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The Beacon The Beacon June 11, 2015 : Page 1

12 ST. MONICA PARISHIONER SELECTED IN NFL DRAFT BY BALTIMORE RAVENS SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. MORRIS JUNE 1 1, 2015 16 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard F IRST C LASS S INCE 2009 Bishop Serratelli ordains 13 men to the permanent diaconate By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER 2-3 JUBILEE MASS IN NOTRE DAME CHURCH HONORS 29 PRIESTS 19 ST. PIUS X PARISHIONER FILMS DOCUMENTARY ‘BIKING 4 VOCATIONS’ 4-5-9 13-14 16 17-19 Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS PARSIPPANY Bishop Serratelli or-dained 13 men to the Order of Deacon June 5 in St. Peter the Apostle Church here, which was filled to capacity with many diocesan priests and deacons, the families and friends of the new pernament dea-cons, and the faithful of the Paterson Diocese. The 13 permanent deacons — William Aquino of Our Lady of Fatima Parish, Highland Lakes; Nicholas Ardito of Our Lady of the Mountain Parish, Long Valley; John Brandi of Assumption Parish, Morristown; William DeVizio of St. Lawrence the Martyr Parish, Chester; Dennis Gil of St. Francis de Sales Parish in McAfee section of Vernon; James Jones of Our Lady of the Mountain Parish, Long Valley; Vincent LoBello of Our Lady of Mercy Parish, Whippany; James McGovern of Our Lady of the Lake NEW DEACONS With Bishop Serratelli are the 13 permanent deacons he ordained June 5 in St. Peter the Apostle Church, BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Parsippany. Front row: William Aquino, Nicholas Ardito, John Brandi, James McGovern, Jim Rizos and German Vargas. Back row: Dennis Gil, James Jones, William DeVizio, Vincent LoBello, Jose Padron, Kevin McKeever and Elliot Stein. Parish, Sparta; Kevin McKeever of St. Simon the Apostle Parish, Green Pond; Jose Padron of St. Therese Parish, Succasunna; James Rizos of St. Mary Parish, Denville; Elliot Stein of Assumption Parish, Morristown; and German Vargas of the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, Paterson — bring a wide range of work and min-istry experience to the parishes and people they will serve. In his greeting, Bishop Serratelli said, “We gather with great joy as 13 men will be ordained to the di-aconate with service to the Church of Paterson. What a great gift, what a priceless treasure the Lord is giving us tonight. We know from the Acts of the Apostles, that as the Church grew in those first years, the Apostles called worthy men and handed on the gifts of the ministry to them and the gift of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit chose those first seven deacons, the Holy Spirit chose these 13 men for that same CONTINUED on 10 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS ‘F ROM H OLLYWOOD TO H OLY V OWS ’ Benedictine prioress, who gave Elvis his first movie kiss, tells how she followed God’s call By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR CONVENT STATION It’s amazing to realize that the lips of Mother Dolores Hart — in her younger days as a Hollywood actress — once gave singer Elvis Presley his very first on-screen kiss in the 1957 movie “Loving You.” What’s also amazing is that the lips of Mother Dolores, who today serves as prioress of the Bene -dictine Abbey of Regina Laudis in Connecticut, now speak the undeni-able truths of the Catholic Church that are bigger than any Hollywood fame — and, yes, even Elvis. She told her remarkable story of how she abandoned a star-studded ca-reer as a lead actress to follow God’s call to become a contempla-tive religious sister May 31 during a luncheon for the Legal Center for the Defense of Life at the Madison Hotel here. Mother Dolores credited her mother, Harriett Hicks, for making that extraordinary life pos-sible, thanks to her courageous pro-life “stance” early on. “My parents had to get married earlier than planned [because Mother Dolores’ mother was preg-nant with her]. My mother’s mother and stepfather told her, ‘I think that you should get a di-vorce and an abortion.’ My moth-er totally rejected that advice. She wrote a note to her mother, say-ing that she would not come back to her house unless she could bring her baby with her. Her mother accepted and paid for all the maternity expenses. It’s be-cause of my mother’s stance that I am alive and I exist,” said Mother Dolores, whose parents, including father, actor Bert Hicks, separated when she was 3 and eventually divorced. “That [story of her mother’s pregnancy] made me aware of what a crime it [abor-tion] is. I treasure my life and am grateful for everything that has happened to me. I was a pretty HOLY VOWS on 8

First Class Since 2009

Cecile San Agustin

Bishop Serratelli ordains 13 men to the permanent diaconate

PARSIPPANY Bishop Serratelli ordained 13 men to the Order of Deacon June 5 in St. Peter the Apostle Church here, which was filled to capacity with many diocesan priests and deacons, the families and friends of the new pernament deacons, and the faithful of the Paterson Diocese.

The 13 permanent deacons — William Aquino of Our Lady of Fatima Parish, Highland Lakes; Nicholas Ardito of Our Lady of the Mountain Parish, Long Valley; John Brandi of Assumption Parish, Morristown; William DeVizio of St. Lawrence the Martyr Parish, Chester; Dennis Gil of St. Francis de Sales Parish in McAfee section of Vernon; James Jones of Our Lady of the Mountain Parish, Long Valley; Vincent LoBello of Our Lady of Mercy Parish, Whippany; James McGovern of Our Lady of the Lake Parish, Sparta; Kevin McKeever of St. Simon the Apostle Parish, Green Pond; Jose Padron of St. Therese Parish, Succasunna; James Rizos of St. Mary Parish, Denville; Elliot Stein of Assumption Parish, Morristown; and German Vargas of the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, Paterson — bring a wide range of work and ministry experience to the parishes and people they will serve.

In his greeting, Bishop Serratelli said, “We gather with great joy as 13 men will be ordained to the diaconate with service to the Church of Paterson. What a great gift, what a priceless treasure the Lord is giving us tonight. We know from the Acts of the Apostles, that as the Church grew in those first years, the Apostles called worthy men and handed on the gifts of the ministry to them and the gift of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit chose those first seven deacons, the Holy Spirit chose these 13 men for that same order. For five years they have been preparing to enter the service of the Church and we thank them for accepting this call and we thank their wives and their families for supporting them.”

Bishop Serratelli was main celebrant and homilist for the Mass and presided over the Rite of Ordination. Concelebrants of the Mass included pastors of the candidates and priests from around the diocese. At the Mass, deacons assisted and many of the newly ordained deacons’ wives took part in the celebration as readers, gift bearers and servers.

In his homily, Bishop Serratelli said, “No matter what our talents are, the dedicated use of what we make of them for a noble purpose matters most. Our brothers who are about to be ordained have many talents that they are now putting to the service of the Church. God has called them to assist in the holy work of offering worthy service to God both in liturgy and in life — both in the sanctuary and the streets of our cities. The dedication required of them is the total gift of self.”

Bishop Serratelli outlined a deacon’s responsibilities — to help the bishop and his priests in the ministry of the Word, the altar and of charity. The deacons are to proclaim the Gospel, to prepare and dispense the Eucharist, to give instruction in holy doctrine, to prepare the Holy Sacrifice and to preside over baptisms, marriages, funerals and public prayer. A deacon also carries out acts of charity in the name of the bishop and pastor, he said.

“Firmly rooted and grounded in faith, you are to show yourselves beyond reproach before God and Man, as is proper for the ministers of Christ and the stewards of God mysteries,” he told the candidates. “Hold the mystery of faith with clear conscience, expressed by your actions the Word of God which your lips proclaim so that the Christian people brought to life by the spirit may be a pure offering accepted by God. Then on the last day when you go to meet the Lord you will be able to hear him say, ‘Well done, good and faithful servant enter into the joy of your Lord,’ ” the Bishop told the candidates.

At the conclusion of the Mass, Bishop Serratelli thanked all the people who have been instrumental in nurturing the vocations of the 13 deacons, including their parish communities and Immaculate Conception Seminary at Seton Hall University in South Orange, where the deacons studied. The Bishop also thanked the diocesan diaconate office and Msgr. Robert Diachek, who formerly served as director of deacons. He also thanked those priests who organized the ordination liturgy — Father Kevin Corcoran, vice chancellor and priest secretary to the Bishop; Msgr. Raymond Kupke, diocesan archivist and pastor of St. Anthony Church in Hawthorne; Msgr. Mark Condon, diocesan director of the Office of Worship and Spirituality; and Father Daniel O’Mullane, chaplain at Pope John XIII Regional High School in Sparta, who will begin his new assignment as parochial vicar at St. Pius X Parish in Montville, on June 29. The Bishop especially thanked the wives, telling them: “Behind every great man is a great woman. I assure you the days ahead in ministry will not be easy. There will certainly be a lot of challenges in living a full family life and the full ministry of the Church. But remember don’t be discouraged — the Holy Spirit has been given to you. God has called you and God will give you the grace to respond.”

This class of pernament deacons is the first to be ordained in the diocese since 2009. After review of the program at the direction of the Bishop, the pernament diaconate program was revised in 2010. The academic requirements of the program were incorporated into Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology’s Program for Diaconal Studies.

The 13 men ordained were the first group to complete the new program. All men received Certificates in Diaconal Studies and nine men, who had bachelor degrees, earned a Masters of Arts in Theology degree.

There are currently 130 permanent deacons serving 74 parishes in the Diocese. The first permanent deacons in the Diocese were ordained in 1974. Since then, about 330 men have been ordained to the permanent diaconate in the Diocese.

At the close of the Ordination Mass, Deacon Peter Cistaro, diocesan director of deacons, thanked the Bishop and said, “Thank you for ordaining our new deacons and for your commitment and support for the diaconate in the diocese.”

To the newly ordained permanent deacons, the Bishop said, “The Acts of Apostles says, as the Word of the Lord continues to spread, the number of disciples increases. That is your mandate. Bring the Word of God from the altar and out into the world. As deacons, immerse yourself in the world — in business, in the marketplace, and even in politics. Bridge the gap between the Church and the world and you will make the Word of God increase and the number of disciples even greater.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/First+Class+Since+2009/2029443/262010/article.html.

‘From Hollywood To Holy Vows’

Michael Wojcik

Benedictine prioress, who gave Elvis his first movie kiss, tells how she followed God’s call

CONVENT STATION It’s amazing to realize that the lips of Mother Dolores Hart — in her younger days as a Hollywood actress — once gave singer Elvis Presley his very first on-screen kiss in the 1957 movie “Loving You.”

What’s also amazing is that the lips of Mother Dolores, who today serves as prioress of the Benedictine Abbey of Regina Laudis in Connecticut, now speak the undeniable truths of the Catholic Church that are bigger than any Hollywood fame — and, yes, even Elvis. She told her remarkable story of how she abandoned a star-studded career as a lead actress to follow God’s call to become a contemplative religious sister May 31 during a luncheon for the Legal Center for the Defense of Life at the Madison Hotel here. Mother Dolores credited her mother, Harriett Hicks, for making that extraordinary life possible, thanks to her courageous prolife “stance” early on.

“My parents had to get married earlier than planned [because Mother Dolores’ mother was pregnant with her]. My mother’s mother and stepfather told her, ‘I think that you should get a divorce and an abortion.’ My mother totally rejected that advice. She wrote a note to her mother, saying that she would not come back to her house unless she could bring her baby with her. Her mother accepted and paid for all the maternity expenses. It’s because of my mother’s stance that I am alive and I exist,” said Mother Dolores, whose parents, including father, actor Bert Hicks, separated when she was 3 and eventually divorced. “That [story of her mother’s pregnancy] made me aware of what a crime it [abortion] is. I treasure my life and am grateful for everything that has happened to me. I was a pretty lucky kid,” said the religious sister, reviewing her incredible life.

Mother Dolores not only told stories about her adventures in “Tinseltown,” but also spoke the truth about Respect for Life — a reality that she has lived personally. She spoke about consoling her friend, famed actress Patricia Neal, who lived with the pain of having aborted a baby in the wake of an affair with the fellow actor Gary Cooper, who was married at the time. “We wept many times over that baby. Patricia said that the abortion was her one regret in life. If she could have done it again, she would have had that baby,” said Mother Dolores, who converted to Catholicism when she was 10.

But long before God called, Mother Dolores — born Dolores Hicks — dreamed of an acting career. While starring in college productions, she received a call from a representative of Paramount pictures, who offered her a screen test, which went well, and then offered her first movie role with Presley in “Loving You,” as a teen-ager. She admitted that she was not familiar with the young singer at the time.

“Elvis was nice. When I first met him, he took my hand and said, ‘How do you do, Miss Dolores?’ That’s a gentlemen’s way of addressing a lady,” said Mother Dolores, who recounted her story in her 2013 memoir, “The Ear of the Heart: An Actress’ Journey From Hollywood to Holy Vows,” and the 2011 Academy-Award nominated documentary, “God Is Bigger Than Elvis.”

“We shot the final scene with the kiss first. It was Elvis’ first kiss in Technicolor. It was my first kiss. It took four seconds and then ‘cut.’ We did it again and again. They had to put makeup on my ears, because I was blushing,” she told the audience, which responded with laughter.

Soon, Mother Dolores became an in-demand actress, starring in movies alongside legends, such as Anthony Quinn, Robert Wagner and Montgomery Cliff. Among the many films she appeared in were: with Presley in “King Creole” and also in “Where the Boys Are”; as St. Clare of Assisi in “St. Francis of Assisi”; and “Come Fly with Me,” her last role in 1963. That year, the 24-year-old took a one-way car ride to Regina Laudis, where she had visited and befriended Mother Placid Dempsey, and entered the Benedictine order. She professed her final vows in 1970.

“I didn’t know if I wanted this [a religious vocation], but I knew that God wanted me to do this,” Mother Dolores said.

By pursuing religious life, Mother Dolores bid farewell to Hollywood and also to a possible married life with her fiancé, Don Robinson, a Los Angeles architect. He responded to the news by saying, “I will stay with you in your decision.” She remained friends with Robinson, who never married and who visited her at Regina Laudis every year until his death in 2011.

Mother Dolores said that she left behind all the trappings of Hollywood success — including the fancy clothes, big mansions and fast cars — to seek the love of the Lord in a special way.

She called the act of abortion “a lack of love” and the result of when “fear takes over.”

“What’s important is the gift of love — what makes us be ourselves by who we love and how we love. Fear tells a woman, ‘I can’t do it [bare and care for a child].’ If men would stand up [to their responsibilities] and if women would believe [that they can be mothers], it would be heaven. But we are so far from that now,” said Mother Dolores, who promised that her Benedictines would pray for the efforts of the Morristown-based Legal Center for the Defense of Life.

Afterward, Andrew Schlafly, Legal Center for the Defense of Life president, called Mother Dolores’ talk “inspirational.” The center is a non-profit organization that provides legal services to protect human life, from conception to natural death, especially the life of the unborn baby in the womb.

“She made a choice to leave Hollywood and follow what God wanted her to do. Many of her co-stars have died [under tragic circumstances]. We can learn from that,” Schlafly said. “Mother Dolores gave us a perspective that we don’t hear everyday.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/%E2%80%98From+Hollywood+To+Holy+Vows%E2%80%99/2029454/262010/article.html.

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