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The Beacon July 24 2014 : Page 1

Outreach, training programs listed for center Bishop visits Ogdensburg parish 11 N EWSPAPER OF THE D IOCESE OF P ATERSON , N. J. N O . 27 V OL . 48 > J ULY 24, 2014 > 5 Bishop leads diocesan youth on pilgrimage to holy sites in Spain By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN Reporter CLIFTON — Spaniards call it the “el camino” or the way, for a pilgrim-age that leads to the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, the shrine of Jesus’ apostle, St. James the Great. The traditional pilgrim-age to where his remains lay is one of the most popular pilgrimages for Catholics after Rome and Jerusalem. More than 40 pilgrims from the Paterson Diocese visited this holy site as part of a youth pilgrimage to Spain June 23 to 30 led by Bishop Serratelli and coordinated by Great Experiences Inc., a travel agency, which specializes in pil-grimages. Along with the bishop, five diocesan priests attended the pilgrimage: Father Kevin Corcoran, priest-secretary to the bishop and diocesan vice chancellor; Father Michael Lee, parochial vicar of St. Margaret Parish in Morristown, who will serve as chaplain at DePaul Catholic High School in Wayne in the fall; Father Paul Manning, diocesan vicar for evan-gelization and director of St. Paul’s Inside the Walls in Madison; and Father Owen Moran, pastor of St. Rose of Lima Parish in East Hanover. Stops on the Spain pilgrimage in addition to Santiago de Com -postela included Zamora, Salaman -ca, Alba de Tormes, Avila, Segovia and Madrid. Diocesan pilgrims walked the footsteps of Spanish saints such as St. Teresa of Avila and St. John of the Cross, both Spanish mystics, and celebrated Mass daily during the pilgrimage at many historic churches and shrines. According to the pilgrims, the weather was fantastic, with no rain and low humidity. Father Manning described the pilgrimage as perfection. “It was beautiful. It could not have been better. The cities and the sites that we visited gave us a spiritual ex-perience.” See Pilgrimage on Page 2 Q UO V ADIS By MICHAEL WOJCIK News Editor NEWTON — Twenty-year-old Sean Grealy of Our Lady Star of the Sea Parish, Lake Hopatcong attended the annual diocesan discernment retreat this year trying to get a clearer picture of the big picture in life: an answer to the major ques-tion of whether the Lord calls him to the vocation of priesthood or marriage. Grealy joined about 18 other lo-cal Catholic young men, ages 18 to 28, who came from all three counties of the diocese — Morris, Passaic and Sussex — for the Paterson Diocese’s annual Quo Vadis Dis cern ment Retreat from July 9 to 11 at the Sacred Heart Spirituality Center here, operated by the Salesian Sisters. They all asked themselves and God the same question: Where am I going with my life? Annual retreat helps young men discern their vocation down, it is precisely what all of our prayer should be. “It was great to meet other young people from around the diocese, who also are thinking about the priesthood like me. I came to Quo Vadis because I wanted a clearer pic-ture of what the priesthood is all about,” said Grealy, who has been studying exercise science at Hofstra University on Hempstead, N.Y. “I learned that people have doubts when considering marriage or priesthood and that becoming a fa-ther or a priest, if called by God, doesn’t mean that you wouldn’t have been good at the other [vocation].” See Quo Vadis on Page 2 The diocesan Vocations Office organized the retreat, where par-ticipants explored God’s call — as a priest, religious, married person or single person — during a busy schedule of activities, which includ-ed daily Mass, prayer, talks on vo-cations and the priesthood by cler-gy and seminarians and time for fellowship and quiet reflection. This year, the talks given by five semi-narians and one newly ordained priest who assisted on the retreat centered around how prayer is the way to discern God’s presence and movement in one’s life. The Mass is the highest form of prayer. When we break the parts of the Mass EL CAMINO — An interior view of Almudena Cathedral in Madrid, Spain showing the Neo-Gothic stained glass windows and art. Led by Bishop Serratelli, more than 40 pilgrims from the Paterson Diocese visited the cathedral and traveled throughout Spain for a pilgrimage around the western European country in late June. Photo/Daniel Politi Summer institute explores theology of pope emeritus By MICHAEL WOJCIK News Editor MADISON — Catholics get to know God through the Eucharist, which also remains as the central com-ponent of the New Evangeliza tion, because when Catholics get to know the Lord, they can help oth-ers know God. That was only one of countless deep, faith-filled — and underap-preciated — insights from the mind and heart of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI that 23 local Catholics learned about and examined in depth during a four-day 2014 Inaugural Summer Insti tute last DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI week. Jeffery Morrow, Ph.D, the-ology professor, helped educate and form clergy, religious and laity in Benedict’s writings, teachings and thought on theology, philosophy and the New Evan gelization dur-ing the July 7-10 institute at St. Paul Inside the Walls here, called “Pilgrim and Laborer: the Person and Teaching of Pope Benedict XVI for Today.” The Monday to Thursday ses-sions found Morrow, senior fellow of the St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology and assistant professor of undergraduate theology at Immaculate Conception Seminary at Seton Hall University, South Orange, exploring a different theme each day: “Salvation History and the Scriptures”; “Faith and Reason”; “Liturgy, Worship and the Interior Life”; and “Evangelization.” “With this innovative program [the institute], we share the best of our tradition: the teaching of one of our great recent popes. We are excited about this initial opportu-nity and confident that the inter-est in this institute will grow and its value will be perceived,” said Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s ex-ecutive director, diocesan vicar for evangelization and one of partici-pants, during his introduction on July 7. “We are convinced that Benedict’s teachings will have a long-term influence on the Church and so we are at the forefront of the Church’s effort to explore, ap-See Benedict on Page 3 3 ST. CLARE’S HEALTH SYSTEM SUPPORTS REBUILDING EFFORTS IN PHILIPPINES AFTER TYPHOON S ENIOR L IFESTYLES 6 5 BISHOP MAKES PASTORAL VISITS TO PARISH COMMUNITIES AT BLESSED SACRAMENT, CATHEDRAL V IEWPOINT 7 BISHOP IS KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT SHALOM FESTIVAL FOR SYRO-MALANKARA CATHOLICS O BITUARIES W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS 4 8-9 10-11 12

Bishop Leads Diocesan Youth On Pilgrimage To Holy Sites In Spain

Cecile San Agustin

CLIFTON — Spaniards call it the “el camino” or the way, for a pilgrimage that leads to the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, the shrine of Jesus’ apostle, St. James the Great. The traditional pilgrimage to where his remains lay is one of the most popular pilgrimages for Catholics after Rome and Jerusalem.

More than 40 pilgrims from the Paterson Diocese visited this holy site as part of a youth pilgrimage to Spain June 23 to 30 led by Bishop Serratelli and coordinated by Great Experiences Inc., a travel agency, which specializes in pilgrimages. Along with the bishop, five diocesan priests attended the pilgrimage: Father Kevin Corcoran, priest-secretary to the bishop and diocesan vice chancellor; Father Michael Lee, parochial vicar of St. Margaret Parish in Morristown, who will serve as chaplain at DePaul Catholic High School in Wayne in the fall; Father Paul Manning, diocesan vicar for evangelization and director of St. Paul’s Inside the Walls in Madison; and Father Owen Moran, pastor of St. Rose of Lima Parish in East Hanover.

Stops on the Spain pilgrimage in addition to Santiago de Com - postela included Zamora, Salaman - ca, Alba de Tormes, Avila, Segovia and Madrid. Diocesan pilgrims walked the footsteps of Spanish saints such as St. Teresa of Avila and St. John of the Cross, both Spanish mystics, and celebrated Mass daily during the pilgrimage at many historic churches and shrines. According to the pilgrims, the weather was fantastic, with no rain and low humidity.

Father Manning described the pilgrimage as perfection. “It was beautiful. It could not have been better. The cities and the sites that we visited gave us a spiritual experience.”

Both the visits to the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela and the Church of St. John of the Cross, were two spiritual highlights for Father Manning. At Compostela, the diocesan pilgrims witnessed the many international pilgrims who traveled through the “el camino,” which has starting points all throughout countries of Europe to the northwestern Spanish city.

Father Manning said, “It was moving to see pilgrims make this journey. It was also a special opportunity to celebrate Mass in this great cathedral.”

The stop at St. John of the Cross’ tomb was also a great experience for Father Manning. “He was a mystic and a poet and his works and spirituality have always inspired me throughout my life and in my priesthood,” he said.

Among the youths attending the pilgrimage was Olivia James, who traveled with the St. Rose contingent and is a student at the Aca - demy of St. Elizabeth in Convent Station. She felt awestruck to be going on her first pilgrimage. “The whole experience was out of this world,” she said.

As a Catholic school student, James already had a close connection to her faith but it was a life-affirming moment for her she said, realizing that so many other people from around the world share the same beliefs. “It’s amazing to think that I can connect with other people over my religion and to realize that the Church has been around for millennium after millennium is amazing,” said James.

One of her favorite parts of the pilgrimage was visiting Salamanca, one of the oldest universities in Europe. The city is still a university town with many students dwelling in the city. James described the place as a blend of traditional and modern. “It has kept its connections with the past and it didn’t lose its traditional ways. We were surrounded by beautiful and centuries-old buildings and in the same areas, we could find ice cream and an Internet cafés just around the corner,” she said.

During the pilgrimage, a close camaraderie was formed among the pilgrims, which added to the experience. James already considered her community at St. Rose as a family and now spending time with the bishop, she said, “Bishop Serratelli was very down to Earth. He was humble and even though, he’s a bishop, I realized we were all on the same page about our faith — we are all striving for salvation. The teens and the adults all connected so well.”

Another youth on the pilgrimage was Michael DiCaro, a student at Seton Hall Prep in West Orange. “This was one of the best experience I ever had. I got to foster so many relationships especially with God,” he said.

One memory DiCaro will never forget was being one of the lectors for Mass at a convent in Salamanca with cloistered religious sisters. “It is an amazing memory because many of the nuns don’t have contact often with the outside world. When we were leaving, one little nun came to the door and blew a kiss at us. It was a sweet gesture. I guess we moved her.”

The youth minister at St. Rose, Stephanie Politi, led a group of 11 teen-agers with Father Moran. This was her first time leading a group of teen-agers on a pilgrimage but she knew this was an opportunity she could not pass up. “It was extremely gratifying to be able to see these places not only personally, but the double joy to witness something like this through the eyes of young people,” she said.

Now that the pilgrims are back home, many memories and lifechanging moments were formed. James said, “This experience brought me even closer to my faith, especially when going to Mass. On the pilgrimage attending Mass everyday, I realized Mass was a place where people prayed for hundreds and hundreds of years trying to figure out what’s going on in the world. It was a very moving. Now, when I go to Mass I’m ready to know more deeply what is going on.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Bishop+Leads+Diocesan+Youth+On+Pilgrimage+To+Holy+Sites+In+Spain/1766656/218571/article.html.

Quo Vadis Annual Retreat Helps Young Men Discern Their Vocation

Michael Wojcik

NEWTON — Twenty-year-old Sean Grealy of Our Lady Star of the Sea Parish, Lake Hopatcong attended the annual diocesan discernment retreat this year trying to get a clearer picture of the big picture in life: an answer to the major question of whether the Lord calls him to the vocation of priesthood or marriage.

Grealy joined about 18 other local Catholic young men, ages 18 to 28, who came from all three counties of the diocese — Morris, Passaic and Sussex — for the Paterson Diocese’s annual Quo Vadis Dis cern ment Retreat from July 9 to 11 at the Sacred Heart Spirituality Center here, operated by the Salesian Sisters. They all asked themselves and God the same question: Where am I going with my life?

The diocesan Vocations Office organized the retreat, where participants explored God’s call — as a priest, religious, married person or single person — during a busy schedule of activities, which included daily Mass, prayer, talks on vocations and the priesthood by clergy and seminarians and time for fellowship and quiet reflection. This year, the talks given by five seminarians and one newly ordained priest who assisted on the retreat centered around how prayer is the way to discern God’s presence and movement in one’s life. The Mass is the highest form of prayer. When we break the parts of the Mass down, it is precisely what all of our prayer should be.

“It was great to meet other young people from around the diocese, who also are thinking about the priesthood like me. I came to Quo Vadis because I wanted a clearer picture of what the priesthood is all about,” said Grealy, who has been studying exercise science at Hofstra University on Hempstead, N.Y. “I learned that people have doubts when considering marriage or priesthood and that becoming a father or a priest, if called by God, doesn’t mean that you wouldn’t have been good at the other [vocation].”

Many of the young men who attended Quo Vadis — Latin for “Where are you going?” — echoed Grealy’s confusion about God’s call in their lives. They discerned while praying alone and by participating in Mass, Adoration, Liturgy of the Hours, the rosary and Reconciliation.

Bishop Serratelli visited the spirituality center one night to celebrate Mass with participants and had an open discussion with them after dinner. There were six priests, who led the retreat; and five seminarians, who assisted, said Father Jared Brogan, parochial vicar at St. Philip the Apostle Parish, Clifton, and assistant diocesan vocations director, who helped organize the retreat.

During the retreat, participants also got time to socialize, often sparking friendly competition and took in the bucolic beauty of the woodlands that surround the spirituality center. They hiked; played sports, such as soccer, basketball, volleyball; and enjoyed a marshmallow roast one evening. All the while, they engaged in enlightening conversations. One night, the Knights of Columbus of St. Kateri Tekakwitha Parish, Sparta, hosted a cookout for participants.

“These young men are open to God. They are serious,” said Father Brogan, who organized Quo Vadis with Father Edgar Rivera, also an assistant vocations director and parochial vicar at St. Lawrence the Martyr Parish, Chester. “We tried to encourage them to see where the Holy Spirit is working in our lives. The beautiful surroundings of bucolic Newton — along with the peace of the spirituality center’s chapel — also have created a prayerful atmosphere and have helped with discernment,” he said.

Grealy has been discerning since his freshman year in college. He has gotten involved in Catholic Campus Ministry at Hofstra and went on a mission trip with other students to provide help with recovery efforts from Hurricane Sandy. The 10-day trip included their ministering to others, while also deepening their own spirituality with daily Mass and morning and evening prayers, Grealy said.

“On the trip, I saw the Catholic faith play out in a way that I had not seen before. I also saw the priests [who minister at Hofstra] in a different way — saying Mass and conducting prayers, but also hanging out with us [students],” said Grealy, who served as an altar server, in youth ministry and in religious education at Star of the Sea, and also considers his parish’s pastor, Father Christopher Muldoon, as one of his priest role models.

The talks during Quo Vadis that centered around the Mass explored the following topics: Prayer and Discernment, Reconciling Oneself to God, Opening Oneself to the Word of God, Offering in Sacrifice, and Mission.

One of those seminarians, who gave a talk, was Stephen Prisk, a student at the Pontifical North American College in Rome, who has been serving a summer assignment at St. Anthony Parish, Hawthorne. He spoke about how the Dismissal at the conclusion of Mass encourages Christian mission.

“Fundamentally vocation is the living out of our identity or our mission. To live out our identity, according to how we were created, we need to live like God,” said Prisk, who ranked among the “good qualities” of Jesus his zeal for heaven. “We are all destined for heaven. And how we get there is through our hard work now. It’s the role of the priest to make heaven present here on Earth so that his people are prepared to one day be in the actual heaven eternally with their Lord. The priest is responsible for souls,” Prisk said.

A few retreat participants already have discerned God’s call and have decided to enter the seminary in pursuit of the priesthood, including Wade Trainor of St. Jude Parish, Hamburg, who was recently graduated from Pope John XXIII High School, Sparta. In the fall, he plans to enter St. Andrew College Seminary at Seton Hall University, South Orange. Trainor attended last year’s Quo Vadis retreat.

“The retreat has helped me understand prayer. My prayer life has intensified. Now, I am more open to God’s will by realizing that we all have wants and desires, but also that God calls us to become what He wants us to be,” Trainor said. “I also learned that it’s a good thing to be called by God and that God called men to become priests at different stages of their lives on His time.”

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Quo+Vadis+Annual+Retreat+Helps+Young+Men+Discern+Their+Vocation/1766657/218571/article.html.

Summer Institute Explores Theology Of Pope Emeritus

Michael Wojcik

MADISON — Catholics get to know God through the Eucharist, which also remains as the central component of the New Evangeliza tion, because when Catholics get to know the Lord, they can help others know God.

That was only one of countless deep, faith-filled — and underappreciated — insights from the mind and heart of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI that 23 local Catholics learned about and examined in depth during a four-day 2014 Inaugural Summer Insti tute last week. Jeffery Morrow, Ph.D, theology professor, helped educate and form clergy, religious and laity in Benedict’s writings, teachings and thought on theology, philosophy and the New Evan gelization during the July 7-10 institute at St. Paul Inside the Walls here, called “Pilgrim and Laborer: the Person and Teaching of Pope Benedict XVI for Today.”

The Monday to Thursday sessions found Morrow, senior fellow of the St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology and assistant professor of undergraduate theology at Immaculate Conception Seminary at Seton Hall University, South Orange, exploring a different theme each day: “Salvation History and the Scriptures”; “Faith and Reason”; “Liturgy, Worship and the Interior Life”; and “Evangelization.”

“With this innovative program [the institute], we share the best of our tradition: the teaching of one of our great recent popes. We are excited about this initial opportunity and confident that the interest in this institute will grow and its value will be perceived,” said Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director, diocesan vicar for evangelization and one of participants, during his introduction on July 7. “We are convinced that Benedict’s teachings will have a long-term influence on the Church and so we are at the forefront of the Church’s effort to explore, appreciate and integrate his teachings into her daily life, practice and theology,” he said.

Throughout the four days, Morrow emphasized that “there is a lot of continuity from St. John Paul II to Benedict to Pope Francis” on the Church teachings, such as the role of the laity. Each pope explores Church teaching, which remains the consistent, by placing on them their own unique interpretation, said Morrow, a Jewish convert to Catholicism, who was influenced by Benedict’s writings.

“What is unique about Benedict is that he is grounded in Scripture. He makes constant reference to Scripture in all of this writings. He looks at theology as the history of interpreting Scripture,” said Morrow, who teaches a wide range of courses including the Theology of Pope Benedict XVI. “My students [at Immaculate Conception] are usually surprised about how clearly, compellingly and beautifully he communicates what he is writing — about what the Christian life is.”

Benedict also states that the New Evangelization “happens in our ordinary lives in our families, at work and with our friends, “which is important all the time,” said Morrow during his series at St. Paul’s, the diocesan evangelization center.

The Beacon visited Morrow on Thursday for his presentation on “Liturgy, Worship and the Interior Life.” He spoke about Benedict’s idea of the Mass as “Heaven touching Earth, so that it touches us and so we can extend it in our own lives. We are called to bring Christ to Earth.”

“Benedict tries to lift the veil. He wants us to see that there are more people around us — angels and saints — to help us. We are not alone,” Morrow said. “Benedict is convinced that if we live with this in our minds, life would be easier. It would be easier to say yes to the things we need to, say no to the things we shouldn’t do and say the right things when we need to.”

Benedict, who served as pontiff from April 19, 2005 until his resignation on Feb. 28, 2013, outlines four ways that Catholics can cultivate a deep interior life of prayer and reflection: the Eucharist, frequent Confession, prayer and prayerful reading of Scripture, Morrow said.

“Benedict thinks that becoming a saint is to speak to God as a friend to a friend,” Morrow said. “God wants to light a fire under us. It is the privilege, responsibility and burden of our Baptism and Confirmation that we talk about the Church and the Sacraments. That’s our job. We must be willing to step out of your comfort zones to help others,” he said.

The idea for the summer institute came from and energetic and passionate, Catholic professional woman, who called Father Manning early in 2014. This woman, who remains anonymous, offered funding for a program that promoted the teachings of Benedict. She and her husband “felt that his teachings are brilliant and underappreciated and that the local Church needed to find a way to promote it and make it more accessible,” the priest said in his introduction.

One of the participants, Joe Reilly of St. Clare Parish, Clifton, called the institute “a worthwhile experience that teaches us about Benedict’s writings.”

“Benedict is a well-respected theologian. The institute has given me a wealth of information about his writings. I was not familiar with them before [attending]. His writings are not as austere as those impressions we get from the media,” Reilly said.

Father Manning picked up on Morrow’s theme about the continuity of Church teaching in the writings of John Paul II, Benedict and Francis.

“Benedict does not sound much different from Francis. We discovered both John Paul II and Francis in the teachings of Benedict,” such as those about Vatican II, Father Manning said. “We discovered that Benedict honored and continued the work of the one who came before [John Paul], and passed on the Gospel initiative and impetus that moves his successor [Francis]. All three are God’s gift to us at the time and place we need them,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Summer+Institute+Explores+Theology+Of+Pope+Emeritus/1766659/218571/article.html.

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