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The Beacon September 18, 2014 : Page 1

13 M A RI A N S HRINE, S TEPPING S TONE RO SA RY H A VE S TRONG FOLLOWING S SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS 9/18/2014 10 BI S HOP C ELEBR A TE S 4 M ASS WITH FILIPINO C OMMUNITY TO HONOR M A RTYR SA INT S Bishop’s Annual Appeal supports work of Catholic Charities agencies By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER A B LESSING F ROM THE B ISHOP 11 TEEN LE A D S W A Y TO NEW WEB S ITE FOR HOLY S PIRIT P A RI S H 6, 1 1 8-9 10 14-15 15 “Be An Ambassador for Christ” Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS O BITUARIES through the doors of Catholic Charities agencies in need of assistance. Sometimes it is for food to feed their family; at other times, they need help to overcome substance abuse or they are looking for support for a disabled adult. Under the theme “Be an Ambassador for Christ,” the 2014 Bishop’s Annual Appeal (BAA) helps to support diocesan Catholic Charities to fund the immediate and day-to-day op-erations of these agencies found in every county of the diocese. In the upcoming weeks, The Beacon will share stories in detail about the three agencies of diocesan Catholic Charities — Straight and Narrow Inc. (SN), Depart ment for Persons with Disabilities (DPD) and Cath olic Family and Com munity Services (CFCS) — and the important work they do helping society’s neediest. Bishop Serratelli said, “Our Catholic Charities in our diocese is known through the entire country. The outreach we have to the poor and needy has been a longstanding tradition. I think it’s a jewel in the crown of the Church of Paterson.” The largest percentage of Appeal funds each year is used BAA on 16 PATERSON Each year, tens of thousands of people step BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI At Our Lady of Fatima Church in Passaic, Bishop Serratelli was welcomed warmly by the parishioners during his pastoral visit Sept. 14. After he celebrated Mass for the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, parishioners surrounded the bishop and patiently waited for him to give a blessing to each of them. Story, more photos on page 12. DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS AB LESSED J ERSEY G IRL By MSGR. RAYMOND J. KUPKE Sister Miriam Teresa Demjanovich to join very select group of American Catholics men are currently among the beatified. Of that group of 14, Sister Miriam Teresa will be only the third (along with St. Elizabeth Ann Seton and St. Katherine Drexel) to have been born and lived her entire life in the United States. St. Kateri Tekakwitha was born in New York State, but lived part of her life and died in Canada. The others were all European-born missionaries to America. Sister Miriam Teresa will be the first of the group to have been born in the 20th century. Teresa Demjanovich was born in Bayonne on March 26, 1901, the daughter of Ruthenian Byzantine im-migrants from the picturesque town BLESSED JERSEY GIRL on 2 In 1988 the Vatican Congregation for the Causes of the Saints issued a special commemorative book, Index ac Status Causarum , to commemo-rate the 400th anniversary of the con-gregation. The Latin work lists every cause for beatification and canoniza-tion submitted to the Holy See since the creation of the old Congregation for Rites in 1588, as well as their 1988 status. It is a history of the modern process of canonization in the Catholic Church. In the back there is an Index diocesium listing alphabetically every diocese in the world with a case pend-ing in Rome. There, proudly, on page 482, between the seven causes of Patavinus (Padua, Italy) and the five causes submitted by Perusinus (Perugia, Italy) lies the single cause of Patersonensis , that of Sister Miriam Teresa Demjanovich, S.C., first for-mally submitted to Rome in 1980. On Dec. 17, 2013, Pope Francis gave his approval to the validity of a miracle experienced at her intercession in 1963, thus paving the way for her be-atification in Newark’s Sacred Heart Cathedral Basilica on Oct. 4. It will be an historic day for the Church in New Jersey, and in the United States. The ceremony will mark the first time the Rite of Beatification has been cel-ebrated in the United States. Prior to Pope Benedict XVI, most beatifica-tions, like canonizations, were cele-brated in Rome. (In 1988 Pope John Paul II originally planned to beatify the Spanish Franciscan missionary, Junipero Serra, during his visit to California. However, the potential of protests by those who see the evan-gelization efforts of the Spanish mis-sionaries among the Native Americans as cultural genocide prompted the Holy Father to postpone the beatifi-cation to later that year in Rome.) Sister Miriam Teresa joins a very select group. Only 12 Americans (five men and seven women) have been canonized, and only two American

Bishop’s Annual Appeal Supports Work Of Catholic Charities Agencies

Cecile San Agustin

PATERSON Each year, tens of thousands of people step through the doors of Catholic Charities agencies in need of assistance. Sometimes it is for food to feed their family; at other times, they need help to overcome substance abuse or they are looking for support for a disabled adult.

Under the theme “Be an Ambassador for Christ,” the 2014 Bishop’s Annual Appeal (BAA) helps to support diocesan Catholic Charities to fund the immediate and day-to-day operations of these agencies found in every county of the diocese. In the upcoming weeks, The Beacon will share stories in detail about the three agencies of diocesan Catholic Charities — Straight and Narrow Inc. (SN), Department for Persons with Disabilities (DPD) and Catholic Family and Community Services (CFCS) — and the important work they do helping society’s neediest.

Bishop Serratelli said, “Our Catholic Charities in our diocese is known through the entire country. The outreach we have to the poor and needy has been a longstanding tradition. I think it’s a jewel in the crown of the Church of Paterson.”

The largest percentage of Appeal funds each year is used to help Catholic Charities agencies do their essential work. Services provided by CFCS and its satellite agencies — Hispanic Information Center in Passaic, Hope House in Dover and Father English Center in Paterson — include emergency assistance for bills, housing and food; day care for children; immigration assistance; family counseling; veterans’ services; AIDS ministry; after school and summer programs and help for seniors. At Straight and Narrow, services provided are aimed mostly for the rehabilitation of those addicted to drugs and alcohol, which include residential and outpatient drug/alcohol counseling, medical detox, housing for persons with HIV/AIDS and community programs such as childcare and a family center. At DPD, services are provided to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities through group homes, an adult training center and spirituality programs.

Joe Duffy, president of diocesan Catholic Charities and executive director of Straight and Narrow, said, “I look forward to the Bishop’s Annual Appeal each year for three reasons. It gives me the opportunity to go to parishes and speak about Catholic Charities, something I welcome the opportunity to do. It gives me the opportunity to make our case for the vital importance of the donations in assuring we are there serving the poor and not turning them away; and it gives the folks in the pews the opportunity to share in our hands-on work being the face and hands of God to each of the almost 70,000 people that walk through our doors every year.”

For those interested in seeing the work of Catholic Charities firsthand the diocesan agencies invite the faithful to visit and spend time with the staff and clients.

In addition to diocesan Catholic Charities, the Appeal also supports diocesan seminarians, retired priests residing at Nazareth Village in Chester and the Catholic Academy of Passaic County, which serves a number of schools in and around the inner cities of Passaic and Paterson. Parish rebates will also be given to any parish that goes beyond its target goal.

To support the appeal during the weekend of Oct. 11-12, the In-Pew Commitment Weekend will take place to invite parishioners to make a pledge or donation. Parishioners can provide financial support to the 2014 BAA through onetime gifts or pledges paid over several months with reminders, credit card contributions or online contributions. Legacy gifts to the BAA can also be considered in will or estate plans.

Duffy said, “It is impossible to describe in a sentence or two all the good work that Catholic Charities provides and how important your Appeal gift is to people in need.”

[Information: www.2014appeal.org or (973) 777-8818, ext. 215.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Bishop%E2%80%99s+Annual+Appeal+Supports+Work+Of+Catholic+Charities+Agencies/1812778/225675/article.html.

A Blessed Jersey Girl

Msgr. Raymond J. Kupke

Sister Miriam Teresa Demjanovich to join very select group of American Catholics

In 1988 the Vatican Congregation for the Causes of the Saints issued a special commemorative book, Index ac Status Causarum, to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the congregation. The Latin work lists every cause for beatification and canonization submitted to the Holy See since the creation of the old Congregation for Rites in 1588, as well as their 1988 status. It is a history of the modern process of canonization in the Catholic Church. In the back there is an Index diocesium listing alphabetically every diocese in the world with a case pending in Rome. There, proudly, on page 482, between the seven causes of Patavinus (Padua, Italy) and the five causes submitted by Perusinus (Perugia, Italy) lies the single cause of Patersonensis, that of Sister Miriam Teresa Demjanovich, S.C., first formally submitted to Rome in 1980. On Dec. 17, 2013, Pope Francis gave his approval to the validity of a miracle experienced at her intercession in 1963, thus paving the way for her beatification in Newark’s Sacred Heart Cathedral Basilica on Oct. 4. It will be an historic day for the Church in New Jersey, and in the United States. The ceremony will mark the first time the Rite of Beatification has been celebrated in the United States. Prior to Pope Benedict XVI, most beatifications, like canonizations, were celebrated in Rome. (In 1988 Pope John Paul II originally planned to beatify the Spanish Franciscan missionary, Junipero Serra, during his visit to California. However, the potential of protests by those who see the evangelization efforts of the Spanish missionaries among the Native Americans as cultural genocide prompted the Holy Father to postpone the beatification to later that year in Rome.)

Sister Miriam Teresa joins a very select group. Only 12 Americans (five men and seven women) have been canonized, and only two American men are currently among the beatified. Of that group of 14, Sister Miriam Teresa will be only the third (along with St. Elizabeth Ann Seton and St. Katherine Drexel) to have been born and lived her entire life in the United States. St. Kateri Tekakwitha was born in New York State, but lived part of her life and died in Canada. The others were all European-born missionaries to America. Sister Miriam Teresa will be the first of the group to have been born in the 20th century.

Teresa Demjanovich was born in Bayonne on March 26, 1901, the daughter of Ruthenian Byzantine immigrants from the picturesque town of Bardejov in modern Slovakia. Known to her friends as “Treat,” she lived out her all-too-brief life entirely in Hudson and Morris Counties. After graduating second in her class at Bayonne High School in 1917, she studied at the College of St. Elizabeth in Convent Station, graduating in 1923 with highest honors in English literature. The next two years were marked by family obligations (her widowed father died in January 1925) and vocational discernment — she was rejected by a contemplative Carmelite community in The Bronx, N.Y. Two weeks after her father’s death she entered the Sisters of Charity of St. Elizabeth and was clothed with the habit on May 17, 1925, the same day that her namesake, Therese of Lisieux, was canonized in Rome. Just two years later on May 8, 1927, she died of acute appendicitis, after making her final vows on her deathbed.

Like the Little Flower, her brief life was marked by a very intense spirituality. This was recognized by her confessor, Benedictine Father Benedict Bradley, who asked her to write down the conferences he would give to the sisters. On the day of her death, Father Bradley revealed to the other sisters that his conferences had been written by Sister Miriam Teresa and assured them they had lost “a saint.” Her brother, Father Charles Demjanovich, asked his friend, Msgr. Thomas McLaughlin, the president of Seton Hall College, to celebrate the funeral Mass. Thus, the future first Bishop of Paterson presided at Convent Station, in what would later be the Diocese of Paterson, at the funeral of Paterson’s future beata. McLaughlin and Bradley were so struck by her holiness that they agreed that the text for her funeral Mass should come from the Mass Dilexisti for a “holy virgin not a martyr.” In the evening of the day of the funeral, McLaughlin, with great foresight, wrote down:

“My prayer is that the departed one may in conformity with the divine will intercede for me and for those entrusted to my care; that if it be the Will of God, her life and virtues may become known, that they may be a source of edification to her sisters in religion; and also effect the harmonious interaction of the different rites of the Church, particularly here in America.”

• • •

In 1928, the conferences she wrote were gathered together and first published under the title, “Greater Prefection.” In December 1945 Bishop McLaughlin opened the diocesan phase of her cause for beatification and canonization. In May 1979, under the supervision of Msgr. Herbert Tillyer, then serving as diocesan Vicar General, her remains were exhumed, examined and transferred from the sisters’ cemetery to a vault in Holy Family Chapel at Convent Station, preparatory to the formal introduction of her cause at Rome in June 1980.

Because Sister Miriam Teresa was a lifelong “Jersey Girl,” who lived out her call to holiness on the highways and byways of the Garden State, she becomes the patron of a number of unlikely categories of New Jersey Catholics:

• Those of mixed ritual background — she was a member of the Ruthenian Catholic Church in a Roman Catholic religious congregation;

• Public high school students — Bayonne High School Class of 1917;

• High school English teachers — she taught at the Academy of St. Aloysius in Jersey City and the Academy of St. Elizabeth in Convent Station;

• New Jersey commuters to Manhattan — she liked to take the train into the city with her friends;

• New Jersey female athletes — she ran track for three years;

• New Jersey opticians and ophthalmologists — she was treated for very poor eyesight her whole life, and her miracle was the cure of a young boy suffering from macular degeneration;

• New Jersey shoppers — she liked shopping with her friends, especially in New York City.

But, most of all, in a state too often defined by the denizens The Sopranos, Jersey Shore, and The Housewives of New Jersey, her beatification reminds us, in bold relief, that the vocation to holiness is a genuine possibility in New Jersey.

[Msgr. Raymond J. Kupke, pastor of St. Anthony Parish in Hawthorne, is the diocesan archivist.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/A+Blessed+Jersey+Girl/1812780/225675/article.html.

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