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The Beacon The Beacon November 13 2014 : Page 1

3 DIO C E S E S EEK S CA NDID A TE S FOR BO A RD S , C OUN C IL S SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS NOVEMBER 13, 2014 5 3 ASS UMPTION C OLLEGE MOVING TO MORRI S CA THOLI C CA MPU S BI S HOP C ELEBR A TE S M ASS A T WPU CA MPU S MINI S TRY C ENTER Six honored for service to poor, disadvantaged By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR 6-7 4 5 8-9 10-12 12 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS SERVING ‘THE LEAST AMONG US’ Diocesan Catholic Charities presented its annual Caritas Awards BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Y OUTH W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS O BITUARIES to six people for their care of the poor during its annual Catholic Charities Caritas Gala, Nov. 8 at the Birchwood Manor, Whippany. Receiving the award for Advocacy is Msgr. Mark Giordani, rector of St. John’s Cathedral, Paterson, who addresses the audience of more then 450 people, as Joseph Duffy, Catholic Charities’ president, listens. WHIPPANY Diocesan Catholic Charities presented its annual Caritas Awards to six faithful of the Church of Paterson in recognition of their outstanding service to the poor and love for humanity. Honorees included the rector of St. John’s Cathedral, Pater -son, for speaking up on behalf of the poor; a married couple from St. Joseph Parish, Mendham, for promoting strong family life and values and advocating for the well-being of children; and the three chief financial officers (CFOs) of Catholic Charities agencies for com-bining their knowledge and expertise to keep improving the financial health of the organiza-tion, so that it can continue to expand its offerings of social services. Catholic Charities bestowed these prestigious honors in three specific categories at its annual Catholic Charities Caritas Gala, held Nov. 8 at the Birchwood Catholic Charities’ Caritas Awards CARITAS AWARDS on 2 Bishop’s Annual Appeal supports retired priests By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER ‘Gives back’ to priests at Nazareth Village Charities agencies, the Catholic Academy of Passaic County and seminarian education. Currently, 14 priests reside at the one-of-a-kind residence, which provides a well-earned option for priests to have both fraternity and independence. While these priests may be in retirement, many of them continue to min-ister throughout the diocese, as-sisting at weekday and weekend Masses, making sick calls and taking part in diocesan events. One of the residents is Father Edward Davey, 89, who is happy living at Nazareth Village. “It’s a real home here. You have time for your-self and you have time with your brother priests. We often gather in the common room to sit and talk. We laugh and joke together. We are a family,” he said. Father Davey, former pastor of St. Joseph Parish in Newton, has been in residence here since 1999 after serving for 19 years at the Newton parish and 61 years in to-tal as a priest. At 89, Father Davey still stays active. He still drives and helps out at Our Lady of the Mountain, St. Luke and St. Mark, all in Long Valley. Being able to still serve at parishes is a blessing to Father Davey, who said he would continue to do as long as he is able. A special part of living at Nazareth Village is never feeling a sense of lone-liness. The priest residents have one CHESTER Like any retirement home, a scenic and peaceful setting surrounds Nazareth Village here, but unlike any other retirement home, Nazareth Village is different because its residents are priests who gave a lifetime of service to God’s people. Opened in July 1993, more than 50 diocesan priests who served as pastors, educators, chaplains and mis-sionaries have called Nazareth Village home as they live out their golden years with their brother priests. Because of the service these men have given, the Bishop’s Annual Appeal gives back to them. Under the theme “Be an Ambassador for Christ,” the Bishop’s Annual Appeal will support not only Nazareth Village but also diocesan Catholic shared meal daily and Father Davey said, “If one of us misses a meal or isn’t around, we are always concerned for each other. The staff is also con-cerned. They really look after us.” Nazareth Village consists of 10 condominiums that have been con-nected to form five large buildings — Our Lady of Nazareth Residence, St. Joseph Residence, St. Francis Residence, St. John Vianney Resi -dence, Cabrini Home Health Care Facility, and “The Carriage House” maintenance building. Each priest-resident’s apartment has a sitting room, bedroom, bath-room, and kitchenette. In addition, there is a game room, library, refec-tory, TV room, parlor, laundry, phys-ical therapy room, scriptorium, and an exercise room for their use. The residents are charged a portion of APPEAL on 2

Six Honored For Service To Poor, Disadvantaged

Michael Wojcik

WHIPPANY Diocesan Catholic Charities presented its annual Caritas Awards to six faithful of the Church of Paterson in recognition of their outstanding service to the poor and love for humanity. Honorees included the rector of St. John’s Cathedral, Pater - son, for speaking up on behalf of the poor; a married couple from St. Joseph Parish, Mendham, for promoting strong family life and values and advocating for the well-being of children; and the three chief financial officers (CFOs) of Catholic Charities agencies for combining their knowledge and expertise to keep improving the financial health of the organization, so that it can continue to expand its offerings of social services.

Catholic Charities bestowed these prestigious honors in three specific categories at its annual Catholic Charities Caritas Gala, held Nov. 8 at the Birchwood Manor here to the following faith-filled humanitarians: Msgr. Mark Giordani, St. John’s rector, for Advocacy; Steve and Kristy Goulart of St. Joseph’s for Service; and Buby “Bob” Jacob, Dharmesh Parikh and Rocco Zappile, Catholic Charities CFOs, for Convening. More than 450 benefactors attended the gala, which raised more than $330,000 for services Catholic Charities provides to the poor, said Joseph Duffy, president of Catholic Charities and executive director of Straight & Narrow.

Duffy’s opening remarks at the gala offered a reflection on Pope Francis’ apostolic exhortation, “Evangelii Gaudium,” or “The Joy of the Gospel.” In the document, the pontiff calls all to a personal encounter with Christ and to new and renewed evangelization. Pope Francis challenges us to be evangelizers who “embrace human life, touching the suffering flesh of Christ in others” and thus take on “the smell of the sheep” and “the sheep are willing to hear our voice,” Duffy said. “The work of Catholic Charities is pretty much all wrapped up in welcoming the sheep, getting to know them and their needs. As we walk with those we serve and offer a ‘hand up,’ we are heeding his holiness’ words,” Duffy said.

Catholic Charities honored Msgr. Giordani, a priest of the diocese since 1969 and St. John’s rector since 1987, with the award for Advocacy. He has served Paterson parishes all his priestly life, including Our Lady of Lourdes and St. Gerard’s, and established the Christian Riders Motorcycle Club. Msgr. Giordani has served as a chaplain for the Paterson Police Department, the Passaic County Sheriff’s Department and the Port Authority, and spent time at Ground Zero after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.

“Father Mark is a humble person who serves and loves his God and advocates for and serves his fellow man and woman,” Duffy told the audience. “[When I got to know him years ago], I quickly learned every time Father Mark called me, he would be asking — or advocating — for something for someone in need and he called a lot. And I came to learn too, that I was but one of a rather large list of people that he would call when someone he cared for needed something. Those calls might be to a brother priest, a politician, a prospective employer or another social service provider,” he said.

In response, Msgr. Giordani thanked Catholic Charities for the “great honor.” The priest also thanked his family, friends and benefactors for their continued support.

“It’s been a privilege to serve the great, loving, humble and faith-filled people of Paterson,” Msgr. Giordani said. “Catholic Charities does an outstanding job in his great mission. You will live in my hearts and prayers always,” he said.

The award for Service went to to the Goularts, who have been married 34 years and have four daughters and three grandchildren. Kristy Goulart has served as a courtappointed special advocate (CASA) for abused and neglected children in Morris and Sussex counties, while Steven Goulart, executive vice president and chief investment officer for MetLife Inc., has served as on CASA’s board of trustees. The Goularts are licensed foster parents and are active at St. Joseph’s, and St. Paul Inside the Walls, Madison. They serve as a host family for the National Evangelization Team (NET) when it visits the diocese each year, Duffy said.

“Steve and Kristy are passionate about promoting strong family life and values, and advocating for the well-being of children,” Duffy told the audience.

In response, Steve Goulart said that the couple felt greatly “humbled” to receive the award and accepted it “to draw attention to the good work that Catholic Charities does.”

“Jesus gave us a great example of reaching out to help the most vulnerable,” said Kristy Goulart, who also praised the work of Catholic Charities in serving at-risk youth. “We are God’s instruments in helping children from broken homes. We are trying to use our gifts and talents to help others,” she said.

The award for Convening went to Jacob, Parikh and Zappile, who have a combined 82 years of service to the agency. For 29 years, Jacob has served as CFO of Catholic Family & Community Services (CFCS). For 28 years, Parikh has served as CFO of Straight & Narrow. For 25 years, Zappile has served as CFO of the Department of Persons with Disabilities (DPD). These honorees have made “sure that we maximize revenues, leverage that to pay the bills and staff and expand to meet our client needs and be certain that Catholic Charities stays faithful to its preferential option for caring for the poor,” Duffy said.

All three honorees for Convening spoke, including Jacob, who said that that Jesus’ call that we all reach out to the poor in Matthew 25 — “When I was hungry, you gave me to eat” — perfectly captures the mission of Catholic Charities.

“We assist the poor and the disabled. All of your donations to Catholic Charities go to care for the poor,” Jacob said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Six+Honored+For+Service+To+Poor%2C+Disadvantaged/1860378/233769/article.html.

Bishop's Annual Appeal Supports Retired Priests

Cecile San Agustin

‘Gives back’ to priests at Nazareth Village

CHESTER Like any retirement home, a scenic and peaceful setting surrounds Nazareth Village here, but unlike any other retirement home, Nazareth Village is different because its residents are priests who gave a lifetime of service to God’s people.

Opened in July 1993, more than 50 diocesan priests who served as pastors, educators, chaplains and missionaries have called Nazareth Village home as they live out their golden years with their brother priests.

Because of the service these men have given, the Bishop’s Annual Appeal gives back to them. Under the theme “Be an Ambassador for Christ,” the Bishop’s Annual Appeal will support not only Nazareth Village but also diocesan Catholic Charities agencies, the Catholic Academy of Passaic County and seminarian education.

Currently, 14 priests reside at the one-of-a-kind residence, which provides a well-earned option for priests to have both fraternity and independence. While these priests may be in retirement, many of them continue to minister throughout the diocese, assisting at weekday and weekend Masses, making sick calls and taking part in diocesan events.

One of the residents is Father Edward Davey, 89, who is happy living at Nazareth Village. “It’s a real home here. You have time for yourself and you have time with your brother priests. We often gather in the common room to sit and talk. We laugh and joke together. We are a family,” he said.

Father Davey, former pastor of St. Joseph Parish in Newton, has been in residence here since 1999 after serving for 19 years at the Newton parish and 61 years in total as a priest. At 89, Father Davey still stays active. He still drives and helps out at Our Lady of the Mountain, St. Luke and St. Mark, all in Long Valley. Being able to still serve at parishes is a blessing to Father Davey, who said he would continue to do as long as he is able.

A special part of living at Nazareth Village is never feeling a sense of loneliness. The priest residents have one shared meal daily and Father Davey said, “If one of us misses a meal or isn’t around, we are always concerned for each other. The staff is also concerned. They really look after us.”

Nazareth Village consists of 10 condominiums that have been connected to form five large buildings — Our Lady of Nazareth Residence, St. Joseph Residence, St. Francis Residence, St. John Vianney Residence, Cabrini Home Health Care Facility, and “The Carriage House” maintenance building.

Each priest-resident’s apartment has a sitting room, bedroom, bathroom, and kitchenette. In addition, there is a game room, library, refectory, TV room, parlor, laundry, physical therapy room, scriptorium, and an exercise room for their use. The residents are charged a portion of their monthly pension for rent.

Msgr. Ray Lopatesky, who has served as director of the residence since its opening, said, “Nazareth Village is not an ‘old age home’ but as any priest resident will attest, it is a happy place where there is a true sense of fraternity and friendship. It is a place full of life, a lot of fun, tremendous support and much love.”

The cornerstone and heart of Nazareth Village is the chapel, “Our Lady, Mother of Priests.” That is where the priests celebrate the Sacred Liturgy when they are not helping out in area parishes. The chapel reminds all of the lifetime commitment that each priest makes for the people of God.

To those who will support the Appeal and other benefactors to Nazareth Village, Father Davey said, “I thank the people for what they made possible here at Nazareth Village. I want them to know we pray for all of the people who have been so good and so kind daily at our Masses in our prayers. We are very grateful to you.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Bishop%27s+Annual+Appeal+Supports+Retired+Priests+/1860379/233769/article.html.

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