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The Beacon The Beacon August 20, 2015 : Page 1

SUSSEX 2 PROTE S T OF PL A NNED P A RENTHOOD S ET SA TURD A Y PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS AUGUST 20, 2015 10 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Bishop from new diocese in India visits area parish By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER B IRD ’ S E YE V IEW 4 5 BI S HOP M A KE S P AS TOR A L VI S IT TO R A NDOLPH P A RI S H C LIFTON P A RI S H WEL C OME S BI S HOP ON P AS TOR A L VI S IT 7 8-9 10 1 1-15 O BITUARIES V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS CLIFTON Bishop Peter Abir Antonysamy of Dio -cese of Sultanpet in Palakkad, India, has traveled thousands of miles from home to come to the Paterson Diocese to share the story about the faithful he leads in his new diocese, which is less than two years old. Pope Francis established the Diocese of Sultanpet on Dec. 28, 2013, part of Kerala, a southwest state in India, making it the 31st dio-cese in the region. Bishop Antonysamy was named by the Pope as the first bishop of the dio-cese that same day. For Bishop Antonysamy, who was ordained a priest in 1979, building the diocese has been an interesting and exciting challenge as he gets to know the flock he is shepherding. “I am learning a lot about the people in the region. I am from a different part of India so I’ve been learning the language of their state and about their hopes for the future,” he said. During his visit to the Paterson Diocese, Bishop Antonysamy went to St. Catherine of Bologna Parish in Ringwood and also had a meeting with Bishop Serratelli. INDIAN BISHOP on 2 Bishop Serratelli mounted the scaffolding surrounding the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Paterson to the roof line to check on the progress of the renovations to the exterior of the cathedral, which will be completed in the fall. Pointing out some of the remaining work to be done are Dennis Rodano, diocesan project manager, and Rebeca Ruiz-Ulloa, diocesan architect. DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS International Grief Council plans program at Villa Walsh By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER To share stories ‘from the darkness to the light’ Mayer, who has longtime ties to the Paterson Diocese previously living in Morris County for 40 years. Because of this mutual experi-ence, which has turned into mutual growing, the three women, who are mothers, daughters and authors, are coming together as a panel to share their individual journeys and how they use the gifts of grief to serve the world today. Calling themselves the Interna -tional Grief Council, the women will be hosting three events open to the public — at Georgian Court Uni -versity in Lakewood on Sept. 28, from 1 to 3 p.m.; at Villa Walsh Academy in Morristown on Sept. 30 from 1 to 3 p.m.; and at the Namaste Bookshop in New York City on Oct. 1 from 7 to 9 p.m. Mayer’s journey of grief began 11 years ago following the death of her mother. Then about a year later, her daughter, Cindy, suddenly passed away at 40. “My mother’s passing was diffi-cult because I never had that inti-mate relationship with her since she was very private and kept to herself. I never was able to reach her and that affected me after her death. MORRISTOWN From darkness to light best describes the journey of three women from three different parts of the globe. LoAnne Mayer, a Catholic from the United States, Uma Girish, a Hindu from India and Daniela Norris, a Jewish woman from Israel have never met until one common experience brought them together. “The three of us have had the mutual life experience of losing loved ones. The three of us have ex-perienced the other side of the dark-ness and somehow we have gotten out of it and into the light,” said When my daughter passed away, we were devastated. She left two won-derful boys and none of us were prepared for what was to come af-ter,” said Mayer. Overcome with grief, Mayer went on a pilgrimage to Israel visiting the holy sights. She thought about the Blessed Mother and the grief she faced following the loss of her Son, Jesus. “I remember asking Mary, ‘How did you do this?’ During my time of grief, I began to really think about the love of God, something I never really did before even though I am an active Catholic. I never thought about what happens be-yond, what happens when people GRIEF COUNCIL on 3

Bishop From New Diocese In India Visits Area Parish

Cecile San Agustin

CLIFTON Bishop Peter Abir Antonysamy of Dio - cese of Sultanpet in Palakkad, India, has traveled thousands of miles from home to come to the Paterson Diocese to share the story about the faithful he leads in his new diocese, which is less than two years old.

Pope Francis established the Diocese of Sultanpet on Dec. 28, 2013, part of Kerala, a southwest state in India, making it the 31st diocese in the region. Bishop Antonysamy was named by the Pope as the first bishop of the diocese that same day.

For Bishop Antonysamy, who was ordained a priest in 1979, building the diocese has been an interesting and exciting challenge as he gets to know the flock he is shepherding. “I am learning a lot about the people in the region. I am from a different part of India so I’ve been learning the language of their state and about their hopes for the future,” he said.

During his visit to the Paterson Diocese, Bishop Antonysamy went to St. Catherine of Bologna Parish in Ringwood and also had a meeting with Bishop Serratelli.

His episcopal motto gives insight to the Diocese of Sultanpet’s mission, “Broken to Build.” Bishop Antonysamy said, “We hope to uplift the life of the most vulnerable, the poorest, the disadvantaged and the neglected of the society.”

Father Pawel Szurek, administrator of St. Catherine’s, hosted the Indian bishop and said, “Bishop Peter is very passionate about what he is doing in this new diocese and he really wants great things for the people. He feels like the father of the diocese because he is its first leader. At St. Catherine’s, we are calling this mission ‘project motorcycle’ because the priests visit village to village on motorcycles. We are hoping we are able to raise money to buy a new one for them.”

In the region of the Sultanpet Diocese, there are about 1.7 million people made up of Hindus, Muslims and Christians. The new diocese was started to serve and to deepen the faith of the Catholics living in the area. About 31,600 people belong to the Roman Catholic Church.

Because the diocese is so young and has so many needs, Bishop Antonysamy has been visiting dioceses around the U.S. this summer bringing awareness of his diocese to the faithful here and seeking prayers and donations to help build up the infrastructure in his diocese.

“Our dream is to build new churches, retreat centers, provide equal opportunities to all the poor and orphan children and establish relief programs in times of disaster. Also, we plan on establishing disease-prevention and family encounter centers to spread health awareness and create better nutritious and environmental behavior among the people in the diocese,” Bishop Antonysamy said.

In his diocese, the bishop also hopes to create centers for job training for men and women so they can become more self-sufficient. Many of the people in Kerala are migrants seeking jobs. In general, people are often illiterate, unemployed and live in perennial poverty.

Another focus is ensuring the Catholic Church in Sultanpet is growing for years to come. Currently, there are 23 priests and 12 religious priests serving in the 21 parishes and 56 mission centers of Sultanpet. There are also 125 religious sisters involved in spiritual, education, evangelization, social and pastoral ministries of the diocese. The diocese also has 35 seminarians in formation.

There are also plans to train and educate future missionaries including priests, catechists and lay ministers for special mission services in the Church to follow the example of missionaries such as St. Francis Xavier, who spread the Catholic faith throughout India.

Bishop Antonysamy said, “In our missionary endeavor, it is very important, as St. John Paul II mentions in the context of the universal mission, that we need to be open to the needs of one another. As Catholics, each individual brings their own individual gifts to the other person and the whole. Together, each individual grows greater through the mutual communication of all and their united efforts towards fullness in unity and life.”

[Information, www.sultanpetdiocese.org.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Bishop+From+New+Diocese+In+India+Visits+Area+Parish/2246321/269727/article.html.

International Grief Council Plans Program At Villa Walsh

Cecile San Agustin

To share stories ‘from the darkness to the light’

MORRISTOWN From darkness to light best describes the journey of three women from three different parts of the globe. LoAnne Mayer, a Catholic from the United States, Uma Girish, a Hindu from India and Daniela Norris, a Jewish woman from Israel have never met until one common experience brought them together.

“The three of us have had the mutual life experience of losing loved ones. The three of us have experienced the other side of the darkness and somehow we have gotten out of it and into the light,” said Mayer, who has longtime ties to the Paterson Diocese previously living in Morris County for 40 years.

Because of this mutual experience, which has turned into mutual growing, the three women, who are mothers, daughters and authors, are coming together as a panel to share their individual journeys and how they use the gifts of grief to serve the world today.

Calling themselves the International Grief Council, the women will be hosting three events open to the public — at Georgian Court University in Lakewood on Sept. 28, from 1 to 3 p.m.; at Villa Walsh Academy in Morristown on Sept. 30 from 1 to 3 p.m.; and at the Namaste Bookshop in New York City on Oct. 1 from 7 to 9 p.m.

Mayer’s journey of grief began 11 years ago following the death of her mother. Then about a year later, her daughter, Cindy, suddenly passed away at 40.

“My mother’s passing was difficult because I never had that intimate relationship with her since she was very private and kept to herself. I never was able to reach her and that affected me after her death.

When my daughter passed away, we were devastated. She left two wonderful boys and none of us were prepared for what was to come after,” said Mayer.

Overcome with grief, Mayer went on a pilgrimage to Israel visiting the holy sights. She thought about the Blessed Mother and the grief she faced following the loss of her Son, Jesus. “I remember asking Mary, ‘How did you do this?’ During my time of grief, I began to really think about the love of God, something I never really did before even though I am an active Catholic. I never thought about what happens beyond, what happens when people die. I thought about my daughter and wondered, ‘Is she OK?’ I felt a peace when I thought about God’s whole extraordinary love.”

When she returned, from the pilgrimage, she attended church, grief counseling and did a lot of journaling. In 2012, she published “Celestial Conver sations.”

“Writing about it was really helpful,” she said. “I remember thinking at first, ‘If I survive this experience, there is no way I’m writing about this.’ But then someone said to me, ‘If you write about this, it will help heal you.’”

Through writing her book, Mayer met Girish, who also wrote about her grief following the death of her parents. Girish, who lives in Chicago, said, “My mother’s passing triggered my transformational journey and my father’s death reinforced in me the desire to live purposefully. To me, loss is a sacred doorway. When we face the pain and summon the courage to step through that door, we are changed forever. There are gifts of purpose and meaning waiting on the other side. But each of us get to choose: ‘Do I open and become more present to the pain or shut down in fear and stay trapped in my grief?’”

After Mayer and Girish met, they came in contact with Norris, who lost her younger brother suddenly while he was on vacation. Norris, who lives in Geneva, Switzerland, said, “It is only when we realize that death is not the end, do we begin to look at death, grief — and life — in a different way. Each one of us had lost, or will lose, someone close to them in their lifetime. This is a certainly. If we learn how to deal with death and loss, and to continue the love, friendship and appreciation between us and those we care about who moved on, then grief can help us turn a difficult and painful situation into an opportunity for learning and progress.”

With the three women coming from different backgrounds, they’ve learned a lot about how people grieve differently in different parts of the world. Mayer said, “In Europe, people talk about grief all the time. Americans tend not to talk about grief. It appears we are just not trained and very often, you would hear people say, ‘Get over it.’ It seems crazy to think, but this happens all the time.”

Mayer added, “Men experience grief in different ways and they are just as active. I remember when I was part of Compassionate Friends (a self-help group for bereaved parents at St. Christopher Parish in Parsip pany), the men would mostly listen, but they were also looking for ways to move forward.”

The council recommends anyone who works in bereaved ministries at churches and hospices or is experiencing grief or loneliness should come to the September events.

“If you are feeling stuck and alone,” Mayer said, “there is no need to be. Grief is not just one thing, it is many layers. We hope this council is the beginning of a conversation that needs to be started in many communities. People need to know there is hope. People have survived and grown.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/International+Grief+Council+Plans+Program+At+Villa+Walsh/2246327/269727/article.html.

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