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The Beacon The Beacon November 12, 2015 : Page 1

7 CA THOLI C C H A RITIE S HONOR S 5 WITH CA RIT AS A W A RD S SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS NOVEMBER 12, 2015 S ILVER & G OLD M ASS 16 2 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-El-lard BI S HOP IN S T A LL S P AS TOR OF TWO W A YNE P A RI S HE S Teens perform acts of mercy as part of youth ministry challenge for upcoming Holy Year of Mercy By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER 30 D AYS OF A CTS OF M ERCY 10 C H A TH A M P A RI S HIONER’ S D A D PROTE C TED THE POPE 8 11 14-15 16 18-23 Y OUTH O BITUARIES V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Beverly and Joseph Cuccinelli, parishioners of Our Lady of the Holy Angels in Little Falls, hold hands as they renew their wedding vows before Bishop Serratelli at the Diocese’s annual Silver and Gold Mass Nov. 7 in St. Mary Church in Denville. The Cuccinellis are celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary this year. For story and more photos, please turn to pages 12 and 13. WAYNE Armed with a kind heart and a smart phone, typical of any Catholic teenager, members of Annunciation Parish’s Youth Ministry here have been going around the community doing random acts of mercy and docu-menting these moments on video camera. These random acts of mercy are part of a 30-day challenge to mark the upcoming Holy Year of Mercy, which was designated by Pope Francis, that will be cele-brated in the Catholic Church worldwide. The yearlong celebra-tion will begin Dec. 8 on the Feast of the Immaculate Con -ception and end Nov. 20, 2016 on the Feast of Christ the King. Before the school year began in September, the Wayne youth group gathered together and learned about the corporal and spiritual works of mercy, which call Catholics to serve those who are hungry, homeless, sick, and those experiencing spiritual suf-fering. “In anticipation for the Year of Mercy, we thought it was impor-tant that we are really called into action,” said Elise Rossbach, youth minister at Annunciation. “The young people took the time to do these acts and even use their own money to sometimes share a gift for the deed.” The challenge began with youth ministry members at An -nun ciation each taking a month to perform one act of mercy every day for an entire month. Rich Rossbach, a senior at Wayne Hills High School, took the month of September and set the tone for the rest of his peers. Rossbach decided to record each 30 DAYS on 6 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS RESPECT LIFE MASS Bishop urges faithful to bring God’s Word as truth to relativistic culture By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR PARSIPPANY The rules and laws of nature and science make no room for tolerances in fields such as chemistry with its precise for-mulas and mechanics with its ex-acting measurements. Likewise, we must seek to change the hearts and minds of people in a society that has grown more toler-ant of the “culture of death” — and its promotion of the evils of abortion, doctor-assisted suicide and euthanasia — which defy God’s truth, natural laws and plans for our lives. That’s what Bishop Serratelli told the faithful of the Paterson Diocese, who filled St. Ann Church here Nov. 7 for the annu-al Respect Life Mass, sponsored by the Paterson Federation of the Knights of Columbus. The Bishop was the main celebrant and homilist of the 10 a.m. liturgy — formally known as the Mass for the Unborn — where local clergy, religious and laity came together in prayer and mutual support for protecting all human life, born and unborn. “God says to each of us today, ‘Thou shall not kill,’ Taking inno-cent lives destroys society itself,” said Bishop Serratelli during his homily. “The Creator actually has a plan for our well-being. He has gradually been revealing that plan by His Word. Only in God’s Word is there truth. The Gospels are the ultimate source of what is good, right and holy in God’s eyes. It is only by living out that Word in our lives and bringing God’s Word to those, who are morally confused, that the truth will be able to set all of us free to enjoy the precious gift of life,” he said. The Lord’s truth will help guide our moral actions through the confusion brought about by a relativistic culture that “tells us that everybody’s truth is equal and, therefore, everyone of us has to be tolerant,” said Bishop Serratelli during the Mass, concel-ebrated by many priests of the diocese. “Tolerance has become the moral standard of the actions of society today and tolerance is a very faulty standard. Some people tell us — our political leaders, the elites in the universities and, at RESPECT LIFE MASS on 4

30 Days Of Acts Of Mercy

Cecile San Agustin

Teens perform acts of mercy as part of youth ministry challenge for upcoming Holy Year of Mercy

WAYNE Armed with a kind heart and a smart phone, typical of any Catholic teenager, members of Annunciation Parish’s Youth Ministry here have been going around the community doing random acts of mercy and documenting these moments on video camera.

These random acts of mercy are part of a 30-day challenge to mark the upcoming Holy Year of Mercy, which was designated by Pope Francis, that will be celebrated in the Catholic Church worldwide. The yearlong celebration will begin Dec. 8 on the Feast of the Immaculate Con - ception and end Nov. 20, 2016 on the Feast of Christ the King.

Before the school year began in September, the Wayne youth group gathered together and learned about the corporal and spiritual works of mercy, which call Catholics to serve those who are hungry, homeless, sick, and those experiencing spiritual suffering.

“In anticipation for the Year of Mercy, we thought it was important that we are really called into action,” said Elise Rossbach, youth minister at Annunciation. “The young people took the time to do these acts and even use their own money to sometimes share a gift for the deed.”

The challenge began with youth ministry members at An - nun ciation each taking a month to perform one act of mercy every day for an entire month.

Rich Rossbach, a senior at Wayne Hills High School, took the month of September and set the tone for the rest of his peers. Rossbach decided to record each of the merciful acts using his smart phone’s video camera and edited it to a seven-minute video.

Because he used his smart phone to document these acts, the video was shown to his parish community, including younger peers in the Confirmation program and middle school students to inspire them to do the same.

Most of the acts Rossbach performed were for strangers around his community. He delivered Bibles to the Passaic County Jail in Paterson with a note saying he was praying for the prisoners. Another act he did was to visit an abandoned gravesite, where he put flowers on the grave and prayed for the souls of those who had passed away.

“I never thought these small things could change so many lives in a short period of time,” Rossbach said. “I could really see the gratitude and it was comforting knowing how much you can help someone.”

For Rossbach, one of his favorite moments was when he stood outside a health clinic with flowers. “When a woman came out after her doctor’s appointment, I handed her the flowers. At first, she was dumbfounded but then I explained what I was doing and she was so moved by it,” said Rossbach.

For many of the recipients, the response at first was one of confusion, said Rossbach. “At first, people would question the motives especially since we were recording the acts. They thought it was a prank. I understood this because I would wonder the same if someone was randomly doing an act of kindness for me. But as soon as someone knew what was happening, the response was overwhelmingly positive,” he said.

Meg Zimak, a junior at Wayne Valley High School, took the month of October and focused doing many of these acts for her classmates. She sent a get-well basket for a sick friend, wrote positive messages on sticky notes and posted them on the lockers of classmates, and carried equipment bags for the Color Guard and Marching Band at her school.

“While we documented these acts for the challenge, people do good deeds all the time but they just usually go undocumented,” said Zimak. “Doing this made me realize even the smallest thing can make someone’s day so much better even if it’s just holding a door open for someone with a smile.”

Msgr. Peter Doody, pastor at Annunciation, said he is inspired by the young people at his parish. “I think it’s phenomenal what these teenagers are doing. At the rectory, we were even surprised to be one of the recipients of one of these acts of mercy when we found a cake at our door. We wondered who sent it and soon learned it came from one of the young people.”

Because of the challenge, Msgr. Doody decided to extend it to the rest of the parish. A “mercy box” has been placed in back of the church for parishioners to share some of the acts they did and they will be recorded in the bulletin to give other parishioners ideas on how to be merciful.

Msgr. Doody said, “These teens are really great. It’s moving to see them in action and they have inspired the whole parish community for the upcoming Year of Mercy.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/30+Days+Of+Acts+Of+Mercy/2321861/280677/article.html.

Bishop Urges Faithful To Bring God's Word As Truth To Relativistic Culture

Michael Wojcik

PARSIPPANY The rules and laws of nature and science make no room for tolerances in fields such as chemistry with its precise formulas and mechanics with its exacting measurements. Likewise, we must seek to change the hearts and minds of people in a society that has grown more tolerant of the “culture of death” — and its promotion of the evils of abortion, doctor-assisted suicide and euthanasia — which defy God’s truth, natural laws and plans for our lives.

That’s what Bishop Serratelli told the faithful of the Paterson Diocese, who filled St. Ann Church here Nov. 7 for the annual Respect Life Mass, sponsored by the Paterson Federation of the Knights of Columbus. The Bishop was the main celebrant and homilist of the 10 a.m. liturgy — formally known as the Mass for the Unborn — where local clergy, religious and laity came together in prayer and mutual support for protecting all human life, born and unborn.

“God says to each of us today, ‘Thou shall not kill,’ Taking innocent lives destroys society itself,” said Bishop Serratelli during his homily. “The Creator actually has a plan for our well-being. He has gradually been revealing that plan by His Word. Only in God’s Word is there truth. The Gospels are the ultimate source of what is good, right and holy in God’s eyes. It is only by living out that Word in our lives and bringing God’s Word to those, who are morally confused, that the truth will be able to set all of us free to enjoy the precious gift of life,” he said.

The Lord’s truth will help guide our moral actions through the confusion brought about by a relativistic culture that “tells us that everybody’s truth is equal and, therefore, everyone of us has to be tolerant,” said Bishop Serratelli during the Mass, concelebrated by many priests of the diocese.

“Tolerance has become the moral standard of the actions of society today and tolerance is a very faulty standard. Some people tell us — our political leaders, the elites in the universities and, at times, some within our Church — to tolerate abortion, euthanasia, doctor-assisted suicide, same-sex marriage and cohabitation,” Bishop Serratelli said. “The result of not accepting God’s Word as truth has been the death of innocent children, the breakdown of family life, the devaluation of the human person and disappearance of compassion and true charity.”

During the Respect Life Mass, chaired by Deacon Anthony Fierro of St. Bonaventure Parish, Paterson, those in attendance prayed intentions for all humans born and unborn. The liturgy represented the commitment of the Knights, the largest Catholic fraternal service organization, to pro-life issues. The faithful also included many deacons, religious sisters and laity, including families with children. Dignitaries included Bruce DeMolli, state deputy of the Knights from Our Lady of the Holy Angels Parish, Little Falls; Tom Ciborski, fraternal trainer from the Knights’ Supreme Office in Connecticut; and Dr. Mary Mazzarella, diocesan director of the Office of Respect Life.

After the Mass, Joseph Miller, chairman of the Paterson Federation, thanked Bishop Serratelli, concelebrating priests, assisting deacons and the faithful in attendance in their efforts to “honor human life in all of its forms from conception to natural death.” Afterward, congregants walked to the nearby parish hall for a light reception.

The prayers offered during the Mass and Bishop Serratelli’s insights during his homily resonated with participating faithful. At the reception, Wilfred Lara of St. Gerard Parish, Paterson, sat with his family, which includes his wife, Liz, and their children: 16-year-old Jonathan and 12-year-old Isabella.

“I want to teach my children about the gift of life, which is being taken for granted,” Lara said. “I like when Bishop Serratelli talked about the way we live today — following some rules, but not other rules, like Respect for Life. I found that interesting, because I work in the field of semiconductors, where we have no tolerances and have to be exact in our measurements to what the customer wants,” he said.

During the reception, Miller, a parishioner of Our lady Queen of Peace in the Hewitt section of West Milford told The Beacon that Bishop Serratelli asked that the annual liturgy of the Mass be changed to Respect Life Mass, because “he wanted to promote respect for all life, born and unborn.” Miller added, “We are concerned about everybody.”

Fervently committed to the cause of Respect for Life, the Knights — who also provided a honor guard that morning — engage in many endeavors to help stop abortion, such as providing for ultrasound machines in medical offices. They also lead initiatives that support life as lived now, such as fund drives for mentally challenged and people with Alzheimer’s disease and programs for children, such as sports and essay contests, Miller said.

Also at the reception was Deacon Fierro, a past grand Knight, who has organized the annual Respect Life Mass for six years. He thanked Bishop Serratelli, St. Ann’s, the priests and deacons, state and federation officers, his brother Knights, the Parsippany Council of the Knights that handled the refreshments and everyone who attended for their support.

“It’s humbling to have Bishop Serratelli here to celebrate the Mass. He expresses a deep value and respect for life, which I personally hold dear to my heart,” Deacon Fierro said.

At the conclusion of Mass, Bishop Serratelli thanked the Knights and participating priests and deacons, especially, Deacon Fierro, and issued to the congregation a challenge on behalf of Respect Life.

“It’s important to keep respect for life in all its forms. St. John Paul II spoke so strongly about the ‘culture of death’ that has been overtaking out modern civilization,” Bishop Serratelli said. “It will only be stopped and the great joy of human life that God gives us will be enjoyed only when we are faithful to what God asks of us and, without fear, speak the truth of our lives.”

“The result of not accepting God’s Word as truth has been the death of innocent children, the breakdown of family life, the devaluation of the human person and disappearance of compassion and true charity.” - BISHOP SERRATELLI

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Bishop+Urges+Faithful+To+Bring+God%27s+Word+As+Truth+To+Relativistic+Culture/2321862/280677/article.html.

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