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The Beacon The Beacon December 11, 2014 : Page 1

4 DON A TION S TO C HRI S TM AS S H A RING FUND HELP THE NEEDY SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS DECEMBER 11, 2014 E VANGELIZING O N T HE I NTERNET Diocese launches new website using technology as a tool for spreading the Good News 12 6 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR M A RY QUEEN OF A LL N A TION S A LLI A N C E M A RK S 30TH A NNIVER SA RY PRIE S T’ S GLOB A L N A TIVITY S ET S ON DI S PL A Y A T DIO C E SA N C ENTER 13 CLIFTON Bishop Serratelli is inviting the faithful everywhere to visit the diocese’s new website — launched Dec. 8, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception — that gives the Church of Paterson’s presence online a significant new way to more effectively evangelize. In a video on its home page, Bishop Serratelli welcomes visitors to the site (www.rcdop.org), en-courages them to explore it, to come back often and let the dio-cese know what they think about it. “I am very pleased with the re-sults. I know you will be too,” says Bishop Serratelli, who con-vened a committee early this year to undertake the development and production of a new website. In the video, the bishop tells visitors, “See how extensive the work of the Paterson Diocese truly is. I know you will come to realize the dynamism that is Roman Catholicism in our counties of Morris, Passaic and Sussex.” The website takes advantage of technolo-gy that makes it easier for visitors to navigate and for the diocese to maintain and update daily. These capabili-ties, in part, “bring communications in the diocese into the 21st century,” said Dennis Rodano, diocesan proj-ects manager and a member of the Com -mu ni cations Department committee. The site also takes advantage of the newest technolo-gy that optimizes it for mobile de-vices, such as Smartphones and tab lets. The pages are automatical-ly compressed so they can fit on the screen of the device’s web browser. The Texas-based web de-veloper eCatholic also used by the Archdioceses of New York and Boston provided the platform for the site, while the committee over-saw the posting and editing of the vast volumes of content from the Diocesan Pastoral Center. Other committee mem bers were: Richard Sokerka, communica-tions director, editor / general manager of The Beacon and com-mittee chairman; Edward Card, former technology director of the Schools Office; Thomas Barrett, dioce-san coordinator for spe-cial projects; Father Edward Lambro, direc-tor of public relations and development for Catholic Charities; and Sister Catherine McDonnell, vice chancellor for planning and urban ministry. “The committee worked dili-gently and collaboratively for many months to bring this launch EVANGELIZING ON THE INTERNET on 2 6-7 10-1 1 12 14-15 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS Bishop begins series on spirituality of Mary at Pompton Lakes parish Bt MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI ‘O H OLY N IGHT ’ Members of the diocesan children’s choir sing during the annual diocesan Christmas concert, which was held Dec. 7 in St. Peter the Apostle Church, Parsippany. For story and more photos, please turn to page 16. POMPTON LAKES The story in Scripture about the wedding at Cana recounts the first miracle that Jesus ever performed — that very act of turning water into wine, which marks the start of his public ministry. But for Catholics, this Gospel account also shows the Blessed Mother as a model of faith and a part of salvation history. She helped bring about the miracle by simply asking Jesus, based on her unshakable belief that he as the Messiah could make it happen. That’s what Bishop Serratelli told faithful, who gathered in the Carnevale Center at St. Mary’s Church here Dec. 4 to listen to his pres-entation, “Mary: from a Biblical Point of View.” He kicked off a series of talks and events,“A Mary Advent: Mary: Mother of Jesus and Mother of the Church,” that venerated her and explore various aspects of her spirituality. The bishop A MARY ADVENT on 2

Evangelizing On The Internet

Michael Wojcik

Diocese launches new website using technology as a tool for spreading the Good News

CLIFTON Bishop Serratelli is inviting the faithful everywhere to visit the diocese’s new website — launched Dec. 8, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception — that gives the Church of Paterson’s presence online a significant new way to more effectively evangelize.

In a video on its home page, Bishop Serratelli welcomes visitors to the site (www.rcdop.org), encourages them to explore it, to come back often and let the diocese know what they think about it. “I am very pleased with the results. I know you will be too,” says Bishop Serratelli, who convened a committee early this year to undertake the development and production of a new website. In the video, the bishop tells visitors, “See how extensive the work of the Paterson Diocese truly is. I know you will come to realize the dynamism that is Roman Catholicism in our counties of Morris, Passaic and Sussex.”

The website takes advantage of technology that makes it easier for visitors to navigate and for the diocese to maintain and update daily. These capabilities, in part, “bring communications in the diocese into the 21st century,” said Dennis Rodano, diocesan projects manager and a member of the Com - mu ni cations Department committee.

The site also takes advantage of the newest technology that optimizes it for mobile devices, such as Smartphones and tab lets. The pages are automatically compressed so they can fit on the screen of the device’s web browser. The Texas-based web developer eCatholic also used by the Archdioceses of New York and Boston provided the platform for the site, while the committee oversaw the posting and editing of the vast volumes of content from the Diocesan Pastoral Center.

Other committee members were: Richard Sokerka, communications director, editor / general manager of The Beacon and committee chairman; Edward Card, former technology director of the Schools Office; Thomas Barrett, diocesan coordinator for special projects; Father Edward Lambro, director of public relations and development for Catholic Charities; and Sister Catherine McDonnell, vice chancellor for planning and urban ministry.

“The committee worked diligently and collaboratively for many months to bring this launch date to fruition,” said Sokerka, “and we are very pleased with the result.” But the launch is only a starting point, he said. “Our long-term communications plan for the diocesan site includes improving content regularly, becoming involved in social media and partnering with eCatholic to build a new website for The Beacon.”

“This site makes the diocese — a complex organization — more understandable to the faithful. It also shows that ‘The Diocese’ includes everyone in the Church of Paterson,” said Barrett, who acknowledged and thanked Joseph Cece, who created the diocese’s previous site and from its inception was webmaster. “Joe Cece provided a great service to the Diocese with the initial build of the original website; he continues to host sites for us and helps us with the content transition to the new site.

“We hope the new site is a vehicle to connect the faithful to the ministries of the local Church,” Barrett said.

Just a few of what visitors to the site can view are a diocesan calendar; news from The Beacon, as well as live feeds from the Vatican and Catholic web services for up-to-date worldwide Church news; updates on the renovation of St. John’s Cathedral; a directory of priests, deacons and departments and offices; charitable works in diocese and a blog on consecrated life. Visitors can easily search the site by topic, such as finding a list of parishes in the diocese that celebrate a 7 p.m. Mass on Sundays, Father Lambro said.

The site provides links to other diocesan agencies that host their own sites, including St. Paul Inside the Walls, which now uses the eCatholic platform; Catholic Family and Community Services; Straight and Narrow; the Department for Persons with Disabilities; and the Schools Office, Barrett said, adding the diocese hopes to expand the site to include a directory for deacons and religious. Helping the diocese create the site with her programming skills is web developer and computer professional Mary Lennon of Our Lady of the Lake Parish, Sparta, who was graduated from both Rev. Brown School and Pope John XXIII Regional High School, both in Sparta.

“This new site not only gives the diocese a fresh look online, but it also gives us a way to evangelize — to spread the ‘Good News’ of the Gospel,” Sister Catherine said.

Father Lambro called the new site “light and bright” and said that it “reflects a Catholic sense of joy, welcoming and community.” He noted that the site even features a section where people can report good things that are happening in the local Church.

“There is so much good news about what the Church is doing. Sometimes it is hard to get the good news out to people so they can be aware of what the Church, and in our case, the Paterson Diocese, is doing. This is similar to what Pope Francis has been trying to achieve — helping people to know that in the midst of real problems, there is so much good being accomplished by the Catholic Church. The Beacon tells our story every week, but it is not enough,” said Msgr. James Mahoney, vicar general, moderator of the Curia and pastor of Corpus Christi Parish, Chatham Township. “The new website is another important way of telling the Good News. It will give those who visit the site a rather good understanding of the scope of the work of the diocese and necessary information about all phases of diocesan life. This site is a work in progress that, while diocesan in scope, will also give people an easy way to connect with their parish’s communication efforts as well. We will keep adding to it, changing it, and helping everyone to see the vitality of the Church of Paterson. It is a story worth telling,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Evangelizing+On+The+Internet/1882227/238192/article.html.

Bishop Begins Series On Spirituality Of Mary At Pompton Lakes Parish

Michael Wojcik

POMPTON LAKES The story in Scripture about the wedding at Cana recounts the first miracle that Jesus ever performed — that very act of turning water into wine, which marks the start of his public ministry. But for Catholics, this Gospel account also shows the Blessed Mother as a model of faith and a part of salvation history. She helped bring about the miracle by simply asking Jesus, based on her unshakable belief that he as the Messiah could make it happen.

That’s what Bishop Serratelli told faithful, who gathered in the Carnevale Center at St. Mary’s Church here Dec. 4 to listen to his presentation, “Mary: from a Biblical Point of View.” He kicked off a series of talks and events,“A Mary Advent: Mary: Mother of Jesus and Mother of the Church,” that venerated her and explore various aspects of her spirituality. The bishop examined what Scripture tells us about Mary’s role in the Church by looking at important details in the story: the Blessed Mother’s request of Jesus; Jesus’ response to her; and Jesus’ addressing her as “woman.”

“Mary tells Jesus, ‘They have no wine.’ She notices the lack of wine, not the guests. This shows that Mary is never a spectator in our lives. She sees our difficulties and initiates a solution to our needs. She begs the Lord on behalf of our needs, before we even know them. Mary is our intercessor,” Bishop Serratelli said. “Mary also shows confidence in Jesus. She knows that he will do something about it. Mary is the seat of wisdom; she knows who Jesus is. She is a role model of faith. She is the first to believe in Jesus and is the best believer. After Mary’s act of faith, it comes to fulfillment,” the bishop said.

During the wedding, the Blessed Mother’s faith encouraged her to tell Jesus, “They have no wine.” She wanted Jesus to act but leaves him with the freedom to act. Even though Mary makes no demands of Jesus, her statement is bold, because she asks Jesus to intervene, said Bishop Serratelli, who spent 27 years teaching Scripture at Immaculate Conception Seminary at Seton Hall University, South Orange.

“Mary realized that Jesus is the Messiah. Her request is an act of faith. Faith is believing before seeing. Mary believes in him and the power of him to do so,” said Bishop Serratelli, who noted that the miracle also helped the often-doubting disciples to recognize Jesus as the Messiah.

In responding to Mary’s request, Jesus speaks words that might seem disrespectful, according to the following translations: “Woman, what do I have to do?”; “Your concern is not mine”; or “Never mind; don’t be worried.” Any of these translations might seem as if Jesus refuses his mother. But Mary does not take it that way, as demonstrated by her command to the wine steward, “Do whatever he tells you to do,” the bishop said.

A more accurate translation of Jesus’ response might be: “What is this between you and me?” — an acknowledgment that something has transpired to change the relationship between Mary and her son. At Cana, Jesus notices a change in Mary’s attitude and the way that she speaks to him. That’s because she recognizes the start of what will become his public ministry. In time, Jesus too puts some distance between his mother and him, as his ministry progresses, Bishop Serratelli said.

At Cana, Jesus addresses his mother using a word that many people might find offensive today: “woman.” Yet, ancient Israelites did not consider this title disrespectful. Jesus describes himself as the Son of God in direct relation to the Blessed Mother as “woman.” In the Gospel, Jesus emphasizes that Mary is blessed, not because she is the mother who bore him, but because she believes in him, pointing directly to her role in salvation history, Bishop Serratelli said.

“Jesus and Mary are bound by more than flesh and blood. They are bound by the common bond: allegiance and obedience to the Father,” said Bishop Serratelli, who noted that Revelations 12 speaks about a mysterious woman [Mary], who stomps on the head of a serpent [a reference to Satan as a serpent in Garden of Eden story in Genesis]. “Mary is the new Eve, leading us to obedience to the Father.”

Following his presentation, Bishop Serratelli answered questions from the audience.

“It was nice to have Bishop Serratelli here. It gives people a chance to see him,” said Franciscan Father Frank Sevola, pastor of the Franciscan-run St. Mary’s. “The bishop is a Scripture expert, so it’s great to hear him speak on something that he is passionate about.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Bishop+Begins+Series+On+Spirituality+Of+Mary+At+Pompton+Lakes+Parish/1882229/238192/article.html.

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