Background Image

The Beacon The Beacon February 19 2015 : Page 1

8-9 BI S HOP I SS UE S LENTEN P AS TOR A L LETTER SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS FEBRUARY 19, 2015 D IOCESE M ARKS W ORLD D AY FOR C ONSECRATED L IFE Bishop thanks religious during prayer service 12 7 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard LENTEN RE C IPE S FROM A ROUND THE WORLD 16 FILIPPINI S A T HOLY S PIRIT P A RI S H HO S T EVENT FOR YE A R OF C ON S E C R A TED LIFE 4-5 10-1 1 12 13 14-15 Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS the intercession of Our Lady and the prayers and support of my institute to live these vows faith-fully,” participants recited together. Daytime CLIFTON Priests, brothers and sisters from many Prayer service was filled with hymns of praise to of the 45 religious institutes that serve the God by musicians and singers from religious com-Paterson Diocese gathered together Feb. 15 in St. munities and Catholic high school students. Philip the Apostle Church here to mark the dioce-Under the theme for the Year for Consecrated san celebration of World Day for Conse crated Life, “Wake Up The World,” this year’s prayer Life. service featured a reflection by Sister Ascenza On that afternoon, they looked back at the Tizzano, provincial superior of the Religious histories of their communities Teachers Filippini in Morristown. with gratitude; to the present “How privileged we are. Our with passion for their various call to consecrated life is recog-charisms; and to the future with nized and celebrated by the en-hope. tire Church. We thank Pope Bishop Serratelli presided over Francis for raising the dignity of the prayer service with Bene -our vocation. Every consecrated dictine Abbott Richard Cronin of person, he said, is a gift for the St. Mary’s Abbey, Morristown. people of God on this journey,” Filling the church were many re-Sister Ascenza said. “We are in-ligious, including priests, brothers vited to pause and to reflect, ‘For and sisters, as well as men and whom do I work?’ ‘In whose women in formation or still in service am I?’ and ‘Why am I discernment, lay associates and here?’ The answers to these diocesan priests and Chancery B ISHOP S ERRATELLI questions impact our everyday personnel, who came in support. and are transforming. We came Holding lit candles, the religious only to seek Jesus; we came at renewed their vows before the bishop. the invitation of Jesus; and we serve in the Lord’s “Eternal Triune God, trusting in your faithful vineyard,” she said love, I renew my vows to follow Christ in chastity, During this year, we religious should “renew poverty and obedience. I commit myself anew to our religious commitment to make the Gospel serve the Church in the apostolate entrusted to our sole way and book of life” and “witness to CONSECRATED LIFE on 2 my institute. Grant me the grace, Lord, through NE WS EDIT OR By MICHAEL WOJCIK “You not only heard [God’s] call and responded, but every day you continue to say, ‘Yes, Lord, here I am to do your will.’ ” BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI RENEWAL OF VOWS A male religious holds a candle, while reciting his renewal of vows, on Feb. 15 in St. Philip the Apostle Church, Clifton. Bishop Serratelli presided over the diocesan commemoration of World Day for Consecrated Life, attended by religious priests, brothers and sisters from many of the 45 religious institutes that serve the Paterson Diocese. DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS 40 D AYS F OR L IFE By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER Pro-life campaign invites faithful to take part in peaceful vigil against abortion during Lent simply because it’s about saving ba-bies and saving the mothers, who can experience a lot of emotional pain. This is about saving lives and standing up for life” During the time outside on the sidewalk in front of the clinic, ad-vocates will pray the rosary, hand out literature about alternatives to abortion and counsel women. Participants are invited to bring signs or a sign will be provided for them. The Morristown clinic is located three blocks from St. Margaret of Scotland Parish here, where Father Hernan Arias serves as pastor. “Being a part of these vigils is for not only those who consider themselves pro-life but for every Christian or Catholic who believes in the sanity of life,” said Father Arias. “We are not only praying for life but also we giving a great witness of our faith and taking that faith to the streets.” For several years, the Morris County Right to Life has been par-ticipating in these vigils, which often include high school students from Morris Catholic in Denville and Villa Walsh Academy here. Many senior citizens also spend time outside the clinics. Parents often come with their children, which Perkowski encour-ages families to do. “When children participate, it 40 DAYS FOR LIFE on 13 MORRISTOWN As Lent begins, Cath olics around the world will make Lenten promises, often fasting and making sacrifices to help the poor for the next 40 days to grow closer to Christ. Lent is also an important time for the Morris County Right to Life organization. For Lent, the group is inviting the faithful to join its Lenten cause, “40 Days for Life,” an inter-national campaign of prayer and fasting, peaceful vigils and commu-nity outreach. Beginning on Ash Wednesday and ending on Palm Sunday, March 29, pro life advocates will keep vigil outside Planned Parenthood, 196 Speedwell Ave. here during the clin-ic’s 40 hours of operation each week. Times begin as early as 9 a.m. with its latest closing at 8 p.m. Each day has a different schedule. Time slots are available during different hours of the day for anyone who would like to take part. It is suggested vol-unteers keep vigil for an hour or two per week. There will be daily updates for anyone who signs up for the organization’s newsletter. Stephen Perkowski, president of Morris County Right to Life, said, “It’s important that people come

Diocese Marks World Day For Consecrated Life

Michael Wojcik

Bishop thanks religious during prayer service

CLIFTON Priests, brothers and sisters from many of the 45 religious institutes that serve the Paterson Diocese gathered together Feb. 15 in St. Philip the Apostle Church here to mark the diocesan celebration of World Day for Consecrated Life.

On that afternoon, they looked back at the histories of their communities with gratitude; to the present with passion for their various charisms; and to the future with hope.

Bishop Serratelli presided over the prayer service with Benedictine Abbott Richard Cronin of St. Mary’s Abbey, Morristown. Filling the church were many religious, including priests, brothers and sisters, as well as men and women in formation or still in discernment, lay associates and diocesan priests and Chancery personnel, who came in support. Holding lit candles, the religious renewed their vows before the bishop.

“Eternal Triune God, trusting in your faithful love, I renew my vows to follow Christ in chastity, poverty and obedience. I commit myself anew to serve the Church in the apostolate entrusted to my institute. Grant me the grace, Lord, through the intercession of Our Lady and the prayers and support of my institute to live these vows faithfully,” participants recited together. Daytime Prayer service was filled with hymns of praise to God by musicians and singers from religious communities and Catholic high school students.

Under the theme for the Year for Consecrated Life, “Wake Up The World,” this year’s prayer service featured a reflection by Sister Ascenza Tizzano, provincial superior of the Religious Teachers Filippini in Morristown.

“How privileged we are. Our call to consecrated life is recognized and celebrated by the entire Church. We thank Pope Francis for raising the dignity of our vocation. Every consecrated person, he said, is a gift for the people of God on this journey,” Sister Ascenza said. “We are invited to pause and to reflect, ‘For whom do I work?’ ‘In whose service am I?’ and ‘Why am I here?’ The answers to these questions impact our everyday and are transforming. We came only to seek Jesus; we came at the invitation of Jesus; and we serve in the Lord’s vineyard,” she said

During this year, we religious should “renew our religious commitment to make the Gospel our sole way and book of life” and “witness to the joy of the Gospel — to joyously proclaim it and then, through our encounters with others, fire them up to do exactly the same thing.” Religious look to the founders and foundresses of their communities, “men and women of the Gospel, who led daring and heroic lives” and whose examples today continue to inspire their followers. Throughout history, religious have been at the forefront of establishing, such facilities and ministries as hospitals, schools and nursing homes and, in recent years, have expanded their roles in social services, Sister Ascenza said.

“Today, we must be open to new horizons, where the Spirit of God continues to invite and to lead us,” said Sister Ascenza, adding that religious communities need young people to follow in their footsteps — young people, who might have been in the congregation that afternoon. “We are disciples on the journey of hope.”

After the procession into St. Philip’s that started the prayer service, Sister of Christian Charity Mary Edward Spohrer, diocesan chancellor and delegate for religious, led a Litany of Thanks, “acknowledging the various forms of consecrated life with which the Spirit has blessed us, here in the Diocese of Paterson.” Representatives of these communities approached the altar, placed a flower there and offered a prayer.

Participants gave thanks for:

• Cloistered and contemplative life, represented by the 17 Carmelite nuns in Morristown, who “live a hidden life of prayer, penance and sacrifice in a community of faith,” Sister Mary Edward said.

• Monastic life, represented by the three Benedictine monasteries in the diocese: St. Mary’s Abbey, Morristown; St. Paul’s Monastery, Clifton; and Holy Face Monastery, Clifton. Their “fidelity to liturgical prayer, Lectio Divina, stability, common life and vowed consecration enrich the people of God,” she said.

• Hermetic life, represented by the Hermits of Carmel and the Hermits of Bethlehem, Chester, “whose way of life calls them to a life of stricter withdrawal from the world, the silence of solitude and assiduous prayer and penance,” she said.

• Religious brothers, sisters and priests in institutes with an active apostolic character. Their works of charity, advocacy, teaching, preaching and healing “bring Christ’s love in countless ways to the people of God,” Sister Mary Edward said.

• Priests and brothers in religious institutes, “who have embraced the apostolic charism of their founders and live the mission of Christ with zeal as vowed religious,” sister said.

• Emerging forms of consecrated life in the diocese, such as the Sisters of the Church and the Sisters for the Church. “Both groups, founded after Vatican Council II, model their lives after the women in the early Church. They do not live a common life but have embraced celibacy for the sake of God’s kingdom and offer themselves in lifelong, dedicated service to the Church,” she said.

• Men and women in initial formation and discernment within our diocese, our Monasteries, motherhouses, houses of formation and house of discernment, such as Casa Guadalupe in Clifton, which “continues to welcome new members, who are seeking to discern God’s will for their lives,” she said.

Concluding the prayer service, Bishop Serratelli gave thanks to God for “calling all of you to follow the Son into consecrated life in a generous and giving way.”

“I also thank every one of you. You not only heard that call and responded, but everyday you continue to say, ‘Yes, Lord, here I am to do your will,’ ” Bishop Serratelli said.

“The Church is need of more young men and women to give their lives to the Church for the honor and glory of God. It’s the example of your life — your dedicated service, your joy that radiates from your faces and the charity that you show — that will raise up from among us the young men and women, who will take our places,” Bishop Serratelli said.

After the prayer service — among the many Year of Consecrated Life events planned for the diocese — participants went to St. Philip’s parish hall. There, they watched a 10-minute video about institutes that serve the diocese, called “A Concert of Charisms,” listened to music by Salesian Sisters, Franciscan Sisters of St. Elizabeth and the Sisters of Christian Charity and enjoyed refreshments and fellowship.

In the parish hall, Brother Cyril Offiong of Nigeria had come with some of the fellow members of his community, the Vocationists, in Florham Park. Anticipating taking final vows soon, he has been studying at I'm maculate Conception Seminary, South Orange.

“We promote vocations, whether at a parish, mission or school. I love my community. We are from different parts of the world and have different ways to explore our faith,” Brother Cyril said. “The prayer service is exciting, because we religious get to see that we are all in this together, living out our different charisms. It’s so encouraging,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Diocese+Marks+World+Day+For+Consecrated+Life/1933867/246853/article.html.

40 Days For Life

Cecile San Agustin

Pro-life campaign invites faithful to take part in peaceful vigil against abortion during Lent

MORRISTOWN As Lent begins, Catholics around the world will make Lenten promises, often fasting and making sacrifices to help the poor for the next 40 days to grow closer to Christ.

Lent is also an important time for the Morris County Right to Life organization. For Lent, the group is inviting the faithful to join its Lenten cause, “40 Days for Life,” an international campaign of prayer and fasting, peaceful vigils and community outreach.

Beginning on Ash Wednesday and ending on Palm Sunday, March 29, pro life advocates will keep vigil outside Planned Parenthood, 196 Speedwell Ave. Here during the clinic’s 40 hours of operation each week. Times begin as early as 9 a.m. with its latest closing at 8 p.m. Each day has a different schedule. Time slots are available during different hours of the day for anyone who would like to take part. It is suggested volunteers keep vigil for an hour or two per week. There will be daily updates for anyone who signs up for the organization’s newsletter.

Stephen Perkowski, president of Morris County Right to Life, said, “It’s important that people come simply because it’s about saving babies and saving the mothers, who can experience a lot of emotional pain. This is about saving lives and standing up for life”

During the time outside on the sidewalk in front of the clinic, advocates will pray the rosary, hand out literature about alternatives to abortion and counsel women. Participants are invited to bring signs or a sign will be provided for them.

The Morristown clinic is located three blocks from St. Margaret of Scotland Parish here, where Father Hernan Arias serves as pastor. “Being a part of these vigils is for not only those who consider themselves prolife but for every Christian or Catholic who believes in the sanity of life,” said Father Arias. “We are not only praying for life but also we giving a great witness of our faith and taking that faith to the streets.”

For several years, the Morris County Right to Life has been participating in these vigils, which often include high school students from Morris Catholic in Denville and Villa Walsh Academy here. Many senior citizens also spend time outside the clinics. Parents often come with their children, which Perkowski encourages families to do.

“When children participate, it has a great impact on the women who think about abortion,” he said. “They see the children and realize the potential of life.”

While the vigils are peaceful, Father Arias and Perkowski said it is common for the prolife advocates to be criticized for their efforts by others.

Father Arias said, “It’s even more so a reason to be there. There can be a sense of persecution but it is overcome with a sense of joy. It is always a great experience.”

With Lent starting earlier this year in midwinter, Perkowski understands the commitment and sacrifice many people will be making. “No matter what the weather brings, we need people out there,” he said.

There have been instances where babies in the womb have been saved. Father Arias recalls counseling one of those women, who then turned away from having an abortion. “Never give up on this crusade,” said Father Arias. “Given these sacred days of Lent, our presence (at these vigils) allows us to examine our lives and follow our call to holiness. Protecting the sanctity of life is a part of that call.”

Information: www.morriscountyrighttolife.org

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/40+Days+For+Life/1933869/246853/article.html.

Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here