Background Image

The Beacon July 31 2014 : Page 1

Outreach, training programs listed for center St. Matthew teens go on mission trip 6 N EWSPAPER OF THE D IOCESE OF P ATERSON , N. J. N O . 28 V OL . 48 > J ULY 31, 2014 > 5 G REEN T HUMBS IN THE C ITY Women at Passaic Neighborhood Center gain sense of pride as their garden grows to provide fresh food for their families By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN Reporter PASSAIC — Passaic City Hall tow-ers nearby. On another corner is a school, a car mechanic’s shop and a doctor’s office. All these build-ings are classic scenes in an urban neighborhood. But a garden right in the mid-dle of it all? That may seem like an anomaly to most who live in this city, but amazing things like this are happen-ing at Passaic Neighborhood Center for Women at St. Nicholas rectory here — among them a garden with vegetables and herbs yielding plen-tiful food for families in the inner-city this summer. A group of women, some who have never gardened before, tend to the crops made possible by City Green Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to establishing urban GARDEN PARTY — Marcella Guevara, Ermalinda Garcia, Sister of Christian Charity Mary Irene Sorber and Ana Estrada show off some of the day’s harvest in the garden at the Passaic Neighborhood Center for Women. Beacon photo / Cecile San Agustin farms and gardens in northern New Jersey. Its mission is to enrich the lives of inner city residents while cul-tivating education in public health, nutrition and the environment. Jamilah Dupree, a Passaic resi-dent who visits the center, thinks the idea of a garden right in the middle of the city is “fantastic.” She said, “If there were more gardens like this here, I know there would be less hungry people. It would cut their food bill and people would also eat healthier. Everything we are growing here is organic.” Since this was Dupree’s first time gardening, she admits to be-ing very skeptical when the garden began back in May. “When we started and planted the seeds, I thought it would take a year for something to grow. Within two months time, there was like an ex-plosion of vegetables and herbs in See Garden on Page 3 SPIRITUAL ROAD TRIP THROUGH THE DIOCESE Shrines, prayer gardens abound throughout Passaic, Morris and Sussex Counties By MICHAEL WOJCIK News Editor [ EDITOR’S NOTE: This story is the sec-ond in a series, “A Spiritual Road Trip through the Diocese,” featuring many of the shrines, prayer gardens, rosary walks and other devotional sites that local faithful can visit on their trav-els in the diocese in Passaic, Morris and Sussex counties this summer. ] CLIFTON — The Beacon continues its “Spiritual Road Trip through the Diocese” series with a roundup of several devotional sites, including two shrines and a rosary garden at local parishes. Our Lady of Lourdes Shrine: St. Peter the Apostle Parish, Parsippany For so many St. Peter’s parish-ioners, such as Jenny Omboldo, the natural beauty of the more-than-half-century-old Our Lady of Lourdes Shrine has given them both sereni-ty as well as lots of warm memories. “When I visit the shrine, I ask the Blessed Mother to help me with my problems,” Omboldo told The Beacon, after a Mass in 2005, mark-ing the 50th anniversary of the shrine, a smaller replica of the Our Lady of Lourdes Shrine in France. “Being at the shrine gives me a sense of peace. We are in our own little meditation with Mary. It’s a special place.” Built by Father James Smith, former pastor, in 1955 — even be-fore the parish convent or school, St. Peter’s shrine has hosted many religious services from First Holy DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS MEMORIES — The Our Lady of Lourdes Shrine at St. Peter the Apostle Parish, Parsippany, holds many special memories for people of the parish and beyond. Communions and Confirmations to sunrise Masses and even marriage proposals, Msgr. Herbert Tillyer, St. Peter’s pastor, told The Beacon. Even today, Catholics from all over visit the shrine to pray before a statue of Mary, perched above the shrine’s grotto, to light a candle or to place a bouquet of flowers there in the Blessed Mother’s honor. Helping to invite the faithful in-to God’s presence is the impressive more-than 30-foot structure, built of large pieces of stone cemented together and located across from the church at 179 Baldwin Rd., Parsippany. They form a tall trian-gle with a white-and-blue statue of Mary in a small alcove at the top. A cave-like “grotto” in the shrine houses a stone altar and is protect-ed by an iron gate. The arch of the grotto is topped with a stone cross. Looking up at the statue of Mary is a statue of Bernadette at ground level, kneeling and pray-ing with hands folded. St. Peter’s shrine is modeled after the Our Lady of Lourdes Shrine in south-ern France, the most visited pil-grimage site in the world. Its pop-ularity is credited with the appar-ent healing powers of the waters from a spring that appeared to 14-year-old Bernadette Soubiroux as she witnessed apparitions of Mary in 1858. Next to the statue of Bernadette sits a small pond ani-mated slightly by water that bub-bles up from a small fountain. “People come to spend time with Our Lord and ask Mary to help them. It gives us the strength to love just as the God who is with-in us,” Msgr. Tillyer said. St. Catherine of Bologna Shrine: St. Catherine of Bologna Parish, Ringwood In 2012, St. Catherine’s — the only faith community in the U.S. named for St. Catherine of Bologna — dedicated a shrine to his patron See Shrines on Page 2 W HAT T O D O Y OUTH V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS 5 6-7 8-9 10-11

Women At Passaic Neighborhood Center Gain Sense Of Pride As Their Garden Grows To Provide Fresh Food For Their Families

Cecile San Agustin

PASSAIC — Passaic City Hall towers nearby. On another corner is a school, a car mechanic’s shop and a doctor’s office. All these buildings are classic scenes in an urban neighborhood.

But a garden right in the middle of it all?

That may seem like an anomaly to most who live in this city, but amazing things like this are happening at Passaic Neighborhood Center for Women at St. Nicholas rectory here — among them a garden with vegetables and herbs yielding plentiful food for families in the innercity this summer.

A group of women, some who have never gardened before, tend to the crops made possible by City Green Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to establishing urban farms and gardens in northern New Jersey. Its mission is to enrich the lives of inner city residents while cultivating education in public health, nutrition and the environment.

Jamilah Dupree, a Passaic resident who visits the center, thinks the idea of a garden right in the middle of the city is “fantastic.” She said, “If there were more gardens like this here, I know there would be less hungry people. It would cut their food bill and people would also eat healthier. Everything we are growing here is organic.”

Since this was Dupree’s first time gardening, she admits to being very skeptical when the garden began back in May. “When we started and planted the seeds, I thought it would take a year for something to grow. Within two months time, there was like an explosion of vegetables and herbs in our garden,” she said.

Some of the vegetables and herbs that can be found include lettuce, kale, tomatoes, onions, peppers, basil, rosemary and cilantro. Ana Estrada, another client at the center, said, “I am going to make soup and salad with today’s harvest.”

The neighborhood center, which offers many programs to women in one of the poorest cities in the state of New Jersey, welcomes the addition of the garden to its activities.

Sister of Christian Charity Mary Irene Sorber, a volunteer at the center, who coordinates the garden project, said, “The women are so happy and so proud to have this garden that benefits their families. What has touched me the most is how they are working together and sharing what is grown. Each harvest, they collect the vegetables and herbs and then they divide it up to bring home to their families.”

Because many of the women were new to gardening, City Green offered an educational workshop and a consultant assists the project. Claudia Urdanivia, program operations manager for City Green, visited the women the day The Beacon came. “I definitely see our mission at work here. I feel very happy,” she said. “This was a great location to build a garden especially with this group of women.”

City Green is also supporting projects at other diocesan locations. There is a rooftop garden at diocesan Catholic Charities agency, Straight and Narrow in Paterson and St. Bonaventure Parish in Paterson will soon be hosting its own garden in mid-August. Many of these gardens are possible with a “Dig In” grant, funded by the Passaic County Board of Chosen Freeholders.

The Passaic Neighborhood Center for Women, which opened last September and is partly funded by Partners in Faith, the diocesan capital and development campaign, was opened to be a place for women to meet, share and grow. It has welcomed many women through its doors since it began bringing hope and empowerment to the heart of families — the mothers. Other programs offered include English as a Second Language, quilting and computer classes. There is also a small area for women to bring their children to the center so they can play together.

Dupree, who also takes computer classes at the center, said, “I love coming here. The sisters that serve here are such caring and loving women. I also enjoy the diversity among all of us here.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Women+At+Passaic+Neighborhood+Center+Gain+Sense+Of+Pride+As+Their+Garden+Grows+To+Provide+Fresh+Food+For+Their+Families/1773429/219493/article.html.

Shrines, Prayer Gardens Abound Throughout Passaic, Morris And Sussex Counties

Michael Wojcik

[EDITOR’S NOTE: This story is the second in a series, “A Spiritual Road Trip through the Diocese,” featuring many of the shrines, prayer gardens, rosary walks and other devotional sites that local faithful can visit on their travels in the diocese in Passaic, Morris and Sussex counties this summer.]

CLIFTON — The Beacon continues its “Spiritual Road Trip through the Diocese” series with a roundup of several devotional sites, including two shrines and a rosary garden at local parishes.

Our Lady of Lourdes Shrine: St. Peter the Apostle Parish, Parsippany

For so many St. Peter’s parishioners, such as Jenny Omboldo, the natural beauty of the more-than-half-century-old Our Lady of Lourdes Shrine has given them both serenity as well as lots of warm memories.

“When I visit the shrine, I ask the Blessed Mother to help me with my problems,” Omboldo told The Beacon, after a Mass in 2005, marking the 50th anniversary of the shrine, a smaller replica of the Our Lady of Lourdes Shrine in France. “Being at the shrine gives me a sense of peace. We are in our own little meditation with Mary. It’s a special place.”

Built by Father James Smith, former pastor, in 1955 — even before the parish convent or school, St. Peter’s shrine has hosted many religious services from First Holy Communions and Confirmations to sunrise Masses and even marriage proposals, Msgr. Herbert Tillyer, St. Peter’s pastor, told The Beacon.

Even today, Catholics from all over visit the shrine to pray before a statue of Mary, perched above the shrine’s grotto, to light a candle or to place a bouquet of flowers there in the Blessed Mother’s honor.

Helping to invite the faithful into God’s presence is the impressive more-than 30-foot structure, built of large pieces of stone cemented together and located across from the church at 179 Baldwin Rd., Parsippany. They form a tall triangle with a white-and-blue statue of Mary in a small alcove at the top. A cave-like “grotto” in the shrine houses a stone altar and is protected by an iron gate. The arch of the grotto is topped with a stone cross.

Looking up at the statue of Mary is a statue of Bernadette at ground level, kneeling and praying with hands folded. St. Peter’s shrine is modeled after the Our Lady of Lourdes Shrine in southern France, the most visited pilgrimage site in the world. Its popularity is credited with the apparent healing powers of the waters from a spring that appeared to 14- year-old Bernadette Soubiroux as she witnessed apparitions of Mary in 1858. Next to the statue of Bernadette sits a small pond animated slightly by water that bubbles up from a small fountain.

“People come to spend time with Our Lord and ask Mary to help them. It gives us the strength to love just as the God who is within us,” Msgr. Tillyer said.

St. Catherine of Bologna Shrine: St. Catherine of Bologna Parish, Ringwood

In 2012, St. Catherine’s — the only faith community in the U.S. named for St. Catherine of Bologna — dedicated a shrine to his patron saint, who also is known patron of the arts. A statue at the center of the shrine depicts St. Catherine, holding a paintbrush and palette to signify her special role.

Msgr. Patrick Panos, now St. Catherine’s pastor emeritus, received the statue as a gift to mark his 40th anniversary to the priesthood, so he decided to build the shrine for it. Parishioners donated memorial pavers, which surround the statue. After fund-raising was competed, a group of men of the parish, located at 112 Erskine Rd., in Ringwood, helped with the labor to make the shrine a reality. Mgr. Panos blessed the shrine in 2010 in an outdoor ceremony.

Rosary Garden: Annunciation Parish, Wayne

A statue of the Blessed Mother beams in the sunlight as it looks over a new, beautiful rosary walk, complete with circular stone path, granite benches and lush greenery, that sits on a on a patch of grass at the back of Annunciation of the Blessed Mary Church here.

The devotional space gives parishioners a peaceful place to bring their spirituality outdoors by praying and spending time in quiet reflection with the Blessed Mother. Bishop Serratelli blessed and dedicated the sacred space last fall, after celebrating a Mass to mark the parish’s 50th anniversary. Looking on with pride was Jon Zimak, a Boy Scout, who designed, planned and built the devotional space for his Eagle Scout service project.

“The rosary walk has been enhancing the spiritual life of Annunciation,” said Msgr. Peter Doody, pastor of the parish, located at 45 Urban Club Rd., Wayne.

Today, the rosary walk invites parishioners and anyone else to pray the mysteries of the rosary as they walk around a path of tan stone pavers. The path encircles the white Italian-made fiberglass statue of Mary that sits on a base made of polished concrete. At certain spots around the circle, some pavers are engraved with the mysteries of the rosary. But most other pavers are engraved with dedications from sponsoring parishioners. The faithful also can sit on any of three black granite benches, etched with the names of sponsoring families, which have been placed outside the circle of pavers.

“The rosary walk is open to anybody and is handicapped accessible,” Zimak said. “It’s a nice prayerful place with great atmosphere.”

Work on the rosary walk started after Annunciation’s parish council proposed the idea. Zimak oversaw the ambitious project. He designed the sacred space, got the parish’s approval, raised funds, secured donations of materials from businesses and organized the work of contractors and volunteers, including Boy Scouts and parish youth ministry members, Zimak said.

“With this rosary walk project, I was hoping to help bring the parish closer together as a family,” Zimak said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Shrines%2C+Prayer+Gardens+Abound+Throughout+Passaic%2C+Morris+And+Sussex+Counties/1773433/219493/article.html.

Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here