Background Image

The Beacon The Beacon January 8, 2015 : Page 1

4 DIO C E S E PREP A RE S FOR A NNU A L M A R C H FOR LIFE SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS JANUARY 8, 2015 12 2 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Bishop blesses Diocesan Catholic Charismatic Center at Paterson parish By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER BI S HOP VI S IT S BOONTON C HUR C H FOR NEW YE A R’ S D A Y M ASS BI S HOP C ELEBR A TE S M ASS FOR FE AS T OF THE EPIPH A NY IN C LIFTON C HUR C H 7 10-1 1 12 13 14-15 8 Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS PATERSON On fire with the Holy Spirit and alive in Christ, members of the Catholic Charismatic Renewal in the diocese joined together with Bishop Serratelli for the grand open-ing and blessing of the new diocesan Catholic Charismatic Center at St. Michael Church here Jan. 3. Belonging to 22 different parishes throughout the Paterson Diocese, more than 200 people, most hailing from Latin American countries, filled the new space at St. Michael’s singing charismatic hymns with hands raised high in praise and wor-ship to God. To mark the opening, Bishop Serratelli led a prayer service, which included his blessing of the new center. Father Enrique Corona, pastor of both St. Michael’s and St. Agnes Parish in the city, is director of the new center. “This is an exciting jour-ney for those who worship through the charismatic movement,” he said. “It has been a long time coming for these active Catholics, who bring a spirit of life to the Church. I feel privileged to be the first one to serve this center. We ask for the support of all pastors of the diocese espe-cially those with Hispanic parish-ioners.” The center will host many faith opportunities for Spanish-speaking parishioners in the heart of Paterson “Being charismatic is about being part of the Church, which infuses the Holy Spirit. We feel this is the heart of the Catholic Church” M IRIAM P EREZ , S T . N ICHOLAS PARISHIONER including Bible study every Wednesday, retreats, prayer assem-blies, concerts, youth holy hours and days of renewal. Already the center has a retreat planned during the Feb. 6-7 weekend. Father David CHARISMATIC RENEWAL Bishop Serratelli leads the prayer service that was BEACON PHOTO | RICH GIGLI part of his blessing of the new diocesan Catholic Charismatic Center at St. Michael Church in Paterson on Jan. 3. Father Kevin Corcoran, priest/secretary to the bishop, and Father Enrique Corona, director of the center and pastor of St. Michael and St. Agnes parishes in the city, assist. Cosca Restrepo will be keynote speaker for the “Retiro de Sanacion y Liberacion.” In his remarks during the bless-ing, Bishop Serratelli challenged those in attendance to spread the Gospel message and create a new Pentecost in the Paterson Diocese. The bishop said in Spanish, “I expect from you a new evangeliza-tion using the Word of God, which announces that Jesus is alive and that Jesus’ love is for all people. Through the intercession of the Blessed Mother and with the Holy Spirit, may they grant you the gift of strength so we know how to fol-low Jesus with joy.” Susano Jose, a parishioner of St. Nicholas in Passaic, who is coordi-nator of the center, said, “A place ON FIRE on 9 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Couples at Corpus Christi Parish use technology for good By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR CHATHAM TOWNSHIP All too of-ten, people get caught up spending too much time in front of the screens of smart phones, laptops and tablet computers as a way to stay connect-ed to other people through social media and the Internet. Very easily, they can fall into the dangerous trap of becoming so distracted by all this engaging mobile technology that they lose personal connections to friends, families — and even their faith. With that in mind, two groups of married couples at Corpus Christi Parish here have been gathering pe-Examine online behavior as part of Christian Family Movement series riodically and taking time away from their mobile devices to examine their own behavior online — includ-ing how much time they text or email, surf the Internet or post com-ments on social media. As part of its new three-part Christian Family Movement (CFM) small-group faith-sharing series, “Connected Christian Living,” they have been discussing ways that they can use — or limit the use — of these technologies to maintain healthy relationships with their spouses, children and Jesus, said Linda Wass, Corpus Christi’s pastoral associate for marriage and family ministry. “The response from participating couples has been positive to these outstanding materials that develop a support network of people with sim-ilar values to help each other make a difference in the world, walking in Christian faith,” said Wass, who pi-loted the series — developed by CFM and promoted by the National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers — at Corpus Christi with groups in the fall. “It also spurs fur-ther private discussions among the spouses, leading to deeper intimacy.” The two groups of four couples each, one including a single mother, have been meeting in the home of the facilitating couple for 90-minute sessions. They review the series’ ma-terials to engage in honest discussion about how social media often dis-tracts people from their responsibil-ities as spouses and parents. They also talk about turning off these de-vices to create more quiet time for prayer, Wass said. “These sessions are grassroots. They are very relaxed and take place in the home — a natural place,” said TECHNOLOGY on 7

Couples At Corpus Christi Parish Use Technology For Good

Michael Wojcik

Examine online behavior as part of Christian Family Movement series

CHATHAM TOWNSHIP All too often, people get caught up spending too much time in front of the screens of smart phones, laptops and tablet computers as a way to stay connected to other people through social media and the Internet. Very easily, they can fall into the dangerous trap of becoming so distracted by all this engaging mobile technology that they lose personal connections to friends, families — and even their faith.

With that in mind, two groups of married couples at Corpus Christi Parish here have been gathering periodically and taking time away from their mobile devices to examine their own behavior online — including how much time they text or email, surf the Internet or post comments on social media. As part of its new three-part Christian Family Movement (CFM) small-group faithsharing series, “Connected Christian Living,” they have been discussing ways that they can use — or limit the use — of these technologies to maintain healthy relationships with their spouses, children and Jesus, said Linda Wass, Corpus Christi’s pastoral associate for marriage and family ministry.

“The response from participating couples has been positive to these outstanding materials that develop a support network of people with similar values to help each other make a difference in the world, walking in Christian faith,” said Wass, who piloted the series — developed by CFM and promoted by the National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers — at Corpus Christi with groups in the fall. “It also spurs further private discussions among the spouses, leading to deeper intimacy.”

The two groups of four couples each, one including a single mother, have been meeting in the home of the facilitating couple for 90-minute sessions. They review the series’ materials to engage in honest discussion about how social media often distracts people from their responsibilities as spouses and parents. They also talk about turning off these devices to create more quiet time for prayer, Wass said.

“These sessions are grassroots. They are very relaxed and take place in the home — a natural place,” said Wass, who had heard about CFM years ago and secured the approval of the parish’s Family Ministry Committee and Msgr. James Mahoney, the pastor, who also serves as diocesan vicar general and moderator of the Curia. She then tested the series earlier this year on the parish’s Mom’s Group and Dad’s Group.

During each session, participants examine all the materials, which include reading and reflecting on passages of texts from Scripture or by contemporary theologians and thinkers, and answering probing questions. Then they consider suggestions about the responsible use of social media, either from the text or each other, Wass said.

The first session explored “Finding Solitude and Giving Our Full Attention in a Networked World.” It presented participants with Scripture passages for reflection, such as Mark 1, when Jesus leaves his home in the early morning to pray in a solitary place. Then, the couples discussed questions posed by the material, such as “Why might someone go off to a solitary place to pray?”

Then, couples read and reflected on passages by contemporary thinkers, such as Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI from his “Truth, Proclamation and Authenticity of Life in the Digital Age.” He suggests that “new communications technologies must be placed at the service of the integral good of the individual and of the whole of humanity.” He also wrote, “it is important always to remember that virtual contact cannot and must not take the place of direct human contact with people in every level of our lives.”

Less theological, Lindsey Hoskins, author of the book, “Multitasking Our Relationships,” suggests that there are great benefits to giving loved ones full attention. They are: increased intimacy and attachment, deeper connection and understanding and greater capacity for empathy. It also facilitates active listening skills, which improves communication, Hoskins writes.

In the first session, the couples asked each other honest questions about use of social media and the Internet, designed to help them avoid problems in their real-time relationships. They included: Is anybody not acceptable to “friend” on FaceBook or tweet on Twitter? Is any time to use technology off limits? And Is anywhere on the Internet out of bounds? Then participants resolved to act, maybe scheduling time for prayer or a weekend retreat or day of reflection; turning off their devices for a period of time each day; or creating a “technology free zone” for themselves.

The other two sessions for the “Connected Christian Living” examined “Intimacy and Privacy: Your Marriage and Social Media” and “Connectivity and Our Children.” One host couples for CFM at Corpus Christi was Paul and Susan Garavente, married 23 years with three daughters, ages 15, 16 and 18. Paul Garavente called the sessions “warm, welcoming and casual.”

“This series has strengthened my faith. We have been talking about how our devices affect our lives negatively and positively and asking ourselves if we are being good Christian examples with the way that we use social media. Anything that comes up [in their discussions] is relevant to our becoming better parents and spouses,” Paul Garavente said.

After the two groups complete the “Connected Christian Living” series, Wass plans to introduce a discussion group for grandparents, “The Grand Adventure: a New Call to Grandparenting,” to be held Mondays, Feb. 9 and 23; March 9 and 23; and April 13 and 27. The cost is $10 per family.

Information: Linda Wass, (973) 635-0700, ext. 720.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Couples+At+Corpus+Christi+Parish+Use+Technology+For+Good/1902523/241473/article.html.

Bishop Blesses Diocesan Catholic Charismatic Center At Paterson Parish

Cecile San Agustin

PATERSON On fire with the Holy Spirit and alive in Christ, members of the Catholic Charismatic Renewal in the diocese joined together with Bishop Serratelli for the grand opening and blessing of the new diocesan Catholic Charismatic Center at St. Michael Church here Jan. 3.

Belonging to 22 different parishes throughout the Paterson Diocese, more than 200 people, most hailing from Latin American countries, filled the new space at St. Michael’s singing charismatic hymns with hands raised high in praise and worship to God. To mark the opening, Bishop Serratelli led a prayer service, which included his blessing of the new center.

Father Enrique Corona, pastor of both St. Michael’s and St. Agnes Parish in the city, is director of the new center. “This is an exciting journey for those who worship through the charismatic movement,” he said. “It has been a long time coming for these active Catholics, who bring a spirit of life to the Church. I feel privileged to be the first one to serve this center. We ask for the support of all pastors of the diocese especially those with Hispanic parishioners.”

The center will host many faith opportunities for Spanish-speaking parishioners in the heart of Paterson including Bible study every Wednesday, retreats, prayer assemblies, concerts, youth holy hours and days of renewal. Already the center has a retreat planned during the Feb. 6-7 weekend. Father David Cosca Restrepo will be keynote speaker for the “Retiro de Sanacion y Liberacion.” In his remarks during the blessing, Bishop Serratelli challenged those in attendance to spread the Gospel message and create a new Pentecost in the Paterson Diocese.

The bishop said in Spanish, “I expect from you a new evangelization using the Word of God, which announces that Jesus is alive and that Jesus’ love is for all people.

Through the intercession of the Blessed Mother and with the Holy Spirit, may they grant you the gift of strength so we know how to follow Jesus with joy.”

Susano Jose, a parishioner of St. Nicholas in Passaic, who is coordinator of the center, said, “A place like this has been a dream for the past 30 years. The center is for the whole Paterson Diocese and we invite all to the charismatic renewal. The charismatic prayer movement has helped form so many of us in our faith.”

Catholic Charismatic Renewal is a movement within the Catholic Church in which the presence of the Holy Spirit is felt. The renewal began at a retreat for students at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh in February 1967. Since that time, it has grown throughout the United States and other countries especially in Latin American countries. Pope Francis showed his support by attendeding a Catholic Charismatic Renewal Con - ference in Rome last June, expressing the importance of the movement.

Miriam Perez, part of the diocesan charismatic team and a parishioner of St. Nicholas, said, “Being charismatic is about being part of the Church, which infuses the Holy Spirit. We feel this is the heart of the Catholic Church.”

From around the diocese, parishioners came to the opening of the center including a group of women from St. Michael Parish in Netcong. “They just started their charismatic prayer,” said Perez. “Part of our work at the center will be to help other parishes start their own charismatic movements.” At the blessing, there was also a large presence of young people who are involved in the charismatic movement.

“The charismatic renewal helped me have a deeper understanding about the way the Holy Spirit works within us,” said Justin Carrasco, a student at Kean University in Union and a parishioner of the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in the city. “At first I wasn’t used to praying this way, but then as I began to pray charismatically, I got closer to my faith.”

Father Corona said, “It can be challenging during these times to evangelize the faith, but the center will be a new journey to spread the faith. We will use this place as a tool for evangelization.”

[Information: (973) 523-8413.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Bishop+Blesses+Diocesan+Catholic+Charismatic+Center+At+Paterson+Parish/1902524/241473/article.html.

Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here