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The Beacon The Beacon October 30, 2014 : Page 1

3 ‘M A KING A LL SA INT S ’ PROGR A M I S SA TURD A Y A T S T. P A UL IN S IDE THE W A LL S SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS 10/30/2014 N ATIVE A MERICAN S YMBOLS Bishop’s Annual Appeal 5 A TE S 2 D S ET FOR helps the most needy of the diocese in many ways By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER BENEFIT C ON C ERT S TO A ID ORPH A NED S TUDENT S IN E AS TERN EUROPE FIGHT S POVERTY ‘ONE F A MILY A T A TIME’ 7 8-9 10 11 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS TOM HE A LEY LOOK S A T 8 HOW CA THOLI C C H A RITIE S BEACON PHOTO | MICHAEL WOJCIK Y OUTH V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS O BITUARIES A stained-glass window in St. Kateri Tekakwitha Church, Sparta, shows the Native American symbols of earth, air, fire and water from the culture of the parish’s patron. The Sussex County faith community also has carried its deep spirituality outside to several devotional spaces on its campus, which are featured in this week’s installment of The Beacon’s “Spiritual Road Trip Through the Diocese.” See story/photos on page 4. PATERSON Every year, thousands of people in need reach out to one of the many diocesan Catholic Charities agencies because they are at risk of losing their homes, in need of food or some other emergency. With natural disasters like Hurri -canes Irene and Sandy and the struggling economy in recent years, diocesan agencies helped record numbers of families, never turning away the people most in need. Through its Catholic Family and Community Services (CFCS) depart-ment here and its three divisions – Hispanic Information Center in Passaic, Hope House in Dover and Father English Center here, these families are able to receive the help they need because of the kindness of the faithful, who keep these agen-cies going. Diane Silbernagel, executive di-rector of CFCS, said, “CFCS provides human and social services for all those who seek our help. We help everyone from infants to seniors.” Under the theme, “Be an Ambas -sador for Christ,” the 2014 Bishop’s Annual Appeal is a way parishioners in churches of the Paterson Diocese can help those in need. Catholic Char ities, which also includes Straight and Narrow and Depart -ment for Persons with Disabilities, is a recipient of the Appeal pledges. The Appeal donations will also sup-port seminarian education, retired priests residing at Nazareth Village in Chester and the Catholic Aca -demy of Passaic County, which serves a number of schools in and around the inner-city. Joe Duffy, president of diocesan Catholic Charities and executive di-rector of Straight and Narrow, said, “Last year we served almost 70,000 different people. The Appeal contin-ues to provide more than $1 million to our agencies each year. While we receive government funds, we could not make ends meet without the sup-ANNUAL APPEAL on 6 ST. PAUL INSIDE THE WALLS Former Wall St. exec examines leadership style of pope By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR MADISON At first glance, these four separate everyday images may not seem to have much in common: a person doing laundry, monastery bells and a pair of dusty shoes and a colorful jacket (unless they are in the laundry). But together, these simple images paint a powerful pic-ture of the strong, yet humble lead-ership style of Pope Francis. Catho -lics everywhere can model his faith-filled demonstrations of the authen-tic power of service; getting in touch with reality, while also taking time for reflection; and cultivating respect others. That’s what Catholics — especial-ly business leaders — learned from Chris Lowney, a former Jesuit sem-inarian and high-level executive for J.P. Morgan, who spoke about “Leading like Pope Francis: Lessons in Management” Oct. 20 at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. Since leaving J.P. Morgan in 2001, he has authored four books, including his latest, “Pope Francis: Why He Leads the Way He Leads — Lessons from the First Jesuit Pope,” which was the basis of his presen-tation, which filled the auditorium at St. Paul’s. “Being a leader today means hav-ing to deal with more and more change and complexity. By defini-tion, a leader must be able to point a way [forward] and influence other people,” said Lowney, chairman of the board of Catholic Heath Initia -tives, a not-for-profit hospital / health care system. “What statement are we making as leaders? Do we cheat people or are we honest? We need good leadership and good habits of leadership. Pope Francis is a case study in that,” he said. St. Paul’s also intended Lowney’s talk to help drum up interest in an Outreach to Business Professionals — a ministry to “help them integrate faith and life” — that the evange-lization center has been developing, said Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization. During his presentation, Lowney described how he gained a clearer picture of the pope’s leadership style by talking to priests, who studied at a Jesuit seminary that he founded outside of his home city in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he later served as archbishop. The author also exam-ined acts of leadership that the pope — formerly Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio — has performed since be-ing elected the leader of the universal Church on March 13, 2013. From then to now, Pope Francis’ way of leading has stayed consistent, Lowney said. Flipping through a PowerPoint slide show, Lowney offered the au-dience — which included a large contingent of Sisters of Christian Charity from Assumption College in LEADING LIKE POPE FRANCIS on 2

Bishop’s Annual Appeal Helps The Most Needy Of The Diocese In Many Ways

Cecile San Agustin

PATERSON Every year, thousands of people in need reach out to one of the many diocesan Catholic Charities agencies because they are at risk of losing their homes, in need of food or some other emergency. With natural disasters like Hurricanes Irene and Sandy and the struggling economy in recent years, diocesan agencies helped record numbers of families, never turning away the people most in need.

Through its Catholic Family and Community Services (CFCS) department here and its three divisions – Hispanic Information Center in Passaic, Hope House in Dover and Father English Center here, these families are able to receive the help they need because of the kindness of the faithful, who keep these agencies going.

Diane Silbernagel, executive director of CFCS, said, “CFCS provides human and social services for all those who seek our help. We help everyone from infants to seniors.”

Under the theme, “Be an Ambassador for Christ,” the 2014 Bishop’s Annual Appeal is a way parishioners in churches of the Paterson Diocese can help those in need. Catholic Charities, which also includes Straight and Narrow and Department for Persons with Disabilities, is a recipient of the Appeal pledges. The Appeal donations will also support seminarian education, retired priests residing at Nazareth Village in Chester and the Catholic Academy of Passaic County, which serves a number of schools in and around the inner-city.

Joe Duffy, president of diocesan Catholic Charities and executive director of Straight and Narrow, said, “Last year we served almost 70,000 different people. The Appeal continues to provide more than $1 million to our agencies each year. While we receive government funds, we could not make ends meet without the support given through the Appeal. The gifts that you will pledge are very important to us.”

While the economy slowly recovers, families still continue to struggle. Silbernagel said, “We see a continuous increase for families in Morris County needing our assistance. We’ve even experienced having clients, who formerly gave to the Appeal or Catholic Charities, now seeking our help.”

Last summer, Bishop Serratelli received a letter from a family in Morris County and brought it to the attention of Duffy, who said, “They were a couple in their 50s, both disabled but their disability applications were still pending. They struggled for years. You can imagine how difficult it would be to put food on the table, pay for medicines, rent and clothe and care for their teenage son.”

To help the family, Hope House provided them with grocery store gift cards, money for some medications and paid for a water bill, all of which came from the Bishop’s Annual Appeal.

It’s situations like this, which Duffy and Silbernagel believe, now more than ever, make it important for people donate to the Appeal.

According to Silbernagel, almost weekly agencies have reductions in funding from the government and unfortunately have closed some of their programs such as the senior day programs in Sussex County due to lack of funding. In Paterson, the program was reduced to three days from five days a week. Silbernagel said, “The services we provide to these seniors are so valuable and important to them. The senior programs are part of their livelihood. Recently, more than 300 of the seniors signed a petition to continue to have it running five days a week.”

CFCS provides more than 25 different programs between its different divisions, some of which includes childcare centers, a group home for teenagers, immigration assistance, veterans services, disaster relief, counseling, foster parent program and English as a second language classes.

Duffy said, “In 2013, we provided more than 13,600 meals to almost 9,000 people each month. A third of which were children. We kept the lights and heat on last winter for 585 people. 1,249 folks avoided homelessness because we paid their rent. More than 800 men, women and adolescents received residential substance abuse treatment. There are 74 folks with intellectual and development disabilities, who are cared for and live in our group homes and 76 men and women live in our apartments for persons with HIV/AIDS. More than 7,000 seniors received meals on wheels, adult day care, chore services and transportation services. These and our other services are costly but save lives and give dignity.”

To donate to the Appeal, parishioners can provide financial support through one-time gifts or pledges paid over several months with reminders, credit card contributions or online contributions. Legacy gifts to the BAA can also be considered in will or estate plans.

Silbernagel said, “The reality is we are the only people that do what we do in the area. The resources and caring support that we give to people, there’s no other place like us.”

Visit www.2014appeal.org or call 973-777- 8818, ext. 215 for more information.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Bishop%E2%80%99s+Annual+Appeal+Helps+The+Most+Needy+Of+The+Diocese+In+Many+Ways/1850006/231362/article.html.

Former Wall St. Exec Examines Leadership Style Of Pope

Michael Wojcik

MADISON At first glance, these four separate everyday images may not seem to have much in common: a person doing laundry, monastery bells and a pair of dusty shoes and a colorful jacket (unless they are in the laundry). But together, these simple images paint a powerful picture of the strong, yet humble leadership style of Pope Francis. Catholics everywhere can model his faithfilled demonstrations of the authentic power of service; getting in touch with reality, while also taking time for reflection; and cultivating respect others.

That’s what Catholics — especially business leaders — learned from Chris Lowney, a former Jesuit seminarian and high-level executive for J. P. Morgan, who spoke about “Leading like Pope Francis: Lessons in Management” Oct. 20 at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. Since leaving J.P. Morgan in 2001, he has authored four books, including his latest, “Pope Francis: Why He Leads the Way He Leads — Lessons from the First Jesuit Pope,” which was the basis of his presentation, which filled the auditorium at St. Paul’s.

“Being a leader today means having to deal with more and more change and complexity. By definition, a leader must be able to point a way [forward] and influence other people,” said Lowney, chairman of the board of Catholic Heath Initiatives, a not-for-profit hospital / health care system. “What statement are we making as leaders? Do we cheat people or are we honest? We need good leadership and good habits of leadership. Pope Francis is a case study in that,” he said.

St. Paul’s also intended Lowney’s talk to help drum up interest in an Outreach to Business Professionals — a ministry to “help them integrate faith and life” — that the evangelization center has been developing, said Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization.

During his presentation, Lowney described how he gained a clearer picture of the pope’s leadership style by talking to priests, who studied at a Jesuit seminary that he founded outside of his home city in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he later served as archbishop. The author also examined acts of leadership that the pope — formerly Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio — has performed since being elected the leader of the universal Church on March 13, 2013. From then to now, Pope Francis’ way of leading has stayed consistent, Lowney said.

Flipping through a PowerPoint slide show, Lowney offered the audience — which included a large contingent of Sisters of Christian Charity from Assumption College in Mend ham — the following four images that illustrate Pope Francis’ leadership style:

• A person doing the laundry. While a priest in Argentina, Pope Francis established a seminary. Money was tight, so he told thE students that they would have to take on the household chores. The future pontiff led by example by assigning himself the first chore: doing the laundry, said Lowney, who delivers talks and conferences on leadership, decision- making and business ethics throughout the U.S. and abroad.

“This shows Cardinal Bergogio’s authentic power of service,” Lowney said. “Leadership is not all about authority. It’s about gaining the confidence and cooperation of your team. It’s about saying, ‘We all have to make sacrifices; I go first,’ ” he said.

Shortly after being elected shepherd of the universal Church, Pope Francis exercised his leadership in an exciting new way during Holy Week. Usually, popes have performed the ceremonial washing of people’s feet at the Cathedral of St. John Lateran in Rome. Instead, he performed the ritual at a local youth detention center, Lowney said.

“Pope Francis emphasized the authentic power of service. He got people to care and invest their time and talents in something larger than themselves [caring for the poor and marginalized],” Lowney said.

• Dusty shoes. As rector, Pope Francis assigned each seminarian with the task of ministering to his own designed section of the surrounding town. He noticed that the men who performed best were those who came back wearing dusty shoes. It showed that they walked all over and especially on unpaved — and uncharted — roads of the town, Lowney said.

“Leaders need to get out there and get in touch with reality. It’s not all about looking at spreadsheets or watching TV,” Lowney said.

• Monastery bells. As rector, Pope Francis rang the bells of the Jesuit seminary at the end of the workday that called all the seminarians into the chapel to pray. They would step back from the everyday to reflect: being grateful, lifting their horizons and reviewing their days, Lowney said.

“In the 21 century, we are present to everything, but not always to what is important. Cardinal Bergogio appreciated the chaos in life and its many distractions. We need disciples, who keep on track and focused on the most important things that they are on the Earth for,” said Lowney.

• A colorful jacket. Some of the students at the Jesuit seminary came from a poor, rural region of the Andes Mountains and proudly wore a colorful jacket of a striking design, native to the area. Some of the more privileged seminarians laughed at and looked down on these poor seminarians. So as rector, Pope Francis ordered those men displaying the rude behavior to wear the colorful jackets for a week, Lowney said.

“Cardinal Bergogio was asking these [rude] seminarians to think about the other person, who is worthy of dignity and respect,” Lowney said.

Following his talk, Lowney answered some questions and fielded comments from the audience on many topics. After, Angelo Sansano, a partner in the Henry O. Baker Insurance Group in Dover, told The Beacon that he related to the image in Lowney’s talk of Pope Francis showing leadership as seminary rector by assigning himself the menial, yet important, task of doing laundry — “whatever it takes to get the work done.”

Also, Sansano expressed hope in the Outreach to Business Professionals that he has been helping to establish at St. Paul’s.

“Many people in the business world go to Mass on Sunday, but want something more,” Sansano said. “I hope that this new outreach will be a place, where all of us in business, who have similar stresses, can come together to reflect and deepen our faith.”

[Information on the Outreach to Business Professionals, (973) 377-1004].

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Former+Wall+St.+Exec+Examines+Leadership+Style+Of+Pope/1850016/231362/article.html.

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