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The Beacon September 4, 2014 : Page 1

3 BI S HOP CA LL S FOR PR A YER S FOR THO S E PER S E C UTED IN THE MIDDLE E AS T SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS 9/4/2014 V OLLEYING FOR V OCATIONS 1 1 6 BI S HOP M A KE S P AS TOR A L VI S IT S TO BR A N C HVILLE, S TO C KHOLM P A RI S HE S 2014 Bishop’s Annual Appeal kicks off this weekend in all parishes ‘Be an Ambassador for Christ’ By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER CLIFTON This weekend, the 2014 BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI DIO C E SA N SC HOOL S A NNU A L REPORT FOR THE 201314 SC HOOL YE A R 11 W HAT T O D O 12-13 V IEWPOINT 14-15 C LASSIFIED DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS 7-10 Newer religious women and men serving in the diocese join Father Kevin Corcoran (back left) in a game of volleyball on the grounds of the Quellen Center at the motherhouse of the Sisters of Christian Charity in Mendham Aug. 28 after gathering with Bishop Serratelli for Mass and a picnic. For story and more photos, turn to page 5. Bishop’s Annual Appeal (BAA) kicks off at Masses in parishes across the diocese to support diocesan ministries. Under the theme, “Be an Ambassador for Christ,” the appeal invites parish-ioners to help with the day-to-day op-erational funding that assists the poor, the sick and the needy; inner-city el-ementary school students; seminari-ans and retired priests. To prepare for the 2014 BAA, pas-tors, priests and lay appeal chairper-sons came to a kick-off meeting with Bishop Serratelli Aug. 26 at the St. John Paul II Center here. Through the generosity of the faithful, the 2014 BAA will support the ministries of diocesan Catholic Charities agencies, schools that comprise the Catholic Academy of Passaic County, seminar-ian education and Nazareth Village, the diocesan priests’ retirement resi-dence. “Literally, tens of thousands of peo-ple are helped each year because of those who participate in the Annual Appeal,” said Bishop Serratelli. “The extent of our ability to give a helping hand is dependent on the charity of our parishioners who make a pledge. Therefore, I ask every parish family to prayerfully consider a gift to the 2014 Bishop’s Annual Appeal. I pray that everyone will be able to contribute something that will bring the light of Christ to our brothers and sisters who look to us for love and compassion.” For the next few months, bulletin announcements will be made for BAA on 2 Chatham couple successfully lobbies for CPR training in schools By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR CHATHAM It’s has been a whirlwind few months for David and JoAnne Babbitt. The parishioners of St. Patrick’s here, received two awards and a scored a legislative victory at the State level — all related to their efforts to prevent sudden cardiac death after the unexpected and tragic loss of their 16-year-old son, John Taylor Babbitt, in 2006 from an un-diagnosed genetic heart condition. On Aug. 20, Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno, acting governor, while Gov. Christine was out of state, signed a law in Burlington that requires that all public and charter high school students re-ceive training during health classes in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and on Automated External Defibril -lators, known at AEDs. The measure passed both the Assembly and Senate earlier this year. Joann Babbitt under-took a spirited lobbying campaign that included her testimony before state lawmakers, with help from students of Chatham High School. On June 24, the Chatham Jaycees presented its Distinguished Service Award 2014 to the Babbitts for the work with the John Taylor Babbitt Foundation, which they established in John Taylor’s name. The non-profit organization works promote greater access of AEDs in public places and more training in CPR and the delib-erators. Also recently, Fortune maga-zine named David Babbitt, managing director of business development of global markets at BNY Mellon in New York City, one of its Heroes of the 500 of 2014 to recognize the work of the foundation. “It was an honor to receive these awards. Any way to get the word out about getting more AEDs in pubic places is great,” said David Babbitt, the foundation’s president, while his wife, JoAnne, is its vice president. “That last few months have been great, but also have been bittersweet. It’s also been sad [as they continue to mourn the loss of their son], but we know he would be happy. We are humbled, re-ceiving these awards,” she said. The foundation also helped lobby for the successful passage of N.J.’s Good Samaritan Law, which shields people from liability, when they op-erate AEDs to help people in distress. Many schools and municipalities hes-itate to install the machines for fear of liability issues, JoAnne Babbitt said. The goals of the foundation in-clude: installing defibrillators in schools, athletic venues and public gathering places; proposing legislation and lobbying for state-level laws on defibrillators; working on municipal policies and procedures to support the purchase and maintenance of defib-rillators; sponsoring local training pro-grams in CPR/AED; establishing JTB Heart Clubs in high schools and uni-versities to raise awareness and save lives; and supporting research on ge-netic cardiac disorders that increase risk of sudden cardiac death. The foundation hosts two annual fundrais-ers for its ambitious efforts, JoAnne Babbitt said. Meanwhile, on the local level, JTB The Heart Clubs partner with the school nurse, athletics department and administration to raise awareness and raise funds to purchase AEDs, which cost $1,400 to $1,700 each and install CPR on 4

2014 Bishop’s Annual Appeal Kicks Off This Weekend In All Parishes

Cecile San Agustin

‘Be an Ambassador for Christ’

CLIFTON This weekend, the 2014 Bishop’s Annual Appeal (BAA) kicks off at Masses in parishes across the diocese to support diocesan ministries. Under the theme, “Be an Ambassador for Christ,” the appeal invites parishioners to help with the day-to-day operational funding that assists the poor, the sick and the needy; inner-city elementary school students; seminarians and retired priests.

To prepare for the 2014 BAA, pastors, priests and lay appeal chairpersons came to a kick-off meeting with Bishop Serratelli Aug. 26 at the St. John Paul II Center here. Through the generosity of the faithful, the 2014 BAA will support the ministries of diocesan Catholic Charities agencies, schools that comprise the Catholic Academy of Passaic County, seminarian education and Nazareth Village, the diocesan priests’ retirement residence.

“Literally, tens of thousands of people are helped each year because of those who participate in the Annual Appeal,” said Bishop Serratelli. “The extent of our ability to give a helping hand is dependent on the charity of our parishioners who make a pledge.Therefore, I ask every parish family to prayerfully consider a gift to the 2014 Bishop’s Annual Appeal. I pray that everyone will be able to contribute something that will bring the light of Christ to our brothers and sisters who look to us for love and compassion.”

For the next few months, bulletin announcements will be made for Parishioners to understand more about the appeal and during weekend Masses of Oct. 11- 12, the In-Pew Commitment Weekend will take place to invite parishioners to make a pledge or donation. During Masses, parishioners will learn about the appeal and have an opportunity to be part of supporting the appeal.

Following the overwhelming response and success of Partners in Faith, the diocesan capital and endowment campaign, Bishop Serratelli thanked pastors and lay appeal chairpersons during the kick-off meeting. The Partners in Faith campaign raised funds for ministries outside the diocese’s general annual operating funds and included some endowments with an eye toward future needs. The BAA on the other hand, helps fund immediate, day-to-day operations of four important ministries and programs: Catholic Charities, seminarian education, our diocesan priests’ retirement residence and inner-city area schools that comprise of the Catholic Academy of Passaic County.

Tim Potter, diocesan director of development, said, “When we talk about Partners in Faith funding specific ministries and projects outside the diocesan budget, and the Annual Appeal helping with the day-to-day operations of four distinct programs, we can think of it in local terms. For instance, if a parish were to conduct a major capital campaign for a church addition or a new parish center, it would not stop the weekly Sunday collection because that is needed to fund the vital, everyday work of a parish. The same can be applied to our diocese, where the appeal is distinct from Partners in Faith because the appeal funds the critical work that touches the lives of so many people daily.”

“This is an important year for our diocese in terms of the service that we are called to provide to people throughout Morris, Passaic and Sussex counties” said Msgr. James Mahoney, diocesan vicar general, moderator of the Curia and pastor of Corpus Christi Parish in Chatham Township. “With the resumption of the Bishop’s Annual Appeal this fall, after being included in the Partners in Faith campaign last year, it is important that our parishioners know why both fund drives are different and why both are important. I am confident that, after learning the distinctions between Partners in Faith and our Bishop’s Annual Appeal, they will respond with their characteristic generosity.”

The majority of the funds raised for the BAA will help support diocesan Catholic Charities agencies. Each year, diocesan agencies provide help to tens of thousands of people in need. Services provided include day care and extended care for children, transportation services for seniors and the disabled, family counseling, emergency food banks, group homes for adults with disabilities, AIDS ministry, clothing and food pantries, substance abuse counseling and home repairs for seniors.

In addition to these agencies, the appeal will provide a significant portion of funding to the Catholic Academy of Passaic County, which serves a number of schools in the inner-city area.

Also, the appeal helps funds education for diocesan seminarians and Nazareth Village, the diocesan priests’ retirement residence in Chester. This is especially important since the number of seminarians has increased dramatically in recent years, along with the cost of formation. The appeal helps both these groups of men: those who are preparing for a lifetime of service to the Church and those who have faithful served for decades.

Similar to appeals in the past, parish rebates will be given to parishes that raise funds over their appeal goal. Half the amount received over a parish goal is returned to parishes for their own needs.

Msgr. Mahoney said, “As a pastor, I see constantly just how generous the parishioners of this diocese are when asked to support the work of our diocese. It is a wonderful testament to their faith and goodness, especially in helping those in spiritual and physical need.”

To provide financial support to the 2014 BAA, there are several ways to help. (1) Onetime gifts or pledges paid over several months with reminders, (2) credit card contributions, (3) on-line contributions. Legacy gifts to the BAA can also be considered in will or estate plans.

“Whenever I visit our parishes, schools, Catholic Charities agencies, or meet with our senior priests or seminarians, I am constantly reminded about the goodness of the people of the Paterson Diocese for their ongoing support of our Bishop’s Annual Appeal,” said Bishop Serratelli. “I wish everyone could see firsthand the work of our Diocese — especially as it relates to our Catholic Charities agencies. They would see so much great work being done in their name.”

[Information, visit www.patersondiocese.org or call (973) 777-8818, ext. 215.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/2014+Bishop%E2%80%99s+Annual+Appeal+Kicks+Off+This+Weekend+In+All+Parishes/1803201/223866/article.html.

Chatham Couple Successfully Lobbies For CPR Training In Schools

Michael Wojcik

CHATHAM It’s has been a whirlwind few months for David and JoAnne Babbitt. The parishioners of St. Patrick’s here, received two awards and a scored a legislative victory at the State level — all related to their efforts to prevent sudden cardiac death after the unexpected and tragic loss of their 16-year-old son, John Taylor Babbitt, in 2006 from an undiagnosed genetic heart condition.

On Aug. 20, Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno, acting governor, while Gov. Christine was out of state, signed a law in Burlington that requires that all public and charter high school students receive training during health classes in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and on Automated External Defibril - lators, known at AEDs. The measure passed both the Assembly and Senate earlier this year. Joann Babbitt undertook a spirited lobbying campaign that included her testimony before state lawmakers, with help from students of Chatham High School.

On June 24, the Chatham Jaycees presented its Distinguished Service Award 2014 to the Babbitts for the work with the John Taylor Babbitt Foundation, which they established in John Taylor’s name. The non-profit organization works promote greater access of AEDs in public places and more training in CPR and the deliberators. Also recently, Fortune magazine named David Babbitt, managing director of business development of global markets at BNY Mellon in New York City, one of its Heroes of the 500 of 2014 to recognize the work of the foundation.

“It was an honor to receive these awards. Any way to get the word out about getting more AEDs in pubic places is great,” said David Babbitt, the foundation’s president, while his wife, JoAnne, is its vice president. “That last few months have been great, but also have been bittersweet. It’s also been sad [as they continue to mourn the loss of their son], but we know he would be happy. We are humbled, receiving these awards,” she said.

The foundation also helped lobby for the successful passage of N.J.’s Good Samaritan Law, which shields people from liability, when they operate AEDs to help people in distress. Many schools and municipalities hesitate to install the machines for fear of liability issues, JoAnne Babbitt said.

The goals of the foundation include: installing defibrillators in schools, athletic venues and public gathering places; proposing legislation and lobbying for state-level laws on defibrillators; working on municipal policies and procedures to support the purchase and maintenance of defibrillators; sponsoring local training programs in CPR/AED; establishing JTB Heart Clubs in high schools and universities to raise awareness and save lives; and supporting research on genetic cardiac disorders that increase risk of sudden cardiac death. The foundation hosts two annual fundraisers for its ambitious efforts, JoAnne Babbitt said.

Meanwhile, on the local level, JTB The Heart Clubs partner with the school nurse, athletics department and administration to raise awareness and raise funds to purchase AEDs, which cost $1,400 to $1,700 each and install them in common areas on campus, she said.

“If a person receives treatment in five minutes, there is a 70 percent chance of survival, but only five percent after that,” said David Babbitt, who noted that AEDs are so simple to operate that even an 11-year-old can safely use the machine by following its instructions — all without receiving a shock.

John Taylor always has been the inspiration for the non-profit foundation, which they established after his death of sudden cardiac arrest, while he was playing basketball in St. Patrick’s school gym. The autopsy revealed that this athletic and otherwise healthy teen-ager died from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). A part of the heart muscle thickened without an obvious cause. Younger people end up having a more severe form of this symptomless condition, which accounts for 40 percent of all the sudden cardiac deaths, JoAnne Babbitt said.

After John Taylor’s death in 2006, the Babbitts started the foundation, bolstered by the strength they received from their Catholic faith and from the love and concern of the St. Patrick and Chatham communities, David Babbitt said.

“We wanted to do anything we could to prevent other families from going through what we did,” JoAnne Babbitt said. “You think that your life is going to run normally, some days better than others, but you never think that your whole life will be changed in a minute. The pain of losing a child is something you cannot describe.”

At St. Patrick’s, both Babbitts — parents of another son, 23-year-old Andrew — serve as extraordinary ministers of the Holy Communion and have helped out a various events at the Morris County parish. JoAnne also served on the parish council.

“Our Catholic faith and support from St. Pat’s and the local community have helped us in doing what we’re doing now — making a difference. They have given us the ability to keep moving forward,” David Babbitt said. “This journey [grieving their son’s death] has been a journey in our Catholic faith. We realize that our time on Earth is not all there is. We will be able to see John again,” he said.

[Information about the John Taylor Babbitt Foundation, go to http://www.jtbfoundation.org or call (973) 722-1212.]

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Chatham+Couple+Successfully+Lobbies+For+CPR+Training+In+Schools/1803223/223866/article.html.

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