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The Beacon The Beacon October 8 2015.pdf : Page 1

12 PRIME HE A LTH CA RE AC QUIRE S S T. C L A RE’ S HE A LTH S Y S TEM SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS OCTOBER 8, 2015 ‘C ATHOLICISM S PEAKS TO C APITALISM ’ 16 2 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Pope favors business practices that place human beings ‘at the center of economic life’ By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR S I S TER S OF C HRI S TI A N C H A RITY WORK WITH HE A LING THE C HILDREN 14 BI S HOP S ERR A TELLI, ROM A NI A N BI S HOP C ELEBR A TE M ASS A T P ASSA I C P A RI S H 6-7 10-1 1 16 18 20-23 BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI B LESSING W ITH R ELIC Bishop Serratelli blesses the congregation with a first-class relic of Blessed Sister Miriam Teresa Demjanovich during the Mass to mark the first anniversary of her beatification. The Mass was cel e brated in Holy Family Chapel at the Motherhouse of the Sisters of Charity in Convent Station Oct. 4. The relic was given to the Bishop by the Sisters of Charity and is now at the diocesan Chan cery Office. For more photos of the anniversary Mass, see page 5. V IEWPOINT Y OUTH W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS MADISON While most Americans gave an overwhelmingly warm recep-tion to Pope Francis and his open sense of kindness, compassion and hu-mility during his recent visit, a few took the opportunity of his historic trip to blast what they perceive as his pointed criticism of capitalism. But the fact is that the Pope has praised business as a “noble vocation,” while disapproving of business prac-tices — regardless of the economic system — that place the pursuit of profit over the needs of people, espe-cially the poor, said Philip Brach of The Catholic University of America, Washington, who spoke Oct. 1 on “Catholicism Speaks to Capitalism” at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. “Greed is not unique to anyone eco-nomic system but rather a condition of the fallen human condition. There are greedy lawyers and doctors and greedy capitalists and socialists,” said Brach, assistant dean of the School of Business and Economics. “The very survival of our free market economic system will rest on those business leaders who understand why and how to put the human person at the center of economic life,” he told his audience. Pope Francis speaks out against the excesses of business in general, including greed and the idolatry of money, consumerism, the exclusion of the poor and marginalized and the misuse of technology. So the pontiff offers the remedy for these ills: Catholic social teaching, which pro-motes the common good, human dig-nity, subsidiary and solidarity, Brach said. Pope Francis hopes to get people in business to think seriously about cor-porate social responsibility. “Money must serve, not rule!” (as he writes in apostolic exhortation, Evangelii Gaudium ), because people are much more important then capital: machin-ery, equipment, buildings and cash. In his encyclical Laudato Si’ , the Holy Father states, “The principle of the maximization of profits … reflects a misunderstanding of the very concept of the economy,” said Brach. Pope Francis blasts consumerism as TALK on 8 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS 2015 BISHOP’S ANNUAL APPEAL Appeal helps the poor in Passaic, Morris and Sussex counties By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER PATERSON With Pope Francis visiting clients of Catholic Charities in Washington, D.C. and Catholic Charities in New York City, he made a point to the world of the importance of re-membering the poor and recogniz-ing the agencies that serve those most in need. In his speech while visiting Catholic Charities in Washington, Pope Francis said, “The Son of God came into this world as a homeless person. The Son of God knew what it was to start life without a roof over his head. We can imag-ine what Joseph must have been thinking. How is it that the Son of God has no home? Why are we homeless, why don’t we have housing? These are questions which many of you may ask, and do ask, every day. Like St. Joseph, you may ask: ‘Why are we homeless, without a place to live?’ And those of us who do have a home, a roof over our heads, would also do well to ask: ‘Why do these, our brothers and 2015 sisters, have no place to live? Why are these brothers and sisters of ours homeless?’ Joseph’s questions are timely even today; they accom-pany all those who throughout history have been, and are, homeless.” The work of the Paterson Diocese’s Catholic Charities agency, Catholic Family and Community Services (CFCS), here reflects the words of Pope Francis during his United States visit about care and concern for the poor and underprivileged whether they be immigrants from a foreign land in Passaic County, an elderly grandmother in Morris County or a disabled adult in Sussex County. Every year, thousands and thousands of people in need turn to CFCS because they are at risk of losing their homes, in need of food or clothing or because of some other emergency, such as needing assistance with medical and utility bills. Last year, more than 70,000 people were served by the agencies of Catholic Charities in the Paterson Diocese. ANNUAL APPEAL on 9

‘Catholicism Speaks To Capitalism’

Michael Wojcik

Pope favors business practices that place human beings ‘at the center of economic life’

MADISON While most Americans gave an overwhelmingly warm reception to Pope Francis and his open sense of kindness, compassion and humility during his recent visit, a few took the opportunity of his historic trip to blast what they perceive as his pointed criticism of capitalism.

But the fact is that the Pope has praised business as a “noble vocation,” while disapproving of business practices — regardless of the economic system — that place the pursuit of profit over the needs of people, especially the poor, said Philip Brach of The Catholic University of America, Washington, who spoke Oct. 1 on “Catholicism Speaks to Capitalism” at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley- Ellard here.

“Greed is not unique to anyone economic system but rather a condition of the fallen human condition. There are greedy lawyers and doctors and greedy capitalists and socialists,” said Brach, assistant dean of the School of Business and Economics. “The very survival of our free market economic system will rest on those business leaders who understand why and how to put the human person at the center of economic life,” he told his audience.

Pope Francis speaks out against the excesses of business in general, including greed and the idolatry of money, consumerism, the exclusion of the poor and marginalized and the misuse of technology. So the pontiff offers the remedy for these ills: Catholic social teaching, which promotes the common good, human dignity, subsidiary and solidarity, Brach said.

Pope Francis hopes to get people in business to think seriously about corporate social responsibility. “Money must serve, not rule!” (as he writes in apostolic exhortation, Evangelii Gaudium), because people are much more important then capital: machinery, equipment, buildings and cash. In his encyclical Laudato Si’, the Holy Father states, “The principle of the maximization of profits … reflects a misunderstanding of the very concept of the economy,” said Brach.

Pope Francis blasts consumerism as a disordered belief that material goods can bring us true happiness. In Laudato Si’, he writes, “This same ‘use-and-throw-away’ logic generates so much waste, because of the disordered desire to consume more than what is really necessary.” Instead, the pontiff calls on us to simplify our lives, he said.

“It is not about having or not having nice things, but rather our relationship with material goods — do we use our goods primarily in the service to our family and others?” said Brach, a married father of eight with another child “on the way.”

Economic activity does have the potential of raising the living standards of all participants, but many are excluded from participation, because of the “laws of competition and survival of the fittest, where the powerful feed upon the powerless.” So “masses of people find themselves excluded and marginalized, without work, without possibilities, without means of escape, the Pope writes in Evangelii Gaudium, Brach said.

Pope Francis states that we often over-value technological progress no matter how it impacts the common good by replacing workers with machines, even at times of high unemployment, and practicing what he calls “technological absolutism:” the idea that man and science alone can cure all of society’s ills.

Instead, businesses rooted in Catholic social teaching places the human person at the center of economic life by promoting the following principles:

• Common Good: “The sum total of conditions of social living, whereby persons are enabled more fully and readily to achieve their own perfection,” as St. Pope John XXIII wrote in “Mater et Magistra.”

• Human Dignity: The realization that all human persons are made in the image and likeness of God, which leads people to apply this principle, not only to beginning and end-of-life issues, but also issues of human dignity, such as arguments for a just wage.

• Subsidiary: The concept that declares that matters in society should be dealt with a the lowest and most appropriate levels of authority and asserts the “preeminence of the family.”

• Solidarity: Unity arising from fraternal charity.

Pope Francis, he said, urges people to discover more profound solutions in “striving for a deep and profound conversion”— an “ecological conversion — a keen awareness of the good of creation rooted in our understanding of how it mediates our relationship with God the creator, a conversion towards Christ and finally a profound and deeper conversion to his presence in the Eucharist,” Brach said.

During a question-and-answer session after, a few questions centered around the Pope’s supposed views on distribution of wealth. Brach answered, “The Pope may not understand free-markets as much as he should but he challenges us to more [for society’s benefit]. To whom much is given, much is expected.”

“We thank Professor Brach for giving his time and attention to presenting us with a beautiful and clear summary of the [Church’s and Pope Francis’ views on] the economy. It was very helpful,” said Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization, after Brach’s presentation.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/%E2%80%98Catholicism+Speaks+To+Capitalism%E2%80%99/2290272/275803/article.html.

Appeal Helps The Poor In Passaic, Morris And Sussex Counties

Cecile San Agustin

PATERSON With Pope Francis visiting clients of Catholic Charities in Washington, D.C. and Catholic Charities in New York City, he made a point to the world of the importance of remembering the poor and recognizing the agencies that serve those most in need.

In his speech while visiting Catholic Charities in Washington, Pope Francis said, “The Son of God came into this world as a homeless person. The Son of God knew what it was to start life without a roof over his head. We can imagine what Joseph must have been thinking. How is it that the Son of God has no home? Why are we homeless, why don’t we have housing? These are questions which many of you may ask, and do ask, every day. Like St. Joseph, you may ask: ‘Why are we homeless, without a place to live?’ And those of us who do have a home, a roof over our heads, would also do well to ask: ‘Why do these, our brothers and sisters, have no place to live? Why are these brothers and sisters of ours homeless?’ Joseph’s questions are timely even today; they accompany all those who throughout history have been, and are, homeless.”

The work of the Paterson Diocese’s Catholic Charities agency, Catholic Family and Community Services (CFCS), here reflects the words of Pope Francis during his United States visit about care and concern for the poor and underprivileged whether they be immigrants from a foreign land in Passaic County, an elderly grandmother in Morris County or a disabled adult in Sussex County.

Every year, thousands and thousands of people in need turn to CFCS because they are at risk of losing their homes, in need of food or clothing or because of some other emergency, such as needing assistance with medical and utility bills. Last year, more than 70,000 people were served by the agencies of Catholic Charities in the Paterson Diocese.

Through the 2015 Bishop’s Annual Appeal, the faithful across the diocese can follow in Pope Francis’ footsteps and remember those most in need by “Serving Christ Among Us,” this year’s Appeal theme.

Diane Silbernagel, executive director of CFCS, said, “We were thrilled to see Pope Francis visit a Catholic Charities agency during his visit to the United States. So often, people aren’t aware of the scope of services and volume of work we do in so many communities. The Pope made us visible and he helped show the world what we do to serve not just Catholics but all people in need.”

CFCS is comprised of the Hispanic Information Center in Passaic, Hope House in Dover, the Partnership for Social Service Family Center in Franklin and the Father English Center here. It has more than 40 locations throughout Passaic Morris and Sussex counties.

Joe Duffy, president of diocesan Catholic Charities and executive director of Straight and Narrow, recalls the story of a couple in their late 50s living in an old house in Sussex County who was referred by their pastor to CFCS. “The husband was on Social Security disability and the wife, though disabled, has so far been denied disability and worked when she could. It was a situation where they could not afford to live in their home but could not afford to move,” said Duffy.

Through Bishop’s Annual Appeal contributions, CFCS was able to help repair the couple’s roof, replace their refrigerator and stock it and also fix their air conditioner. In addition, donations helped fix the couple’s car so the wife could take both her and her husband to doctor’s appointments and go out on job interviews.

Duffy said, “We could not have helped this family and the hundreds of other elderly and disabled clients across Passaic, Morris and Sussex counties without Bishop’s Annual Appeal money.”

Donations to the Bishop’s Annual Appeal are vital to keep many programs running. Silbernagel said, “Especially in Morris and Sussex counties, the Appeal fills in the gaps, which government funding does not. We really rely on the help. We have continued to see our numbers increase especially for those families requiring emergency services and it is expected to continue to grow.

CFCS runs a variety of programs to fulfill the many needs of the community. These include early childhood programs in four locations, youth at risk programs, behavioral health services for children, teens and families, services to several vulnerable populations, legal services and senior services in all three counties.

In addition to all diocesan Catholic Charities including Straight and Narrow and Department of Persons with Disabilities, the 2015 BAA will support seminarian education, retired diocesan priests living at Nazareth Village and inner city Catholic school students.

To donate to the Appeal, parishioners can provide financial support through one-time gifts or pledge paid over several months, credit card contributions or online contributions.

Silbernagel said, “We don’t do this work alone. The community continues to be extremely giving and that is especially evident during the holidays. Parish communities provide almost 10,000 Christmas gifts to families and more than 65 percent of our food pantry donations come from parishes. We are grateful to anyone who will give to the Appeal. We know our work isn’t anything anyone can do alone.”

[To make a donation online, go to www.2015appeal.org or call (973) 777-8818, ext. 218 for information.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Appeal+Helps+The+Poor+In+Passaic%2C+Morris+And+Sussex+Counties/2290275/275803/article.html.

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