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The Beacon The Beacon September 3, 2015 : Page 1

16 PRIEST’S GIFTS OF SOCCER BALLS BRINGS SMILES TO KIDS IN KENYA SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. MORRIS SEPTEMBER 3, 2015 18 3 4 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Newer religious gather with Bishop for annual Mass, dialogue, picnic By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER POPE FRANCIS SOCIETY GATHERS FOOD FOR THE POOR IN RETIREMENT, FATHER CATOIR USES SOCIAL MEDIA TO ENHANCE ST. JUDE MINISTRY 6-7 14-15 17 18 19-24 Y OUTH V IEWPOINT O BITUARIES W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS MENDHAM As summer unofficial-ly winds down, the newer religious of the diocese took advantage of the pleasant weather Aug. 27 to gather together with Bishop Serratelli for the celebration of Mass, followed by a dialogue and discussion, an out-door picnic and lawn games at the Quellen Center on the property of the motherhouse of the Sisters of Christian Charity here. The diocesan Office of Consecrated Life coordi-nated the annual event. Under beautiful summer skies, nearly 100 women and men from more than a dozen religious orders, who are in the early formation stages through five years after first profession, enjoyed the opportunity to spend time together to reflect on their vocations to religious life. This year was especially profound since Pope Francis designated 2015 as the Year of Consecrated Life. With the theme, “Wake Up the World!,” the readings and hymns at Mass reflect-Commitment to Consecrated Life ed that message for the religious. In his homily, Bishop Serratelli said, “We are not the masters of what we have. Everything is a gift from God. Jesus reminds us he is the Master and we are the servants.” Following Mass, the newer reli-gious gathered at St. Joseph’s Hall in the Quellen Center. Sister of Christian Charity Mary Edward Sphorer, who previously served for 10 years as diocesan chancellor and delegate for religious, and now is serving as her order’s provincial su-perior, welcomed the young reli-gious. “We welcome you all to our motherhouse,” she said. “This gath-ering is just another expression of Bishop Serratelli’s strong commit-ment to consecrated life and voca-tions in the Diiocese of Paterson.” NEWER RELIGIOUS on 12 WATCH THE BIRDIE Franciscan Sister of St. Elizabeth Yumita Jebia plays BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI badminton during the newer religious gathering. Nearly 100 new religious came to the Quellen Center on the property of the Sisters of Christian Charity’s Motherhouse in Mendham Aug. 27 for Mass with Bishop Serratelli, dialogue, a barbecue and lawn games. DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS MCHS president evangelizes across spectrum of digital media By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR ‘One-man media mogul’ cial media, to offer advice on ca-reers, technology, productivity, par-enting, spirituality and personal ful-fillment. St. Pierre, a parishioner of St. Vincent de Paul, Stirling, also re-cently published a book in electronic form — called an “e-book” — titled “The Six Fastest Ways to Super -charge Your Career.” Access to all his media can be found at his web-site, www.mikestpierre.com, which lists its target audience on its home-page: “rising leaders in the biz, ed and the Church.” “I present information that is practical, down to Earth and ever-green. It’s meant to be uplifting,” ident of Morris Catholic High School here, harnesses the “razzle dazzle” of various types of digital media — the power of technology to attract a diverse audience in new and ex-citing ways — in the service of a simple mission: to connect with peo-ple, especially leaders in education, business and the Catholic faith, and encourage, inspire and evangelize them. This local one-man media mogul exploits the possibilities of a many types of digital media, including a blog, podcasts, a newsletter and so-DENVILLE Michael St. Pierre, pres-said St. Pierre, a married father of four, who has been pursuing a doc-torate at the College of St. Elizabeth, Convent Station. “The material is 70 percent advice and 30 percent faith. I often speak about these various topics from a faith perspective. It’s a form of evangelizing, because it integrates faith and weaves those values into the discussion. I try to ‘speak as to edify,’ as Scripture says,” he said. St. Pierre’s digital log, or “blog,” “The Daily Saint,” has been consis-tently ranked among the top pro-ductivity blogs on the Internet. He offers practical advice to emerging leaders in a number of areas, gath-ering from his own experience and the insights of other experts in a spectrum of fields. In one post, “Don’t Expect to be Understood as a Leader,” he writes about Father Thomas Judge, a priest of the 1920s, whom many bishops disliked so much that they “banished him to the sticks of Alabama.” That’s be-cause the priest advocated radical ideas for the time, like going to church more often and having lay people visit the sick and sharing the faith with them, St. Pierre writes. “While misunderstood, I’d say that Father Judge’s leadership paid off,” St. Pierre writes. “Don’t expect to be understood as a leader. Some will get you and others will leave. MEDIA MOGUL on 2

Newer Religious Gather With Bishop For Annual Mass, Dialogue, Picnic

Cecile San Agustin

Commitment to Consecrated Life

MENDHAM As summer unofficially winds down, the newer religious of the diocese took advantage of the pleasant weather Aug. 27 to gather together with Bishop Serratelli for the celebration of Mass, followed by a dialogue and discussion, an outdoor picnic and lawn games at the Quellen Center on the property of the motherhouse of the Sisters of Christian Charity here. The diocesan Office of Consecrated Life coordinated the annual event.

Under beautiful summer skies, nearly 100 women and men from more than a dozen religious orders, who are in the early formation stages through five years after first profession, enjoyed the opportunity to spend time together to reflect on their vocations to religious life. This year was especially profound since Pope Francis designated 2015 as the Year of Consecrated Life. With the theme, “Wake Up the World!,” the readings and hymns at Mass reflected that message for the religious.

In his homily, Bishop Serratelli said, “We are not the masters of what we have. Everything is a gift from God. Jesus reminds us he is the Master and we are the servants.”

Following Mass, the newer religious gathered at St. Joseph’s Hall in the Quellen Center. Sister of Christian Charity Mary Edward Sphorer, who previously served for 10 years as diocesan chancellor and delegate for religious, and now is serving as her order’s provincial superior, welcomed the young religious.

“We welcome you all to our motherhouse,” she said. “This gathering is just another expression of Bishop Serratelli’s strong commitment to consecrated life and vocations in the Diiocese of Paterson.”

In his teaching, the Bishop spoke to the religious about their courage and commitment to stand up during a time when religion does not seem to matter to many.

He said to them, “By the fact you are religious, you are saying Jesus comes first and that religion does matter.”

The Bishop shared statistics about Christian religions, many of which are facing the lowest attendance in services in recent decades. He spoke about the recent ruling made by the U.S. Supreme Court on samesex marriage, the news about Planned Parenthood and the lack of care for the elderly.

Through all this, the Bishop said, “No matter what the difficulty that we face, we need to place our hope and trust in God. Are we willing to face our culture with faith? With the truth? Are we ready to accompany others to Jesus? This is the purpose of our religious life.”

After the Bishop’s teaching, the young religious, who serve in the diocese or are studying at Assumption College for Sisters in Denville, had group discussions on the challenges and the gift of their vocation.

In her small group, Salesian Sister Guerline Joseph, a fourth-year junior professed and teacher at Mary Help of Christians Academy in North Haledon, shared the importance of family in such a broken world. “Families are even becoming more individualistic rather than a community in a way. I believe the family is the root of how the world is today. It’s important that children come from good, well grounded families,” she said.

Speaking on the microphone to share with the entire group, Little Sister of the Poor Mercy Mary, who serves at St. Joseph’s Home for the Elderly in Totowa and recently made her temporary vows, spoke about how many young religious meet people that are confused about their vocation. “At first many including people in our families didn’t understand our vocations, they thought we were moving to an institution,” she said. “But a religious vocation is an encounter with the Risen Christ and growing stronger in our relationship with him. We want to show the world who Jesus is and his sacrifice and that this is love to the fullest.”

Trinitarian Brother Dieudonne Nsom Kindong, serving at the Shrine of St. Joseph in Stirling, asked the Bishop a question, “How can we bring the Gospel message to young people?”

The Bishop said, “Be with them and be present to them. It’s important you lead them to question. While it’s important they know what we believe, it’s more important for them to know why we believe.”

Also speaking with the larger group was Julianna Staab, a resident at Casa Guadalupe in Clifton, who is discerning her vocation. She recalled attending Catholic grammar school but never knowing who Jesus was until her time living on the campus of the University of Miami. “Young people are experiencing a real empti - ness and they want something real,” she said. “While so much is going on in the world, perhaps we are the generation of hope and renewal.”

After the discussion, the religious enjoyed a barbecue dinner and then played volleyball and badminton until sunset.

The Bishop said to the religious, “You share one important message to the world through your lives and that is that God cares intensely and passionately about each one of us in the world.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Newer+Religious+Gather+With+Bishop+For+Annual+Mass%2C+Dialogue%2C+Picnic/2260203/271449/article.html.

MCHS President Evangelizes Across Spectrum Of Digital Media

Michael Wojcik

‘One-man media mogul’

DENVILLE Michael St. Pierre, president of Morris Catholic High School here, harnesses the “razzle dazzle” of various types of digital media — the power of technology to attract a diverse audience in new and exciting ways — in the service of a simple mission: to connect with people, especially leaders in education, business and the Catholic faith, and encourage, inspire and evangelize them.

This local one-man media mogul exploits the possibilities of a many types of digital media, including a blog, podcasts, a newsletter and social media, to offer advice on careers, technology, productivity, parenting, spirituality and personal fulfillment. St. Pierre, a parishioner of St. Vincent de Paul, Stirling, also recently published a book in electronic form — called an “e-book” — titled “The Six Fastest Ways to Super - charge Your Career.” Access to all his media can be found at his website, www.mikestpierre.com, which lists its target audience on its homepage: “rising leaders in the biz, ed and the Church.”

“I present information that is practical, down to Earth and evergreen. It’s meant to be uplifting,” said St. Pierre, a married father of four, who has been pursuing a doctorate at the College of St. Elizabeth, Convent Station. “The material is 70 percent advice and 30 percent faith. I often speak about these various topics from a faith perspective. It’s a form of evangelizing, because it integrates faith and weaves those values into the discussion. I try to ‘speak as to edify,’ as Scripture says,” he said.

St. Pierre’s digital log, or “blog,” “The Daily Saint,” has been consistently ranked among the top productivity blogs on the Internet. He offers practical advice to emerging leaders in a number of areas, gathering from his own experience and the insights of other experts in a spectrum of fields. In one post, “Don’t Expect to be Understood as a Leader,” he writes about Father Thomas Judge, a priest of the 1920s, whom many bishops disliked so much that they “banished him to the sticks of Alabama.” That’s because the priest advocated radical ideas for the time, like going to church more often and having lay people visit the sick and sharing the faith with them, St. Pierre writes.

“While misunderstood, I’d say that Father Judge’s leadership paid off,” St. Pierre writes. “Don’t expect to be understood as a leader. Some will get you and others will leave.

That’s OK— it means that you are standing for something,” he writes.

In a more recent blog post, St. Pierre writes about the way that he tried to heed the warnings of medical professionals about the health dangers of sitting all day at work by constructing a “standing desk,” where he can work standing up.

“I love it! It’s great being able to move, stretch and fidget while I work. It does take some getting used to but overall I’m really pleased,” writes St. Pierre, who blogs about other topics, including dressing for success, productivity, how to have a great day and parenting. His blog posts and news articles have appeared at LifeHack, an influential productivity blog; Catholic Exchange; and Catholic News Service.

St. Pierre also produces and hosts the following two podcasts: “Techspiration,” about how technology can help educators deliver curriculum, including to those in Catholic education, and “The Emergent Leader,” which delivers advice for up-and-coming leaders.

The media mogul’s guest host for “Techspiration” has been Nancy Carmonico, a consultant for Catholic schools and part of a team that has been organizing Pope Francis’ visit to Philadelphia this month. A few of the podcast’s guests have originated from as far at the Los Angeles Archdiocese and as close as the Paterson Diocese with Allan Wright, academic dean of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard, Madison. He uses many types of technology to spread the Gospel.

“I maximize my reach though tech,” said Wright, who encouraged parishes to build web sites with welcoming messages. “They [parish websites] should say, ‘You’ve been away for a while. No problem. We are glad that you’re coming back.’ Technology can help with welcoming, but evangelization must be embodied — with a handshake and a smile. It has to be personal — building relationships and being an authentic in our witness. Then, people will be curious about who we are,” he said.

That mission of witness deepened even more several months ago, when St. Pierre started a newsletter that he emails to subscribers every Sunday. He targets “rising leaders, who want to expand their influence” with inspirational insights. Interested people can sign up for the newsletter and his e-book at St. Pierre’s web site, he said.

On a recent past Sunday, St. Pierre wrote about how people can discover their inner calm in the midst of their hectic lives. He quoted St. Francis de Sales: “Do not lose your inner peace for anything whatsoever.” He suggested “driving more slowly, reading more slowly, listening more attentively and praying more patiently” and also “savoring very minute of it [life] without hurrying.”

“This is important because when we hurry, we miss things. We aren’t present to those that matter the most. We are also a little bit more likely not to give our very best since we’re thinking ahead instead of thinking in the present,” St. Pierre wrote.

Throughout the week, St. Pierre reaches an even greater diversity of people through social media, posting his own insights and stories — or those of other experts — on sites, such as Twitter and Facebook. He named as inspirations for starting this multi- media ministry his colleagues at Morris Catholic, where he has helped open up the possibilities of technology in the classroom.

St. Pierre has gained praise from leaders in technology, education, business and the Church. Among them has been Jared Dees, a best-selling author, from the website, The Religion Teacher, which “provides practical resources and teaching strategies to help religious educators transform the lives of the young people they teach,” it states.

“Mike St. Pierre is a dynamic leader and an inspiration to other Catholic school leaders across the country. With vision and clarity, he is able to guide aspiring leaders to efficiently live their full potential with practical tools and resources for experienced veterans or novice administrators,” Dees said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/MCHS+President+Evangelizes+Across+Spectrum+Of+Digital+Media/2260204/271449/article.html.

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