Pio and John Bosco, and another short clip about the types of relics of the saints.

Sometimes participants become the teachers, as with Dr. Lucy Balko, a retired physician, who spoke about the miracle of incorruptibility.

“When all systems fail, our bodies start to disintegrate. There’s nothing we can do about it — eventually we will turn to dust. So it [incorruptibility] happens because of God — not us,” Balko said.

After last week’s session, Galan told The Beacon that he enjoyed the Faith Friday sessions, because “I like the interaction.

It’s not just about sitting here and listening. Everyone gets a chance to express his or her views.”

“It’s very interesting, because it gives us a deeper meaning and insights to what we are doing, when we recite the Creed,” Galan said.

Another participant, Irene Preuss, said, “We see Father Marc up on the altar every Sunday for Mass. It’s great to see him in a different light as a teacher.”

Father Mancini noted that he learned a great deal about the Creed, when preparing the sessions. He received some help teaching from Father Andres Baquero, a St. Therese parochial vicar.

“I hope that Faith Fridays gave participants a better understanding of what the words of the Creed mean. I hope that they go from reciting the Creed to internalizing it,” Father Mancini said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Faith+Friday+Formation+Series/2326960/281506/article.html.

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