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The Beacon The Beacon October 29 2015 : Page 1

15 CA THOLI C C H A RITIE S , P A RI S HE S A ID THO S E DI S PL AC ED IN P ASSA I C FIRE SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS OCTOBER 29, 2015 ‘#C OLLINS _F IGHT ’ 12 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Budd Lake parish rallies to support seventh-grader diagnosed with leukemia By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER 2 4 S YNOD DO C UMENT S TRONGLY B AC K S C HUR C H TE AC HING PRIE S T’ S A RTI C LE S UGGE S T S W A Y S TO IN S PIRE SAC R A MENT A L M A RRI A GE S 8-9 12 13-14 16 17-20 BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Y OUTH W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS ‘S AY Y ES L ORD ’ During the Confirmandi meeting with Bishop Serratelli Oct. 25, two Confirmation candidates do the hand gestures for the popular praise and worship song, “Trading My Sorrows” at Morris Catholic High School in Denville. This was the third and final meeting Bishop Serratelli had with young people from around the Diocese who will be confirmed by him next year. For story and more photos, see page 6. BUDD LAKE At St. Jude Parish here, parents, teachers and friends saw #Collins_Fight trending on their social media news feed. The hashtag was started by Collin’s parents Theresa and Brian Berg, parishioners at St. Jude’s, asking for support for their son, a sev-enth-grader at Mount Olive Mid -dle School, who was recently di-agnosed with Acute Lympho blastic Leukemia (ALL), the most com-mon form of childhood leukemia. “It went viral among the com-munity,” said Darlene Wade, reli-gious education coordinator at the Budd Lake parish. “Theresa did it to raise Collin’s spirits and every-one rallied behind it.” “We are so blessed and hum-bled by the outpouring of support of the community. This is a fight, we can’t fight alone,” Theresa Berg said. “Our faith is really strong and we certainly had to rely on our faith many times in the past. We lean on the people around us.” Because of Collin’s battle with leukemia, the religious education program recently wore orange shirts to support him and his fam-ily, which includes his younger brother, Logan and older sister, Marina. Collin’s mother said, “Sadly, many children are diagnosed with leukemia every year. Collin is among them. I think what made so many people compelled to rally around him is his spirit, determi-nation and will. Not every knows the story of how Collin entered the world but they see the chal-lenges he faces everyday and how he has overcome so much in his life already.” COLLIN on 10 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS ‘PROTECTING GOD’S CHILDREN’ Diocese is committed to the safety of its young people By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER CLIFTON Evangelizing and edu-cating youth are important mis-sions of the Catholic Church. And just as teaching young people about Jesus, protecting them from harm and creating safe environ-ments is also an important part of the Church’s mission. So much so, that last year alone in the Diocese, several thousand people were ed-ucated in how to prevent child sexual abuse. There are now more than 40,000 active employ-ees and volunteers who have Prevention programs teach thousands how to prevent child sexual abuse been trained. They work with tens of thousands of children and teens who have gone through the safe environment program. For more than a decade in the Paterson Diocese, parishes and diocesan schools have ensured the safety of young people through several child sexual abuse preven-tion policies and programs. Every employee and volunteer in the Paterson Diocese who has any role with children is required to undergo an extensive online crim-inal background check, sign a code of conduct and attend the Diocese’s child abuse prevention training program, “Protecting God’s Children.” This year almost 70 training sessions were held across the Diocese, in both English and Spanish. [For a list of upcoming sessions, see page 11.] “The Catholic Church has been watching out for children through sexual abuse prevention pro-grams. The Church in the U.S. has probably trained more people in the prevention of child abuse than any other organization,” said Thomas Barrett, diocesan coordi-nator of special projects. “In the Paterson Diocese, we have a ter-rific program and we know that it is protecting kids. We are also continually looking at ways to im-prove what we offer in the pro-gram so that the latest informa-tion from experts in the field are incorporated into our training.” GOD’S CHILDREN on 11

#Collins_Fight’

Cecile San Agustin

Budd Lake Parish Rallies To Support Seventh-Grader Diagnosed With Leukemia

BUDD LAKE At St. Jude Parish here, parents, teachers and friends saw #Collins_Fight trending on their social media news feed. The hashtag was started by Collin’s parents Theresa and Brian Berg, parishioners at St. Jude’s, asking for support for their son, a seventh- grader at Mount Olive Mid - dle School, who was recently diagnosed with Acute Lympho blastic Leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood leukemia.

“It went viral among the community,” said Darlene Wade, religious education coordinator at the Budd Lake parish. “Theresa did it to raise Collin’s spirits and everyone rallied behind it.”

“We are so blessed and humbled by the outpouring of support of the community. This is a fight. We can’t fight alone,” Theresa Berg said. “Our faith is really strong and we certainly had to rely on our faith many times in the past.

We lean on the people around us.” Because of Collin’s battle with leukemia, the religious education program recently wore orange shirts to support him and his family, which includes his younger brother, Logan and older sister, Marina.

Collin’s mother said, “Sadly, many children are diagnosed with leukemia every year. Collin is among them. I think what made so many people compelled to rally around him is his spirit, determination and will. Not every knows the story of how Collin entered the world but they see the challenges he faces everyday and how he has overcome so much in his life already.”

Berg said even before Collin was born, he suffered a stroke in utero and the location of the stroke was near the part of the brain that produces and controls the spinal fluid in his body. As a result of the stroke and its location, Collin has a condition called hydrocephalus. A few hours after Collin was born, things started to go very wrong. He had a grim prognosis and was given a very slim chance of making it through the night.

“I had just delivered Collin via c-section and against the nurses’ advisement I was brought to Collin’s bedside and we had him baptized that night. Collin made it through the night and continued to fight with an incredible will for the next eight weeks in the NICU at the hospital until we were finally discharged. It was really unclear what was ahead for Collin — every developmental milestone was delayed but eventually achieved due to his incredible determination. Collin began walking at 2-1/2 and talking shortly after,” said Berg.

The stroke also caused a right side hemiparetic cerebral palsy (right sided weakness). With the help of doctors and therapists, support and his own determination, Collin does many things most children do. He rock climbs, plays baseball, does karate and plays the French horn.

With Collin overcoming so much already, it was difficult for Collin and the family to hear about his diagnosis on Oct. 7. “We thought, why Collin? What else? The community’s outpouring of support, love and passion for Collin’s fight has inspired us to stop asking ‘why Collin’ and instead focus on the fight and beating Leukemia,” said Berg.

For the next three years, Collin will be treated for his illness and the parish and community plan to be there for him. This also includes the Sisters of Christian Charity in Mendham where prayers from Collin’s great aunt (his father’s aunt), Sister of Christian Charity Virginia Ann Barry, is a member of the order.

Father Antonio Gaviria, pastor of St. Jude’s, said, “The family are people of good faith. Even though, they are living this tough situation, they are trusting in God and they are putting everything in God’s hands.”

Wade said, “This is a special family, who are always there for other people and the town is really embracing his fight. Collin always has a smile on his face.” Right now the parish and local community are planning ways they can help the family in addition to prayers. They hope to have fund-raisers in the future for the medical costs and possibly help the family with a meals program since the family will be busy bringing Collin to his medical treatments.

“Each week, the children are also sending him cards so Collin is reminded that he is loved and supported,” said Wade.

With Collin’s fight, Father Gaviria also hopes parishes around the diocese pray for the middle schooler and other children that may have cancer in the Diocese. “It’s important we build a prayer chain because prayers really do work,” said Father Gaviria.

To the Berg family, Father Gaviria said, “May God strengthen them and continue to give the courage to navigate this journey. I hope everyone comes together to show our mercy as we prepare to celebrate the Year of Mercy as a Church. It’s a good sign when all get together for a family that needs prayers right now.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/%23Collins_Fight%E2%80%99/2309447/278726/article.html.

Diocese Is Committed To The Safety Of Its Young People

Cecile San Agustin

Prevention programs teach thousands how to prevent child sexual abuse

CLIFTON Evangelizing and educating youth are important missions of the Catholic Church. And just as teaching young people about Jesus, protecting them from harm and creating safe environments is also an important part of the Church’s mission. So much so, that last year alone in the Diocese, several thousand people were educated in how to prevent child sexual abuse. There are now more than 40,000 active employees and volunteers who have been trained. They work with tens of thousands of children and teens who have gone through the safe environment program.

For more than a decade in the Paterson Diocese, parishes and diocesan schools have ensured the safety of young people through several child sexual abuse prevention policies and programs. Every employee and volunteer in the Paterson Diocese who has any role with children is required to undergo an extensive online criminal background check, sign a code of conduct and attend the Diocese’s child abuse prevention training program, “Protecting God’s Children.” This year almost 70 training sessions were held across the Diocese, in both English and Spanish. [For a list of upcoming sessions, see page 11.]

“The Catholic Church has been role with children is required to undergo an extensive online criminal background check, sign a code of conduct and attend the Diocese’s child abuse prevention training program, “Protecting God’s Children.” This year almost 70 training sessions were held across the Diocese, in both English and Spanish. [For a list of upcoming sessions, see page 11.]

“The Catholic Church has been watching out for children through sexual abuse prevention programs. The Church in the U.S. has probably trained more people in the prevention of child abuse than any other organization,” said Thomas Barrett, diocesan coordinator of special projects. “In the Paterson Diocese, we have a terrific program and we know that it is protecting kids. We are also continually looking at ways to improve what we offer in the program so that the latest information from experts in the field are incorporated into our training.” In addition to employees and volunteers, every child attending a diocesan Catholic elementary and high school receives lessons two times a year to become aware of possible danger. Students in parish religious education programs also receive lessons to add onto the information they receive through their public schools on child abuse.

Because the Diocese is so strongly committed to keeping children safe, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) has affirmed in its audits the immense amount of work the Church of Paterson has done in preventing child abuse. In No - vember, the USCCB’s audit team will once again visit the diocese for its audit to ensure total compliance with the U.S. Bishop’s 2002 “Charter for the Pro tec - tion of Children and Young People.”

Joan Valk, diocesan director of human resources and child and youth protection who travels throughout the diocese to make sure parishes and schools have created safe environments, said, “Our children are taught that they have the right to let someone know if they ever feel unsafe or are in danger of being abused.”

According to Barrett, it is important for everyone to realize the possible danger signs for children that are now posed through the Internet. “We are now into the third generation of the program and while society has learned a lot about preventing abuse, sexual predators are determined to find a way to solicit new victims,” he said. “It’s important to attend these training sessions because often, someone who seems harmless can actually be harmful. And many times, nowadays, they may be hiding behind a computer screen interacting with children who do not know the danger that is lurking.”

Several volunteers, including law enforcement personnel, present the Pro - tecting God’s Children for Adults, in a three-hour program [see box at right]. Attendees learn about sexual abuse prevention, children who have been affected by abuse and the warning signs to spot possible predators and molesters in their communities.

“Many people come in not knowing what to expect and have their lives changed because they didn’t realize this is so common in the neighborhoods we live in. One out of five girls and one out of 20 boys are abused by their 18th birthday,” Barrett said.

Just recently, Sister of Christian Charity Joan Daniel, diocesan vice chancellor and delegate for religious, attended a training session again to update her knowledge on this important societal issue. “I attended several years ago but with my new ministry at the Diocese I thought it was important to renew my knowledge. I learned so much and you can never say you have learned enough. One thing that struck me was the possible dangers with technology and social media. Some teenagers create different social media accounts that their parents don’t know about giving predators an opportunity to take advantage of young people. With this new information and much more, I encourage those who have attended years ago to go again.”

In addition, the diocesan Child and Youth Protection Office assists those who have been abused and their families, who are suffering in the aftermath of the abuse. Peggy Zanello, the office’s Victim Assistance Coordinator, provides support and offers therapeutic services to victims of sex abuse. Anyone who sees a child facing any kind of abuse must report it to the local prosecutor’s office immediately. The Diocese is committed to making prompt and effective responses to allegations and assisting the prosecutor’s office in its investigation of any reports made to them of abuse involving any diocesan personnel.

During his visit to Philadelphia last month, Pope Francis spoke with victims abused by family members and clergy. He said to them, “Words cannot fully express my sorrow for the abuse you suffered. You are precious children of God who should always expect our protection, our care and our love. I am profoundly sorry that your innocence was violated by those whom you trusted. In some cases, the trust was betrayed by members of your own family, in other cases by priests who carry a sacred responsibility for the care of soul. In all circumstances, the betrayal was a terrible violation of human dignity.”

Participation in the Diocese’s safe environment programs are important, according to Barrett, because a key aspect of such programs is providing adequate supervision of children and educating adults to be aware of the signs of abuse and what to do in response.

Barrett said, “All the effort by the Church is working and making a difference. Everyone needs to get involved — from the priests and the religious to the laity, the children and their parents. If we work on this together, we can stop this horrific crime before it happens.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Diocese+Is+Committed+To+The+Safety+Of+Its+Young+People/2309450/278726/article.html.

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