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The Beacon The Beacon June 19 2014 : Page 1

Diocese implements parish reconfiguration plan in Paterson Outreach, training programs listed for center 6-7-8-9 N EWSPAPER OF THE D IOCESE OF P ATERSON , N. J. N O . 22 V OL . 48 > J UNE 19, 2014 > 12 C ENTENNIAL C ELEBRATION Mass celebrated by bishop concludes 100th anniversary at St. Paul Parish in Clifton By MICHAEL WOJCIK News Editor CLIFTON — Bishop Serratelli was the princi-pal celebrant of a Mass on the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity June 15 in St. Paul Church here to mark the close of the parish’s 100th anniversary celebration. At the closing Mass, the parish also placed a stone marker on the parish grounds for parishioners to remember the parish’s first 100 years of evangelization and to recognize the many different cultures who have come together to form one parish family and who have been an important part of the parish’s history. Bishop Serratelli blessed the marker 100 YEARS OF EVANGELIZATION — St. Paul Church in Clifton is shown on June 15, the Feast of the Most Blessed Trinity, when Bishop Serratelli made a pastoral visit to the parish to celebrate Mass to close the parish’s year-long observance of its 100th anniversary. Beacon photo / Joe Gigli in a ceremony at the conclusion of the Mass. Father Leonardo Jaramillo, pastor of St. Paul’s, said, “For our parish, it has been an honor and a blessing to celebrate 100 years. The parish community is happy to be part of the Church’s history as we mark the cen-tennial.” “Our history began with our first pastor, Father Paul Guterl, who worked very hard to bring together families of different cul-tures and languages to become one family. We continue that legacy in spreading the Good News to all.” To start the centennial, the parish began the year-long celebration on June 29, 2013, the feast of Ss. Peter and Paul, with Bishop Emeritus Rodimer — a former pastor of St. Paul’s — coming back to celebrate Mass there. Throughout the year, the parish hosted several pilgrimages to local sites, fundraisers and social events. The parish also raised mon-ey for an elevator for the church as a gift for the centennial, which will be installed soon. Originally founded by a mostly Italian and Irish population, St. Paul’s today serves See Centennial on Page 2 W ORLD C UP F EVER By MICHAEL WOJCIK News Editor OAK RIDGE — Soccer fans everywhere have turned their attention to the Fifa World Cup 2014 in Brazil to cheer on their favorites among the 32 best teams on the planet — all burning with desire to score as many goals as possible on their way to clinching their ul-timate goal: winning the coveted World Cup. Avid soccer fan, player and coach Father Oak Ridge, Stockholm parishes kick off drive to collect soccer balls for poor youth worldwide spending time with video series by Father friends and family. When Robert Barron, author, he returns to the diocese speaker and theologian. It in mid-July, he said he touched their hearts, plans to ship more soccer watching footage of chil-balls down to Bal timore to dren in Uganda, playing a Ugandan friend in sem-soccer with a makeshift inary, who is expected to ball. make sure that the special “The idea [for ‘Soccer package gets to the Gulu Balls for Joy’] came out Archdiocese there. of the social action com-“The entire church [of mittee. It told them to ‘Go St. Thomas] looks like a for it’ — anything to help sporting goods store with the kids,” Father Matthew all the balls,” said Father Twiggs, pastor of both Madrid, who noted that parishes, said. “With the members of the parish World Cup going on, it have been helping to de-[the drive] is timely and flate the balls for shipping, draws attention to it.” packing them and includ-Also drawing attention ing an air pump with each to the soccer ball drive GOAL! — Father Jhon Madrid, package. “Parish ioners of parochial vicar at St. Thomas the was a photo that ap-both St. Thomas and St. Apostle Parish Oak Ridge, and St. peared in a recent issue John Vianney have been John Vianney Parish, Stockholm, of The Beacon, announc-so generous. For the kids is shown kicking a soccer ball in ing the effort. Seeing it, [who live in these poor a caricature by Lisa “Chillpaw” representatives from two countries, often torn by vi-Pawlick, a parishioner of St. parishes, St. Vincent olence] the balls are life-Thomas who is a professional Martyr in Madison and savers. We are not send-graphics artist. St. Thomas of Aquin in ing weapons. We are Ogdensburg, called to ex-sending soccer balls,” he said. press interest in contributing to the drive, Some parishioners got the idea for the soc-Father Twiggs said. cer ball drive last November, while watching The footage of the Ugandan children play-See Drive on Page 4 “Catholicism: a Jour ney of a Lifetime,” a DVD DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Jhon Madrid, parochial vicar of St. Thomas the Apostle Parish here and St. John Vianney Parish, Stockholm, loves kicking in a goal during a game and watching the World Cup, but has turned his attention to a bigger goal this summer. The Colombian-born priest has been helping both Sussex County parishes collect soccer balls for poor children in Colombia, Honduras and Uganda. Thus far, his “Soccer Balls for Joy” drive as netted more than 300 balls and more than $250 in monetary donations to help defray the cost of shipping. “As the World Cup in Brazil came near, we invited others to share the joy of the game of soccer with each other and give back. As Christians, we have a social responsibility to help the least in our society, especially the kids,” said Father Madrid, who “kicked off” “Soccer Balls for Joy” on June 2, ahead of the start of the World Cup on June 12. The drive will end on, July 12, the World Cup’s closing day. “Children around the world love soccer more than any other sport. Yet, many children in poverty have never played with a real toy or an actual soccer ball. For many children having a ball is like the best PlayStation,” he said. So far, Father Madrid has shipped soccer balls to a friend from seminary in Caucasia, Colombia, and to the capital of Honduras, Tegucigalpa, for free thanks to a friend in Morristown — shortly before his flight on June 13 to Colombia, where he has been Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS O BITUARIES 5 10-11 12 14 15

Centennial Celebration

Michael Wojcik

Mass celebrated by bishop concludes 100th anniversary at St. Paul Parish in Clifton

CLIFTON — Bishop Serratelli was the principal celebrant of a Mass on the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity June 15 in St. Paul Church here to mark the close of the parish’s 100th anniversary celebration.

At the closing Mass, the parish also placed a stone marker on the parish grounds for parishioners to remember the parish’s first 100 years of evangelization and to recognize the many different cultures who have come together to form one parish family and who have been an important part of the parish’s history. Bishop Serratelli blessed the marker in a ceremony at the conclusion of the Mass.

Father Leonardo Jaramillo, pastor of St. Paul’s, said, “For our parish, it has been an honor and a blessing to celebrate 100 years. The parish community is happy to be part of the Church’s history as we mark the centennial.”

“Our history began with our first pastor, Father Paul Guterl, who worked very hard to bring together families of different cultures and languages to become one family. We continue that legacy in spreading the Good News to all.”

To start the centennial, the parish began the year-long celebration on June 29, 2013, the feast of Ss. Peter and Paul, with Bishop Emeritus Rodimer — a former pastor of St. Paul’s — coming back to celebrate Mass there.

Throughout the year, the parish hosted several pilgrimages to local sites, fundraisers and social events. The parish also raised money for an elevator for the church as a gift for the centennial, which will be installed soon.

Originally founded by a mostly Italian and Irish population, St. Paul’s today serves an increasing population of Latino Catholics in Clifton. More than a year ago, the parish reached out to this community by starting its first Spanish-language Mass. About 400 Spanish-speakers attended that first Mass to “worship God in their own language,” said Father Jaramillo, a native of Colombia.

The Spanish-speaking faithful have gotten more involved in parish life, including participation on the pastoral council and in other ministries, Father Jaramillo said.

The welcoming legacy of St. Paul’s started in the late 19th century, when the Catholic population began to grow “when the peace and quiet of the [Ackquackanonk] area [of Clifton] attracted many people from the crowded ethnic neighborhoods in New York City,” according to St. Paul’s history. Catholics attended Masses at the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist and St. George Parish, both in Paterson; St. Nicholas Parish, Passaic; or national parishes, St. Paul’s history states.

St. Paul’s started in 1911, when a group of local men gathered to explore the possibility of founding a parish and the next year founded the Ackquackanonk Association. In 1912, more than 100 families agreed to the formation of a parish in Clifton that became a mission of St. George Parish, Paterson, while the Sisters of Charity began staffing the parish’s first Sunday school, according St. Paul’s history.

Also in 1912, Masses for St. Paul’s were started in Firehouse No. 1 on Harding Avenue and later were moved to Firehouse No. 4 on Main Avenue. Then, property at the corner of Union Avenue and Second Street was purchased and St. Paul’s was incorporated as a parish. In 1914, Father Paul Guterl, was appointed the first pastor, followed by the completion of the first church, a wood-frame structure, and the rectory on Union Avenue. Ln 1922, construction began on a parish school building on property purchased at the corner of Main and Washington avenues. In 1937, the wood-frame church was demolished to made way for the current stone building, which was completed in 1939.

In recent years, St. Paul’s has continued to grow with its active youth ministry and Mass of the Feast of Christ the King, which celebrates the parish’s ethnic diversity.

“St. Paul’s is a welcoming parish and we continue to grow,” said Father Jaramillo.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Centennial+Celebration/1739171/214280/article.html.

World Cup Fever

Michael Wojcik

OAK RIDGE — Soccer fans everywhere have turned their attention to the Fifa World Cup 2014 in Brazil to cheer on their favorites among the 32 best teams on the planet — all burning with desire to score as many goals as possible on their way to clinching their ultimate goal: winning the coveted World Cup.

Avid soccer fan, player and coach Father Jhon Madrid, parochial vicar of St. Thomas the Apostle Parish here and St. John Vianney Parish, Stockholm, loves kicking in a goal during a game and watching the World Cup, but has turned his attention to a bigger goal this summer. The Colombian-born priest has been helping both Sussex County parishes collect soccer balls for poor children in Colombia, Honduras and Uganda. Thus far, his “Soccer Balls for Joy” drive as netted more than 300 balls and more than $250 in monetary donations to help defray the cost of shipping.

“As the World Cup in Brazil came near, we invited others to share the joy of the game of soccer with each other and give back. As Christians, we have a social responsibility to help the least in our society, especially the kids,” said Father Madrid, who “kicked off” “Soccer Balls for Joy” on June 2, ahead of the start of the World Cup on June 12. The drive will end on, July 12, the World Cup’s closing day. “Children around the world love soccer more than any other sport. Yet, many children in poverty have never played with a real toy or an actual soccer ball. For many children having a ball is like the best PlayStation,” he said.

So far, Father Madrid has shipped soccer balls to a friend from seminary in Caucasia, Colombia, and to the capital of Honduras, Tegucigalpa, for free thanks to a friend in Morristown — shortly before his flight on June 13 to Colombia, where he has been spending time with friends and family. When he returns to the diocese in mid-July, he said he plans to ship more soccer balls down to Bal timore to a Ugandan friend in seminary, who is expected to make sure that the special package gets to the Gulu Archdiocese there.

“The entire church [of St. Thomas] looks like a sporting goods store with all the balls,” said Father Madrid, who noted that members of the parish have been helping to deflate the balls for shipping, packing them and including an air pump with each package. “Parish ioners of both St. Thomas and St. John Vianney have been so generous. For the kids [who live in these poor countries, often torn by violence] the balls are lifesavers. We are not sending weapons. We are sending soccer balls,” he said.

Some parishioners got the idea for the soccer ball drive last November, while watching “Catholicism: a Jour ney of a Lifetime,” a DVD video series by Father Robert Barron, author, speaker and theologian. It touched their hearts, watching footage of children in Uganda, playing soccer with a makeshift ball.

“The idea [for ‘Soccer Balls for Joy’] came out of the social action committee. It told them to ‘Go for it’ — anything to help the kids,” Father Matthew Twiggs, pastor of both parishes, said. “With the World Cup going on, it [the drive] is timely and draws attention to it.”

Also drawing attention to the soccer ball drive was a photo that appeared in a recent issue of The Beacon, announcing the effort. Seeing it, representatives from two parishes, St. Vincent Martyr in Madison and St. Thomas of Aquin in Ogdensburg, called to express interest in contributing to the drive, Father Twiggs said.

The footage of the Ugandan children playing soccer in the “Catholicism” video also reminded Father Madrid of his childhood in Colombia.

“We didn’t have the resources there that we have here. We made soccer balls out of unused socks that we filled with paper,” said Father Madrid, who played on teams from his hometown, in high school and on a short lived professional team, when he was about 18. Today, the young priest teaches religion and coaches a soccer team at Immaculate Conception Regional School, Franklin. “The kids in school are into professional soccer. Sometimes they know more than me,” he said.

Father Madrid, who wrote a paper about soccer and religion during his priesthood studies, also can get theological, when speaking about his beloved sport — known as “football” in the rest of the world. “Playing soccer teaches you about teamwork and relationships and something about the priesthood,” Father Madrid said. “As a priest, you are who you are, because of the people. You can’t do it alone. We need the people,” he said.

Recently, Father Madrid took Father Twiggs to an exhibition match between the national teams of Portugal and Ireland at MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford. There, he got to meet members of the Portuguese team, including the one player is is often called best in the world, Christiano Ronaldo. The team also signed a soccer ball for him. Still a die-hard fan of the NFL’s Green Bay Packers Father Twiggs admitted that Father Madrid has helped him get “warmed up” to soccer.

No doubt, Father Madrid now is watching the World Cup with family and friends down in Colombia, which “has no other sport” and is “crazy for the World Cup,” he said.

A friend of Father Madrid’s and a fellow Colombian and soccer enthusiast, Deacon Luis Alberto Hernandez, noted young people in their native country consider a soccer ball their most prized possession — more than cell phones. “That’s because they are so expensive,” he said.

“What amazing work that Father Jhon is doing [with ‘Soccer Balls for Joy],” said Deacon Hernandez, who is serving Our Lady of the Magnificat Parish, Kinnelon, this summer. “If one kid in a town gets a ball, that means that 12 to 15 kids will be able to play with it — and they will be playing with it for years to come.”

Anyone interested in donating a soccer ball to “Soccer Balls for Joy” can drop it off at either St. Thomas Church, Oak Ridge, or St. John Vianney Church, Stockholm. Those wishing to make a donation for a soccer ball can make a check out to “St. Thomas — Soccer.”

For more information, call St. Thomas Parish at (973) 208-0090.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/World+Cup+Fever/1739181/214280/article.html.

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