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The Beacon August 14 2014 : Page 1

Outreach, training programs listed for center Spiritual road trip through the diocese 7 N EWSPAPER OF THE D IOCESE OF P ATERSON , N. J. > N O . 30 V OL . 48 > A UGUST 14, 2014 5 I NTERNING A T L IFENET Two college students from parishes in Chatham and Stockholm help Lifenet promote Respect for Life By MICHAEL WOJCIK News Editor NEWARK — This summer, two col-lege students from parishes in the Paterson Diocese — both already deeply committed to the pro-life cause— learned to strengthen their voices even more in support of Respect for Life as interns for the pro-life education and advocacy or-ganization Lifenet, based in the Newark Archdiocese. Interning at Lifenet are Elizabeth Wakuluk, 21, of St. John Vianney Parish, Stockholm, who is a senior at Mount St. Mary’s College, Emmitsburg, Md., and Mary Ames, 20, of St. Patrick Parish, Chatham, who is a junior at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh. The internship with Lifenet has giv-en these interns more information and helped them sharpen their communication skills to promote Respect for Life issues even more articulately to all people, but espe-cially to the younger generations. Their internships ended this month, said Chris Flaherty, executive direc-tor of Lifenet, headquartered in the Newark Archdiocesan Center here. “Mary and Elizabeth have been See Interning on Page 3 BREAKING BREAD AT COLLEGE — Assumption College for Sisters (ACS) prepares to begin a new school year with orientation set for Aug. 26. The college began as a school for young Sisters of Christian Charity. Today, ACS educates religious sisters from around the world. Pictured above are sister-students preparing a dinner of ethnic dishes for last year’s graduation along with making bread for the meal. O NE -O F -A-K IND C OLLEGE Assumption College gets ready for new school year educating religious sisters from around the world By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN Reporter MENDHAM — Assumption College for Sisters (ACS) here is like no oth-er college. Its unique mission, which sets it apart from colleges all around the world, is to educate religious sisters called to a conse-crated life. Courses at this one-of-a-kind ed-Pro-life passion intensifies with birth of Down Syndrome sister CHATHAM — Mary Ames of St. Patrick Parish here always consid-ered herself pro-life — a strong conviction shaped by her deep Catholic faith, her devout parents and her large family, which in-cludes six other siblings. Then, nine years ago, along came the youngest child, a sister named Grace, who has Down Syndrome. “After Gracie was born, I be-came more passionate about the pro-life cause. The thought that someone would want to get rid of her gets me upset. Gracie always makes me smile and says the darnedest things,” Ames said, who anticipates earning a bachelor’s de-gree in health sciences at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, in 2016 and a master’s degree in occupational therapy in 2017. In part, Ames’ strong pro-life commitment finds its roots in her See Passion on Page 3 Taking to the streets with pro-life message as part of Lifenet STOCKHOLM — Elizabeth Wakuluk of St. John Vianney Parish here learned how to take the pro-life message to the streets this summer, when she and other Lifenet sup-porters stood on street corners in Newark outside N.J. Institute of Technology and Rutgers University as part of the Face the Truth cam-paign. There, Wakuluk and the rest of Lifenet promoted Respect for Life by displaying posters that featured graphic photographs of abortions and starting conversations with passersby. As expected, the group received “many positive reactions,” she said. “Some people were not thrilled that we were there and made it clear,” said Wakuluk, who is purs-ing a bachelor’s degree in theolo-gy at Mount St. Mary’s in Mary -land. “But some people approached See Message on Page 3 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS ucational institution are similar to a typical undergraduate college, with classes in the humanities, fine arts, history, mathematics and so-cial sciences. That’s because when the Sisters of Christian Charity formed, Blessed Pauline von Mallinckrodt, founder of the order, required religious sisters to become as qualified professionally as their contemporary lay counterparts. Blessed Pauline’s tradition con-tinues more than 160 years later at ACS, where presently nearly 50 sisters and lay students are study-ing. Religious sisters will receive an associate’s degree upon completion of two to three years of study while lay students receive college credits, mostly in theology or philosophy. Another unique feature of the stu-dent body is the blending of inter-national religious women who study at ACS. During the past 15 years, more than 250 students from 22 countries and five continents, representing 32 religious commu-nities studied at the school. “Our mission is to ‘teach a sis-ter, touch the world’ because we are literally reaching out to the world,” said Sister of Christian Charity Joseph Spring, president of the college. “We educate these sis-ters so they can eventually return to their home countries and spread the Gospel to the people back in their homeland.” Because home is so far away for these sisters, they reside in a “dor-and I found sisters here. We are from different communities and speak different languages, but we all have the same mission to serve God. ” B ENE M ARIA S ISTER F IDES N IJIMBERE OF B URUNDI mitory” setting at the Mallinckrodt Convent, Motherhouse of the Sisters of Christian Charity, where they are able to experience living in a religious community. Also, for the international sister-students at Assumption, the first year is dedi-cated to learning the English lan-guage. Some first languages spo-See One-of-a-kind on Page 2 “ I found community Mary Ames Elizabeth Wakuluk W HAT T O D O Y OUTH V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS O BITUARIES 5 6 8-9 10-11 12

One-Of-A-Kind College

Cecile San Agustin

Assumption College gets ready for new school year educating religious sisters from around the world

MENDHAM — Assumption College for Sisters (ACS) here is like no other college. Its unique mission, which sets it apart from colleges all around the world, is to educate religious sisters called to a consecrated life.

Courses at this one-of-a-kind educational institution are similar to a typical undergraduate college, with classes in the humanities, fine arts, history, mathematics and social sciences. That’s because when the Sisters of Christian Charity formed, Blessed Pauline von Mallinckrodt, founder of the order, required religious sisters to become as qualified professionally as their contemporary lay counterparts.

Blessed Pauline’s tradition continues more than 160 years later at ACS, where presently nearly 50 sisters and lay students are studying. Religious sisters will receive an associate’s degree upon completion of two to three years of study while lay students receive college credits, mostly in theology or philosophy. Another unique feature of the student body is the blending of international religious women who study at ACS. During the past 15 years, more than 250 students from 22 countries and five continents, representing 32 religious communities studied at the school.

“Our mission is to ‘teach a sister, touch the world’ because we are literally reaching out to the world,” said Sister of Christian Charity Joseph Spring, president of the college. “We educate these sisters so they can eventually return to their home countries and spread the Gospel to the people back in their homeland.”

Because home is so far away for these sisters, they reside in a “dormitory” setting at the Mallinckrodt Convent, Motherhouse of the Sisters of Christian Charity, where they are able to experience living in a religious community. Also, for the international sister-students at Assumption, the first year is dedicated to learning the English language. Some first languages spoKen by the sisters include Swahili, Vietnamese, Spanish and French.

Oblate Sister Cesilia Martinez-Zoto of El Salvador, a second year student at ACS, said, “I’ve learned many things about religious life, community and sharing with other cultures at Assumption. Being around so many different cultures will be helpful in my order’s mission work around the world.”

The South American sister added, “Assumption College also gave me the chance to meet so many women from different congregations.”

Hailing from the continent of Africa, Franciscan Sister Florentina Mapambano of Tanzania, said, “I feel good being here. At first, it was difficult because of the language but once I began to understand more it became easier. I learned my mission is to serve everyone and Assumption has allowed me to be aware of what is going on in the world and in the Church. Also, the saints we learn about help us understand our mission.” Sister Joseph recalled meeting many of the sisters for the first time. “I remember picking them up at the airport and the scared look they have on their faces because here they are at this strange place — now they have big smiles!”

Bene Maria Sister Alice Seshahu of Burundi, said, “I’m glad I came here to study in the United States. It’s a wonderful place.”

For decades ACS was the place to educate Sisters of Christian Charity, but in 1996, the college was opened up to women religious of other orders. Today, sisters come from the following orders: Bene Maria Sisters; Benedictine Sisters of Our Lady Help of Christians; Congregation of the Lovers of the Holy Cross; Daughters of Mary, Daughters of Mary Help of Christians; Daughters of Our Lady of the Holy Rosary; Daughters of Our Lady of the Visitation; Missionary Sisters of the Precious Blood; Oblates of Mother of Orphans, Sisters of Christian Charity and Sisters of Divine Vocation.

Our Lady of the Visitation Sister Maria Tram Phan of Vietnam, said, “I love it here. The Sisters of Christian Charity really take care of us. They are wonderful.”

It’s through generous friends and donors to the Sisters of Christian Charity and Assumption College that scholarships are made available for the education of these young women. The college also hosts an annual fundraiser, the Caring Basket Gala, every spring to benefit the sister-students.

This year, five new sisters from far-way lands will be beginning studies at Assumption College. Orientation will be on Aug. 26. In addition to the international sisters, religious sisters already with degrees will be studying to earn a certificate in theology.

“I found community and I found sisters here. We are from different communities and speak different languages, but we all have the same mission to serve God,” said Bene Maria Sister Fides Nijimbere of Burundi.

Information: www.acs350.org

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/One-Of-A-Kind+College/1784348/221193/article.html.

Interning At Lifenet

Michael Wojcik

Two college students from parishes in Chatham and Stockholm help Lifenet promote Respect for Life

NEWARK — This summer, two college students from parishes in the Paterson Diocese — both already deeply committed to the pro-life cause— learned to strengthen their voices even more in support of Respect for Life as interns for the pro-life education and advocacy organization Lifenet, based in the Newark Archdiocese.

Interning at Lifenet are Elizabeth Wakuluk, 21, of St. John Vianney Parish, Stockholm, who is a senior at Mount St. Mary’s College, Emmitsburg, Md., and Mary Ames, 20, of St. Patrick Parish, Chatham, who is a junior at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh. The internship with Lifenet has given these interns more information and helped them sharpen their communication skills to promote Respect for Life issues even more articulately to all people, but especially to the younger generations. Their internships ended this month, said Chris Flaherty, executive director of Lifenet, headquartered in the Newark Archdiocesan Center here.

“Mary and Elizabeth have been so helpful. They both have fabulous and beautiful hearts. In addition to them helping us, we at Lifenet hope that we are helping to form them [even more deeply in the pro-life cause],” said Flaherty, who added that the organization is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year.

Lifenet educates New Jersey communities about the “humanity of the unborn child, abortion and other bioethical issues.” It also seeks to empower young people “with critical information on human sexuality and sexually transmitted diseases and an invitation to set the highest personal standards” and makes “age-appropriate presentations to schools, youth groups, churches and civic organizations on the topics of abortion, stem cell research and abstinence,” according to Lifenet’s website, lifeneteducation.org.

“Both Mary and Elizabeth have been assets to our organization. I hope they both come back next summer,” Flaherty said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Interning+At+Lifenet/1784356/221193/article.html.

Pro-Life Passion Intensifies With Birth Of Down Syndrome Sister

CHATHAM — Mary Ames of St. Patrick Parish here always considered herself pro-life — a strong conviction shaped by her deep Catholic faith, her devout parents and her large family, which includes six other siblings. Then, nine years ago, along came the youngest child, a sister named Grace, who has Down Syndrome.

“After Gracie was born, I became more passionate about the pro-life cause. The thought that someone would want to get rid of her gets me upset. Gracie always makes me smile and says the darnedest things,” Ames said, who anticipates earning a bachelor’s degree in health sciences at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, in 2016 and a master’s degree in occupational therapy in 2017.

In part, Ames’ strong pro-life commitment finds its roots in her regular Mass attendance, which instilled her with critical values that “I later realized made a lot of sense, so I applied them to my life,” she said. Ames first got a taste for service as an altar server and as a member of the Builder’s Club at St. Patrick’s.

Ames attended Mount St. Mary Academy, Watchung, where she got involved in the pro-life club. The group attended the March for Life in Washington, put up posters in the school to educate their fellow students about life issues and worked with Teen Outreach in the Metuchen Diocese, which produces skits on prolife topics, aimed at middle school students, Ames said.

At Duquesne, Ames continues exercising her faith as a member of a pro-life group, called Consistent Ethic of Life. This past year, she led some members in researching U.S. Congres - sional and Senate bills related to life issues and then writing their lawmakers about them.

“I enjoyed the research. I’m good at arguing the facts, but I’m not as up on it as I should be. This work puts together two things I like: the facts [of the pro-life cause] and debating,” said Ames, who over the past two years, traveled with students from Duquesne and another Catholic colleges to the March for Life and who also promotes the campus pro-life group by posting flyers on campus. “Some students support us. Some rip down the posters and argue with us. It [Respect for Life] is not an easy topic to support,” she said.

This summer at Lifenet, Ames organized dozens of photographs of staffers and volunteers speaking and participating at in various pro-life activities that will be used to decorate the walls of Lifenet’s office. Ames and Wakuluk both attended an anti-pornography talk, Flaherty said.

Along with Wakuluk, Ames also stood with other Lifenet supporters on street corners in Newark outside as part of the Face the Truth campaign. She called part of the experience “nerve wracking.”

“Some people did not want us to be there. But some drove by, noticed the signs and what we were trying to say and gave us looks [of approval] or honked their horns,” Ames said. “We were making a difference.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Pro-Life+Passion+Intensifies+With+Birth+Of+Down+Syndrome+Sister/1784359/221193/article.html.

Taking To The Streets With Prolife Message As Part Of Lifenet

STOCKHOLM — Elizabeth Wakuluk of St. John Vianney Parish here learned how to take the pro-life message to the streets this summer, when she and other Lifenet supporters stood on street corners in Newark outside N.J. Institute of Technology and Rutgers University as part of the Face the Truth campaign.

There, Wakuluk and the rest of Lifenet promoted Respect for Life by displaying posters that featured graphic photographs of abortions and starting conversations with passersby. As expected, the group received “many positive reactions,” she said.

“Some people were not thrilled that we were there and made it clear,” said Wakuluk, who is pursing a bachelor’s degree in theology at Mount St. Mary’s in Mary - land. “But some people approached us and gave us their emails, because they wanted to get involved. Sometimes, we engaged people in great conversation. Sometimes, we promoted what abortion does — kill babies — with our silence and by not arguing,” she said.

Now, Wakuluk said that her Lifenet internship as “has given me the language to defend the truth and what we believe as Christians.”

“I feel more equipped to promote life — this most important message that our society is not on board with now,” said Wakuluk, who got involved with Lifenet last summer.

Wakuluk delivered a chastity witness for True Love Waits program that includes five nights of presentations and ends with a Mass and the opportunity to commit to a purity pledge and receive a purity ring, she said.

This summer Wakuluk helped Lifenet with plans for its 20th anniversary gala in December and updated a talk on chastity, based on information that she and Flaherty learned by attending the International Theology of the Body Congress held July 9-11 in Philadelphia.

“True Loves Waits is giving young people an understanding of sex, love and marriage, which can fulfill us and build up the Church and the world,” Wakuluk said.

At Mount St. Mary’s, Wakuluk has tutored students in theology and has been active in its Catholic Campus Ministry, serving as a sacristan. Her involvement at college builds on the strong faith formation of her “very Catholic family”; her getting active at St. John Vianney, where she served as a retreat leader; and her attending World Youth Day in Madrid, Spain, in 2011.

“It was amazing to visit to be in the holy places of Fatima and Avila. To be in the presence of the Holy Father [then Pope Benedict XVI] was a once-in-a-lifetime experience,” Wakuluk said. “To see so many Catholics from around the world really shows the universality of the Church.”

After, college, Wakuluk plans to put her faith in action once again by working in the field of religious education.

“Lifenet is an amazing organization,” Wakuluk said. “I am hopeful that, with organizations like Lifenet, young people become dedicated and passionate to the cause of Respect for Life. Lifenet is saving babies and is a beacon of God’s truth,” she said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Taking+To+The+Streets+With+Prolife+Message+As+Part+Of+Lifenet/1784364/221193/article.html.

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