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The Beacon The Beacon July 23, 2015 : Page 1

2 C LIFTON N A TIVE IN S T A LLED AS SA LE S I A N PROVIN C I A L SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS JULY 23, 2015 113-YEAR-OLD TRADITION 5 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Italian feast draws crowds to St. Michael Parish in Netcong By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER 3 IMM AC UL A TE C ON C EPTION P A RI S HIONER TO OPEN C HRI S TI A N RO C K C ON C ERT CA THOLI C C H A RITIE S A GEN C Y OPEN S REFURBI S HED THRIFT S HOP, FOOD P A NTRY IN FR A NKLIN 5 6-7 10-16 16 AND THE BAND PLAYED ON A trumpeter in the St. Cesario Band plays a tune as BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI 4 he marches in the procession for the Feast of St. Cesario to St. Michael Church in Netcong July 18 where Bishop Serratelli was the principal celebrant of a Mass honoring the Italian saint, a martyr for the faith. NETCONG In 1902, eight Italian im-migrants left their hometown of Cesa, a province north of Naples, Italy, to come to America. The men — Francesco, Raffaele and Cesario Puco, Antonio Ferriero, Domenco and Guiseppe Togno, Lugi and Giustino Esposito — settled in the bucolic area in and around Netcong in northwest Morris County, but they never forgot their roots back home by establishing the St. Cesario Society in honor of their hometown’s patron saint. Now more than 100 years later, the names of these men appear on a banner that is carried in a proces-sion for St. Cesario, an Italian mar-tyr, for the feast day celebration that is held every year at St. Michael Parish here. Bishop Serratelli celebrated a Mass in honor of St. Cesario in St. Michael’s Church at 8 a.m. on July 18, marking the 113th anniversary of the feast day celebration at the parish. It is scheduled every year on the second to last Saturday of July as a day of faith, food, fun, friend-ship, family and fireworks. It con-tinues to draw generation after gen-eration as grandchildren, great grandchildren and even great-great grandchildren filled the pews of St. Michael’s — some who traveled long distances to come back to the Netcong parish — to mark the feast of the Italian saint. Following the Mass, the cele-bration continued with a parade CONTINUED on 8 W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS O BITUARIES GARDEN OF HOPE: FATHER ENGLISH CENTER DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Once vacant ‘drug den’ lot in Paterson now sprouting harvest of fresh vegetables By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER PATERSON Main Street is the hub of urban life in this city. St. Joseph’s Hospital, bus stops, retail stores, car mechanics, restaurants, one of the city’s libraries, schools and even the Mother Church of the Diocese — the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist are found here. But city dwellers are gawking at a very rare site along Main Street — a vegetable garden cultivated by the Father English Community Center (FECC), an agency of dioce-san Catholic Charities, with the as-sistance of City Green, a non-profit organization dedicated to establish-ing urban farms and gardens in northern New Jersey. The garden is in what was a vacant lot across the street from 435 Main Street where FECC is located. The garden, named the Garden of Hope or in Spanish, Jardin de la Esperanza, is part of FECC People’s Choice Food Pantry, which provides food and groceries to thousands of families each year. With the garden, FECC can now provide fresh pro-duce for those clients. Sister of Charity Maureen Sullivan, grant writer for diocesan Catholic Charities’ Catholic Family and Community Services, is coordi-nator of the garden with the assis-tance of Carlos Roldan, director of the food pantry at FECC. Nancy Hirdt and Andy San Felippo from GARDEN PARTY Carlos Roldan, Nancy Hirdt and Sister of Charity Maureen BEACON PHOTO | CECILE SAN AGUSTIN Sullivan, members of the Father English Community Center’s garden team, stand behind the cornstalks growing in the center’s Main Street garden. Our Lady of the Magnificat Parish in Kinnelon are also part of FECC’s “garden team.” “Our overall vision of our com-munity garden is a space that pro-vides a green area where adults and children can connect with nature, learn to grow healthy food and har-vest produce for themselves and oth-er needy persons,” Sister Maureen said. “It will produce healthy food but will also bring people together and promotes gardening skills for GARDEN OF HOPE on 2

Italian Feast Draws Crowds To St. Michael Parish In Netcong

Cecile San Agustin

NETCONG In 1902, eight Italian immigrants left their hometown of Cesa, a province north of Naples, Italy, to come to America. The men — Francesco, Raffaele and Cesario Puco, Antonio Ferriero, Domenco and Guiseppe Togno, Lugi and Giustino Esposito — settled in the bucolic area in and around Netcong in northwest Morris County, but they never forgot their roots back home by establishing the St. Cesario Society in honor of their hometown’s patron saint.

Now more than 100 years later, the names of these men appear on a banner that is carried in a procession for St. Cesario, an Italian martyr, for the feast day celebration that is held every year at St. Michael Parish here.

Bishop Serratelli celebrated a Mass in honor of St. Cesario in St. Michael’s Church at 8 a.m. on July 18, marking the 113th anniversary of the feast day celebration at the parish. It is scheduled every year on the second to last Saturday of July as a day of faith, food, fun, friendship, family and fireworks. It continues to draw generation after generation as grandchildren, great grandchildren and even great-great grandchildren filled the pews of St. Michael’s — some who traveled long distances to come back to the Netcong parish — to mark the feast of the Italian saint.

Following the Mass, the celebration continued with a parade through the streets of Netcong, a town that welcomed many Italian immigrants during the early 1900s. The banner was carried with an image of St. Cesario by society members and was accompanied by a color guard and the American flag and an Italian band. As the parade went through town, people pinned donations on the streamers of the banner. After the parade, families gathered for a picnic and the celebration that continued into evening. Later in the evening there was a large fireworks display.

Lucille Togno, whose grandfather, Guiseppe Esposito, was a member of the society, said, “I have so many great memories about this feast day. I remember we girls wore our First Communion dresses and we would be in the parade for St. Cesario. It’s always nice to see this celebration continued with generations of families coming to it 100 years later.”

St. Cesario lived around 300 AD during a time when pagans were persecuting Christians. Cesario was a 19-year-old deacon studying for the priesthood. During a visit to Italy, he witnessed a pagan celebration of Apollo and he objected to the human sacrifice it involved and he took the place of a man with eight children, who was to be killed for being a Christian. He was imprisoned for two years, and then martyred. He was tied into a sack and thrown into the sea to drown at Pisco Montano, Terracina, Italy. Later his body was found incorrupt. After his death many miracles were attributed to him and he was canonized.

Father Adam Muda, pastor, said, “The St. Cesario Society of our parish helped build St. Michael’s. The whole Mass for this saint was very spiritual. Many people were happy the Bishop attended. They felt inspired by his homily which talked about the importance of family, Sunday Mass and how martyrdom exists more than ever.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Italian+Feast+Draws+Crowds+To+St.+Michael+Parish+In+Netcong/2225306/266793/article.html.

Once Vacant ‘Drug Den’ Lot In Paterson Now Sprouting Harvest Of Fresh Vegetables

Cecile San Agustin

PATERSON Main Street is the hub of urban life in this city. St. Joseph’s Hospital, bus stops, retail stores, car mechanics, restaurants, one of the city’s libraries, schools and even the Mother Church of the Diocese — the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist are found here.

But city dwellers are gawking at a very rare site along Main Street — a vegetable garden cultivated by the Father English Community Center (FECC), an agency of diocesan Catholic Charities, with the assistance of City Green, a non-profit organization dedicated to establishing urban farms and gardens in northern New Jersey. The garden is in what was a vacant lot across the street from 435 Main Street where FECC is located.

The garden, named the Garden of Hope or in Spanish, Jardin de la Esperanza, is part of FECC People’s Choice Food Pantry, which provides food and groceries to thousands of families each year. With the garden, FECC can now provide fresh produce for those clients.

Sister of Charity Maureen Sullivan, grant writer for diocesan Catholic Charities’ Catholic Family and Community Services, is coordinator of the garden with the assistance of Carlos Roldan, director of the food pantry at FECC. Nancy Hirdt and Andy San Felippo from Our Lady of the Magnificat Parish in Kinnelon are also part of FECC’s “garden team.”

“Our overall vision of our community garden is a space that provides a green area where adults and children can connect with nature, learn to grow healthy food and harvest produce for themselves and other needy persons,” Sister Maureen said. “It will produce healthy food but will also bring people together and promotes gardening skills for the urban dweller. It can also be a place with some quiet space to sit, read, talk or dream.”

The project was established in March and gardening began the first week in June once a fence was installed. The lot belonged to neighboring School 3 but was abandoned for security reasons. Because it is on busy Main Street, the fence was needed to secure the site when the volunteers aren’t working in it. Abandoned for years, the lot was a known haven for drug addicts and drug dealers.

With the garden now in place, many of the residents pass by it with a sense of pride and happiness to see the “drug den” is gone and replaced with something green and full of life. Currently, there are several different kinds of vegetables found in the garden with 12 plant beds, including three kinds of tomatoes and peppers, eggplant, lettuce, squash, cucumbers, kale, cilantro and basil. There are also a few stone benches and bushes attracting butterflies. What has caught the attention of many city-dwellers walking by the garden is the four-foot tall cornstalks.

“Soon they will be taller than me,” laughed Sister Maureen.

The success of the garden is possible because of the many volunteers, said Sister Maureen, as the garden team continues to reach out to more people interested in helping or giving donations. City Green gave a grant of $2,500, which was used entirely for the fence. Through the efforts of the garden team, they were able reach out to others for donations of tools, plants and monetary gifts.

“When we started working on the garden, many people in the community would stop by and ask us what was going on,” Hirdt said. “They almost seem intrigued that this was happening here on Main Street in the city of Paterson. It’s truly a garden for the people.

Besides providing food during the summer months, students at the FECC day care, summer school and teen programs and developmentally disabled program will be invited to take guided tours of the garden and to help weed and harvest when possible. FECC also hopes to show clients the possibilities of growing fresh produce in Paterson. They also plan on having a space for story time for children.

Although the garden is just in its first season, Sister Maureen already has plans to expand it since only a small percentage of space has been used in the lot. “We plan to add additional beds for more vegetables and flowers,” she said. “New members are being sought from local groups as gardening volunteers. We hope to plant a late summer crop to make up for the time lost in the early spring. Our goal is to make the garden an attractive and welcoming place.”

[To help the garden project, contact Sister of Charity Maureen Sullivan at FECC at (973) 881-0280, ext. 538.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Once+Vacant+%E2%80%98Drug+Den%E2%80%99+Lot+In+Paterson+Now+Sprouting+Harvest+Of+Fresh+Vegetables/2225309/266793/article.html.

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