Background Image

The Beacon The Beacon October 1 2015.pdf : Page 1

4 FL A NDER S P A RI S H BEGIN S C ELEBR A TION OF IT S 30TH A NNIVER SA RY SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS OCTOBER 1, 2015 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard 22 2 TRI C OUNTY SC HOL A R S HIP FUND TO M A RK 34TH YE A R A T A NNU A L DINNER BOONTON PRIE S T I S A UTHOR OF NEW BOOK 12 13 14 15 VICAR OF CHRIST On his first stop in New York City, Pope Francis led an Evening Prayer Service (Vespers) at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, BEACON PHOTO | CECILE SAN AGUSTIN Diocesan faithful part of record number to attend papal Mass in Philadelphia Chancery staff watches Pope’s address to Congress Diocesan faithful inspired by uplifting theme of World Meeting of Families Madison parishioners produce banner for canonization of St. Junipero Serra The Pope at the U.N., the Ground Zero Memorial, Central Park, and Madison Square Garden 7 10 19 20-21 22 23-27 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH O BITUARIES V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS the mother church of the Archdiocese of New York Sept. 24. Several religious sisters serving in the Diocese of Paterson attended the service and were touched by the Pope’s homily, which mentioned the contributions religious sisters have made in the United States. New York was one of the stops made by the popular pontiff, who also visited Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia during his papal visit to the United States Sept. 22-27. 16-17 Diocesan faithful blessed to experience events led by Pope By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER Hundreds head to N.Y.C. to get glimpse of Pope Paterson Diocese at the service was Salesian Sister Guerline Joseph, who was one of the youngest religious sisters at the service. She serves as a theology teacher at Mary Help of Chris -tians High School in North Hale -don and attended with three oth-er sisters from her community. “I feel very privileged to be here to see and to hear the Pope. When I was a youth, I remember-ing seeing the Pope but the feel-ing was different. Now that I’m older I understand what this all means, especially because of my studies as a religious sister and serving the Church. It is more meaningful,” said Sister Guerline. “This whole week at Mary Help we followed his trip to Cuba and United States and the students have been really excited about his visit. This week, they studied about St. Junipero Serra, whom the Pope canonized in Washing -ton. Today, the students wore white and yellow to mark his speech to U.S. Congress, which they listened to during classes.” The evening prayer service was especially moving for Sister Guerline because Pope Francis ex-pressed his appreciation to reli-NEW YORK With New York City being a tunnel or bridge away from the Paterson Diocese, hun-dreds of diocesan faithful headed to the Big Apple Sept. 24-25 hop-ing to see Pope Francis as the popular pontiff made his way to three U.S. cities last week. Pope Francis, who has been called the People’s Pope through-out his visit to the United States, made his first stop in New York at St. Patrick’s Cathedral where he led evening prayer with bish-ops of New York, priests, religious sisters and laypeople. One religious sister from the gious women during his homily. “I wish to say ‘thank you,’ a big thank you and to tell you that I love you very much,” Pope Francis told the religious, which received a huge applause from the congregation and was a sig-nificant affirmation for their serv-ice to the Church. Pope Francis told them, “I know that many of you (religious sisters) are in the front lines in meeting the challenges of adapt-ing to an evolving pastoral land-scape. Whatever difficulties and trials you face, I ask you, like St. Peter, to be at peace and to re-spond to them as Christ did: he thanked the Father, took up his POPE IN N.Y.C on 5

Diocesan Faithful Blessed To Experience Events Led By Pope

Cecile San Agustin

Hundreds head to N.Y.C. to get glimpse of Pope

NEW YORK With New York City being a tunnel or bridge away from the Paterson Diocese, hundreds of diocesan faithful headed to the Big Apple Sept. 24-25 hoping to see Pope Francis as the popular pontiff made his way to three U.S. cities last week.

Pope Francis, who has been called the People’s Pope throughout his visit to the United States, made his first stop in New York at St. Patrick’s Cathedral where he led evening prayer with bishops of New York, priests, religious sisters and laypeople.

One religious sister from the Paterson Diocese at the service was Salesian Sister Guerline Joseph, who was one of the youngest religious sisters at the service. She serves as a theology teacher at Mary Help of Christians High School in North Hale - don and attended with three other sisters from her community.

“I feel very privileged to be here to see and to hear the Pope.When I was a youth, I remembering seeing the Pope but the feeling was different. Now that I’m older I understand what this all means, especially because of my studies as a religious sister and serving the Church. It is more meaningful,” said Sister Guerline.“This whole week at Mary Help we followed his trip to Cuba and United States and the students have been really excited about his visit. This week, they studied about St. Junipero Serra, whom the Pope canonized in Washing - ton. Today, the students wore white and yellow to mark his speech to U.S. Congress, which they listened to during classes.”

The evening prayer service was especially moving for Sister Guerline because Pope Francis expressed his appreciation to religious women during his homily.“I wish to say ‘thank you,’ a big thank you and to tell you that I love you very much,” Pope Francis told the religious, which received a huge applause from the congregation and was a significant affirmation for their service to the Church.

Pope Francis told them, “I know that many of you (religious sisters) are in the front lines in meeting the challenges of adapting to an evolving pastoral landscape.Whatever difficulties and trials you face, I ask you, like St. Peter, to be at peace and to respond to them as Christ did: he thanked the Father, took up his cross and looked forward.”

For Franciscan Sister of Peace Ellen Byrnes, pastoral associate at St. Joseph Parish in Lincoln Park, Pope Francis’ words to religious sisters were inspiring. “I was moved to tears so often,” she said. “Even as he was headed via motorcade through 5th Avenue we could see on the screens he was coming, I was getting more and more choked up. In his homily, he made us all feel welcomed and that all is right and he sees the goodness of sisters. He talked about the past century in which sisters built schools, hospitals and universities and that today, we serve parishes, immigrants and many are extending themselves in prison ministry. Even though the work of sisters is changing, sisters are still doing the work and spreading the Gospel.”

One layperson at the evening service was Jean Henry, a parishioner of Notre Dame of Mount Carmel in Cedar Knolls.Henry attended the service with her longtime friend, Marie Liddy, a parishioner at St. Aloysius Church in Caldwell who works at Relevant Radio 1430 AM. “It is overwhelming to be here because I never thought this could happen to me,” Henry said, “I feel a sense of peace being in this beautiful cathedral and I think about ‘how could you not love this pope?’ He truly is a pastor and he speaks from the heart and his words touch my heart.”

The following day the Pope visited several other locations in New York including the United Nations where he addressed the general assembly — the fourth pontiff to speak to leaders of all nations. His speech focused on many issues facing the world today — climate change, immigration, human dignity and concern for the poor.

Pope Francis then led a multi-religious service at the Ground Zero Memorial where he prayed at the site where nearly 3,000 men, women and children that were killed during the attacks in 2001.

Father Daniel Murphy, pastor of St. Matthew Parish in Randolph, attended the service at the 9/11 memorial. His brother Edward Murphy was killed during the attacks on that day while he was working as an employee at Cantor Fitzgerald. The day of the service at the memorial— Sept. 25 — was Father Murphy’s brother’s birthday.

“I will admit I was glued to the TV to witness the incredible journey of our Holy Father to the U.S. His message and persona have truly inspired and challenged us all,” said Father Murphy. “I do believe that his talk at the Interfaith Prayer service at the 9/11 site was the most moving and most important for me personally due to my own connection through my brother but also due to the fact that it is hatred and division over religion that caused the terror of 9/11 and continues to be a major source of conflict in our world today.”

During his speech inside the 9/11 museum, the Pope said, “For all the differences and disagreements, we can live in a world of peace. We can and must build unity on the basis of our diversity of languages, cultures and religions and lift our voices against everything which would stand in the way of such unity. Together we are called to say, ‘no’ to every attempt to impose uniformity and ‘yes’ that diversity be accepted. Such unity can only happen if we uproot from our hearts all feelings of hatred, vengeance and resentment.”

Father Murphy viewed and listened to the service outside, which was poignant because the screen was just before the North Tower pool where he his brother’s name is inscribed with the other victims.

In addition to Pope Francis’ words, Father Murphy was also touched by the young Iman Khalid Latif, a chaplain at NYU, who said, “Through our knowing each other today, let us move beyond a mere toleration of our differences and work towards a much needed celebration of them.”

Father Murphy said, “I really do believe the words of Pope Francis at the memorial and the interfaith service were the most important of his visit because they spoke directly to the greatest fear and concern of so many in our world today: the violence caused by narrow and fundamentalist view of religion. The horror of 9/11 is proof of the darkness that overshadows our world when we as a human family fail to try to understand one another and respect the ways people come to God.”

In the afternoon, Pope Francis visited Our Lady Queen of Angels School in Harlem followed by a motorcade through Central Park where he greeted 80,000 faithful who waited for hours just for a short glimpse of the Pope.

Connie Ignacio, a parishioner of St. Andrew the Apostle in Clifton, said, “The feeling of seeing the Pope is indescribable.Even though we waited so long it was worth it. Something that made the experience even more amazing is that we saw a rainbow in the sky just before he came. It didn’t rain. So it almost felt like a miracle or sign from God. Pope Francis is very charismatic and he is for the poor. I believe he will bring so many people back to the Church.”

Also at Central Park was Israel Romero, a parishioner of St. Anthony Parish in Passaic, who was one of the hundreds of thousands of people, who used his phone to capture the moment when Pope Francis in the popemobile passed him by through the park. “It was really special to see him. I keep looking at the video I took because I still can’t believe I saw him. He truly is the people’s Pope.”

The highlight of the Pope’s trip in New York was a Mass at Madison Square Garden with more than 20,000 in attendance. The Mass was celebrated in Latin, Spanish and English with the Prayers of the Faithful offered in several languages reflecting the diverse Catholic community in New York and surrounding areas.

Known as the world’s most famous arena, Madison Square Garden holds special memories for Allan Wright, academic dean of St. Paul’s Inside the Walls, which now includes attending a Papal Mass.“Growing up a N.Y. Rangers fan, I have fond memories of going to MSG with my dad and my older brother,” he said. “I was told by the Missionaries of Charity that they had an extra ticket to see Pope Francis and would I like to have it? I think I shouted at the top of my voice, ‘yes’! Thank you, thank you, thank you!”

Listening to the Pope’s homily, Wright said, “It was a moving experience to gather as Church and to have our Holy Father preside was extraordinary. What struck me about his homily was when he said, ‘God’s faithful people can see, discern and contemplate his living presence in the midst of life, in the midst of the city.” Living in the Northeast is different than living in the midwest or down south. We are so ‘noisy and busy’ and pressed for time. Yet how true the Holy Father’s words especially for those involved directly in evangelization. Even in the midst of the noise and pressures and ‘darkness’ those of faith do have the light of Christ to illuminate the way and to let that light, Jesus, be a light for others.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Diocesan+Faithful+Blessed+To+Experience+Events+Led+By+Pope/2283738/274947/article.html.

Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here