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The Beacon The Beacon July 16 2015 : Page 1

TWO P A RI S HIONER S IN DIO C E S E H A VE A UTHORED BOOK S SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. 8 MORRIS JULY 16, 2015 ‘Q UO V ADIS ’ 12 5 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard A T RE S URRE C TION P A RI S H, YOUTH SA Y ‘YE S ’ TO S ERVING OTHER S BENEDI C T IN S TITUTE EXPLORE S C HUR C H’ S ME SSA GE OF SA LV A TION IN A RT, A R C HITE C TURE, MU S I C 5-6 11 12 13-14 15-20 Discernment retreat helps young men find a direction in their vocation BY MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR 7 Y OUTH O BITUARIES W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS NEWTON The soft notes of “Canon in D” by Pachelbel float up from an upright piano that sits in the corner of the recreation room at Sacred Heart Spirituality Center here. The mood changes, as 16-year-old Aldo Bangiola of Assumption Parish, Morristown, switches to playing the boun-cy standard “Heart and Soul,” rocking the jaunty bass line with his left hand. J.C. Castillo, also 16, of St. Anthony Parish, Passaic, sits next to him, following along. Bangiola and Castillo take a break filled with music, during the Dio cese’s annual Quo Vadis Dis cern -ment Days Retreat from July 8-10, which was filled to capacity. There, they joined 28 other local Catholic young men, from ages 15 to 25, who put their hearts and souls into asking God and themselves the ques-tion “Where am going with my life?” The diocesan Vocations Of -L UKE A GNEW fice organized the re-treat, where partici-pants explored God’s call — as a priest, religious, married person or single person — during a busy schedule of activities, which included daily Mass, prayer, talks on vocations and the priesthood by clergy and seminarians, a visit with Bishop Serratelli and time for fellowship and quiet re-flection. “At first, I wasn’t super excited about coming to Quo Vadis. The priesthood is not my vocation. I think that my talents could be better used else-where. But now that I’m here, I’m glad that I came,” said Bangiola, an usher and so-to-be lector BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI P RAISE B ETO G OD At St. Therese of Lisieux Church in Paterson, women clasp their hands and lift them up as they pray during the vigil Mass celebrated by Bishop Serratelli during his pastoral visit to the parish July 11. For more photos of the pastoral visit, please turn to page 10. “By knowing Jesus and his Church, you know the truth. Knowing the truth can lead you to a vocation — God’s truth.” Little Falls parishioner named State Deputy of N.J. Knights of Columbus By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER GOD’S CALL on 2 LITTLE FALLS When Bruce DeMolli joined the Our Lady of the Highway Knights of Columbus Council 3835, based at Our Lady of the Holy Angels Church here, it was the Catholic mens fraternity’s signature blue jacket that caught his attention. While volunteering one evening during the parish’s weekly Bingo, DeMolli saw a member wearing that distinctive jacket. “It all began from there. I asked (Knight) Ed Silbernagel where did you get that jacket? He told me about the knights and what they do for the country, community and the Catholic Church,” he said. That was in 1984, and in the more than 30 years since then, DeMolli has been an active member of his council. For his dedication to the Knights, he was installed as the N.J. Knights of Columbus State Deputy, becoming the state “CEO” of the Knights for the next two years in a ceremony held July 11 in St. Philip the Apostle Church in Clifton. DeMolli became a state officer 10 years ago when he was elected State Warden. In the State of New Jersey, five officers are elected from each of the five dioceses in the state and move their way up to State Deputy. Other officers elected for a two-year term with DeMolli were: State Secretary Robert Hatler, State Treasurer Vincent Pavormina, State Advocate James Stoever and State Warden Raymond Sands III. “The Knights of Columbus is an organization where all its members believe in the same thing,” DeMolli said. “Because of that we are able to reach a common goal for the common good.” KNIGHT on 7

‘Quo Vadis’

Michael Wojcik

Discernment retreat helps young men find a direction in their vocation

NEWTON The soft notes of “Canon in D” by Pachelbel float up from an upright piano that sits in the corner of the recreation room at Sacred Heart Spirituality Center here. The mood changes, as 16-year-old Aldo Bangiola of Assumption Parish, Morristown, switches to playing the bouncy standard “Heart and Soul,” rocking the jaunty bass line with his left hand. J.C. Castillo, also 16, of St. Anthony Parish, Passaic, sits next to him, following along.

Bangiola and Castillo take a break filled with music, during the Dio cese’s annual Quo Vadis Dis cern - ment Days Retreat from July 8-10, which was filled to capacity. There, they joined 28 other local Catholic young men, from ages 15 to 25, who put their hearts and souls into asking God and themselves the question “Where am going with my life?” The diocesan Vocations Of - fice organized the retreat, where participants explored God’s call — as a priest, religious, married person or single person — during a busy schedule of activities, which included daily Mass, prayer, talks on vocations and the priesthood by clergy and seminarians, a visit with Bishop Serratelli and time for fellowship and quiet reflection.

“At first, I wasn’t super excited about coming to Quo Vadis. The priesthood is not my vocation. I think that my talents could be better used elsewhere. But now that I’m here, I’m glad that I came,” said Bangiola, an usher and so-to-be lector at Assumption, who comes from a family that is active at their parish. He attended the retreat at the invitation of Msgr. John Hart, the pastor, who has told him that he would make a good priest. “This retreat has given me time to reflect on my relationship with God, especially in the summer, when it’s so busy and you don’t have time to sit down. Even though I don’t want to be a priest, I still want to give my life to God. It’s also good to be with a group of young men, who have the same faith as you and are not apologetic about it,” he said.

These young men of faith explored the theme of this year’s Quo Vadis, “Men of Truth,” by listening to a series of talks by a few members of the retreat team, which consisted of 14 priests and seminarians. Topics included: “Does Truth Exist?,” “What Is Truth?,” “Modern Men of Truth” and “Men of Integrity.” After each presentation, retreatants divided into small groups to discuss the topics, said Father Jared Brogan, administrator of St. Catherine of Siena Parish, Mountain Lakes, and assistant diocesan vocations director, who organized the retreat.

The young men at Quo Vadis — Latin for “Where are you going?” — discerned, while praying alone and by participating in Mass, Adoration, Liturgy of the Hours, the rosary and Reconciliation. On Thursday night, Bishop Serratelli visited the spirituality center — operated by the Salesian Sisters — to celebrate Mass, share dinner with them and then answer any of their questions about vocations in a special session.

During the retreat, participants also got time to socialize, often sparking friendly competition, and took in the bucolic beauty of the woodlands that surround the spirituality center. They hiked; played sports, such as soccer, basketball and volleyball; and enjoyed playing music on piano, organ, guitar and violin. All the while, they engaged in enlightening conversations. One night, the Knights of Columbus of St. Kateri Tekakwitha Parish, Sparta, hosted a cookout for participants.

“Attendance for this year’s Quo Vadis filled every opening we had, thanks to the Holy Spirit and our pastors, who have been supportive in identifying young men [to attend the overnight retreat], said Father Brogan. He noted that Quo Vadis already has borne fruit within the Diocese with five seminarians currently studying for priesthood, who previously attended the retreat, and two men on retreat this summer, who will enter seminary in the fall. “The retreat experience helps these young men recognize God’s presence in their lives and their call — a pull in the direction of marriage or the priesthood. This is a spiritual experience that will help them become the best Catholic men possible,” he said.

Another retreatant, 16-year-old Jesse Hilario of St. Philip the Apostle Parish, Clifton, was formed in the faith by his parents, Mayra and Raul, who take him and his six siblings to Mass weekly and lead them in saying the rosary and praying before meals. He previously was an altar server at St. Philip’s.

“I feel that I’m being called to the priesthood. I’ve been asking a lot of questions. The people here have answered most of them. The retreat has helped clear up any doubts. I’ve been talking to members of the retreat team, who have been kind and open and have so many different stories and personalities,” Hilario said. “This has been a great experience that has enabled me to get closer to Jesus, which every person needs. My relationship with him has gotten twice as good as it was before,” he said

Early in the retreat, Luke Agnew, a firstyear theology student at Mount St. Mary’s Seminary in Emmitsburg, Md., sought to help deepen the faith of retreatants by giving a talk that explored the question, “Does Truth Exist?” The 29-year-old parishioner of St. Michael’s, Netcong, converted to Catholicism from the Dutch Reformed Church when he was 20 while studying for a bachelor’s degree in elementary education at Penn State University in State College, Pa.

“The source of truth is God, the source of all creation, and comes to us through the incarnate word of Jesus Christ. Jesus referred to himself as ‘The Way, the Truth and the Life.’ By knowing Jesus and his Church, you know the truth. Knowing the truth can lead you to a vocation — God’s truth,” said Agnew, who discerned his vocation, in part, by asking: “Lord, help me to want what you want for me.” He was accepted as a diocesan seminarian last year. “This retreat benefited the priests and seminarians here, because we can get together in a time of fraternity. We also get to know the young men and share life with them. They are seeking direction in their lives and we are helping form and guide them,” he said.

[Information about vocations in the Paterson Diocese: the Vocations Office (973) 777-8818, ext. 711 or http://vocationspaterson.com.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/%E2%80%98Quo+Vadis%E2%80%99/2216554/265869/article.html.

Little Falls Parishioner Named State Deputy Of N.J. Knights Of Columbus

Cecile San Agustin

LITTLE FALLS When Bruce DeMolli joined the Our Lady of the Highway Knights of Columbus Council 3835, based at Our Lady of the Holy Angels Church here, it was the Catholic mens fraternity’s signature blue jacket that caught his attention.

While volunteering one evening during the parish’s weekly Bingo, DeMolli saw a member wearing that distinctive jacket. “It all began from there. I asked (Knight) Ed Silbernagel where did you get that jacket? He told me about the knights and what they do for the country, community and the Catholic Church,” he said.

That was in 1984, and in the more than 30 years since then, DeMolli has been an active member of his council. For his dedication to the Knights, he was installed as the N.J. Knights of Columbus State Deputy, becoming the state “CEO” of the Knights for the next two years in a ceremony held July 11 in St. Philip the Apostle Church in Clifton.

DeMolli became a state officer 10 years ago when he was elected State Warden. In the State of New Jersey, five officers are elected from each of the five dioceses in the state and move their way up to State Deputy. Other officers elected for a two-year term with DeMolli were: State Secretary Robert Hatler, State Treasurer Vincent Pavormina, State Advocate James Stoever and State Warden Raymond Sands III.

“The Knights of Columbus is an organization where all its members believe in the same thing,” DeMolli said. “Because of that we are able to reach a common goal for the common good.

According to DeMolli becoming State Deputy “was a shot in the dark.”

“I was floored when I was elected as State Warden 10 years ago,” he said. “I thought it was the last thing I would ever attain because I was always part of the team helping behind the scenes.”

Like many Knights around the country, DeMolli got involved with the organization’s many programs, which include supporting priests and seminarians, disaster relief and respecting life. He has been one of the many Knights marching during the annual March for Life against abortion in Washington, D.C. every January.

Originally from Clifton with St. Brendan’s as his home parish, DeMolli grew up in an active Catholic family. “I remember my parents were always involved and got me and my three sisters involved with serving our parish. We always helped out at Bingo, the parish carnival and the picnic,” said Demolli.

He was married his wife, Anna, more than 40 years ago in St. Brendan’s.

They have one adult daughter, Bree, and a sonin- law, Olando Brown and have two grandchildren, Tyler and Maya. DeMolli’s wife serves as director at diocesan Catholic Charities’ La Vida Childcare Centers I & II in Paterson.

DeMolli attributes his wife’s continual support as an important part of being a Knight. He said, “She loves it. I tell her, too, that it is her organization as well because the Knights are so family oriented. At our Knights’ Christmas party for families, I played Santa Claus for 25 years. It is an enjoyable time with all the Knights’ families together.”

“This has been exciting,” said his wife moments before the installation Mass began. “His dedication to the Knights of Columbus has been unflinching. His journey with the Knights of Columbus has been my journey and I feel proud to support him as he serves as State Deputy.”

As the new State Deputy, DeMolli will lead 330 councils and 60,000 Knights. The Paterson Diocese makes up about 50 of those councils with more than 8,000 Knights in Passaic, Sussex and Morris counties.

DeMolli’s goal as State Deputy is to grow the order around the State and the Paterson Diocese. He and his fellow state officers hope to recruit almost 2,500 more men and start 10 new councils. Within the next couple of months, two new councils will be formed in the diocese — one at St. Agnes Parish in Paterson and another at St. Matthew Parish in Randolph.

He also hopes to get more priests to join as members because he believes the support of priests is crucial. “They are our spiritual leaders and guides,” he said. “Without them and their cooperation, we couldn’t grow. In fact, it was a priest — Father Michael J. McGivney — who officially chartered the Knights of Columbus in 1882 in New Haven, Conn.”

While the fraternal organization began in the United States, the Knights of Columbus has 1.8 million members around the world making it truly a global organization, Councils have recently been started in South Korea, the Ukraine, Poland and Cuba adding to the 14 countries already with councils.

“We encourage men to join us and come on board,” DeMolli said. “This is a great program to become involved in. We also have the Columbiettes for women and the Squire and the Squire Rose program for teens. If anyone wants to serve their Church, community and country, this is an excellent organization to join.”

[Information: www.njkofc.org for a list of local councils.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Little+Falls+Parishioner+Named+State+Deputy+Of+N.J.+Knights+Of+Columbus/2216557/265869/article.html.

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