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The Beacon June 5, 2014 : Page 1

Bishop marks 50th anniversary of Mendham school Outreach, training programs listed for center 16 N EWSPAPER OF THE D IOCESE J UNE 5, 2014 OF P ATERSON , N. J. N O . 20 V OL . 48 > > 12 E UCHARISTIC C ATECHESIS Bishop Serratelli leads annual celebration with 166 First Communicants from diocese By MICHAEL WOJCIK News Editor CLIFTON — Bishop Serratelli told a selection of First Communicants from around the diocese to share Jesus’ love and sacrifice for us — embodied in the Eucharist we re-ceive at the Mass — by living lives of faith in service to others, on Sunday, June 1 in St. Philip the Apostle Church here at his annual celebration, “Eucharistic Catechesis and Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament.” The 166 participating First Communicants, mostly second-graders, represented parishes from around the diocese. They came to the celebration with their families, filling St. Philip’s to standing room only. Bishop Serratelli presented a catechetical lesson and then invit-ed some of the children to ask him questions about faith. The celebra-tion included a procession with the First Communicants and honored Jesus with Adoration and Bene -diction of the Blessed Sacrament. “I’m happy to have you here to-day,” Bishop Serratelli told the First Communicants, whose parishes se-lected them to participate in the annual celebration, sponsored by the diocesan Office of Catechesis. He reminded them that they are special not only because they have received Christ in the Holy Eucharist, “but also because you take the place of everyone your age [in the diocese, who has also re-ceived his or her first Holy Com -munion this year].” For the catechesis, Bishop Serratelli walked to the center aisle of St. Philip’s. He spoke about the life of the late Marian Anderson, a famous singer, who notched many accomplishments in her life, includ-ing becoming the first African-American to perform at the Metro -politan Opera. Yet she considered Continued on Page 8 GIFT FROM THE BISHOP — Bishop Serratelli presents gifts — small figurines of Jesus — to the 166 First Communicants from around the diocese, who participated in his annual celebration, “Eucharistic Catechesis and Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament,” on June 1 in St. Philip the Apostle Church, Clifton. The bishop focused his catechesis on encouraging the young Catholics to live their faith in service to others. Beacon photo / Joe Gigli O N F EAST OF C ORPUS C HRISTI , F EED THE H UNGRY Bishop initiates diocesan-wide food collection to fill Catholic Charities’ pantries in summer By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN Reporter PATERSON — Each summer, the food pantries of diocesan Catholic Charities literally run dry. Pantry shelves are empty summer after summer — although the work of feeding the hungry never ends. To alleviate this annual summer food shortage, Bishop Serratelli has initiated the first-ever diocesan-wide food collection to be taken up at weekend Masses on the Feast of Corpus Christi (The Body of Christ), June 21-22. The collection, sponsored by Catholic Charities, will help assist those who need food in Morris, Passaic and Sussex counties. “The urgent cry to feed the hun-gry is as old as the Scriptures and as recent as today’s headlines,” the bishop said in a letter to all parish-es urging them to make the food drive as successful as possible. “In Biblical times, Joseph, in interpret-ing one of Pharaoh’s dreams, DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS warned Pharaoh of coming famine. list of suggested food items need-Joseph was charged by Pharaoh to ed, each parish has been designat-ready Egypt and Canaan and so ed to collect one of two specific gathered grain from all over the food items for the Corpus Christi land. When the famine came, there collection. Some examples include were sufficient stores for all. a collection of canned meats and “Rather than con-fish at some parishes tinue the practice of while other parishes last minute emergency will collect boxes of appeals again this year, pasta. An nouncements we have decided to will go out so parish-take a lesson from the ioners will know what story of Joseph and specific food item to the famine in Egypt. donate. We know the famine Joe Duffy, president will come again this of diocesan Catholic summer. Each year we Charities, said, “In or-celebrate the Feast of der to ensure we have Corpus Christi as the sufficient supplies of summer begins. Con -the basic food needs, ducting a diocesan-we are providing lim-wide food drive in all ited choices to each B ISHOP S ERRATELLI our parishes to literal-parish. Limiting the ly feed the Body of choices will assure vol-Christ is a wonderful way to ob-ume of major items needed and serve this feast.” lessen likelihood of specific item Different from other collections shortages.” in which parishioners are given a The collection will also assist cry to feed the hungry is as old as the Scriptures and as recent as today’s headlines. ” “ The urgent the growing number of parishes that operate their own food pantry. While Catholic Charities will re-ceive the food collected in this drive, the agencies will share these donations with any parish pantry having a need. To address the food drive to parishioners, each parish received a packet from the diocesan Catholic Charities office. The packet in-cludes a poster to be posted at churches. Bulletin announcements will be made and some parish-ioners may receive an email from their parish office. Over the next couple of weeks, Catholic Charities will call parish-es to discuss delivery of the food to the agencies the week after the collection. “It would be a tremendous help if each parish could deliver the food they collect to us,” said Duffy. “If they cannot, we will make arrange-ments and schedule a pick-up.” There will be three local delivery sites in each of the three counties of the Diocese — in Passaic County, the Father English Community Center in Paterson; in Morris County, the cafeteria at St. Mary Parish in Denville, and in Sussex County, the See Feed the hungry on Page 3 2 ON ASCENSION THURSDAY, BISHOP ADMINISTERS SACRAMENT OF CONFIRMATION Y OUTH V IEWPOINT 4 MADISON PARISH OFFERS PROGRAMS, EVENTS THAT FOCUS ON BLESSED MOTHER W HAT T O D O 5 14 NJCC: BIRTH PARENTS MUST BE ALERTED TO CHANGES IN STATE ADOPTION LAW O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS 6-7 10-11 12 15

Eucharistic Catechesis

Michael Wojcik

Bishop Serratelli leads annual celebration with 166 First Communicants from diocese

CLIFTON — Bishop Serratelli told a selection of First Communicants from around the diocese to share Jesus’ love and sacrifice for us — embodied in the Eucharist we receive at the Mass — by living lives of faith in service to others, on Sunday, June 1 in St. Philip the Apostle Church here at his annual celebration, “Eucharistic Catechesis and Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament.”

The 166 participating First Communicants, mostly secondgraders, represented parishes from around the diocese. They came to the celebration with their families, filling St. Philip’s to standing room only. Bishop Serratelli presented a catechetical lesson and then invited some of the children to ask him questions about faith. The celebration included a procession with the First Communicants and honored Jesus with Adoration and Bene - diction of the Blessed Sacrament.

“I’m happy to have you here today,” Bishop Serratelli told the First Communicants, whose parishes selected them to participate in the annual celebration, sponsored by the diocesan Office of Catechesis. He reminded them that they are special not only because they have received Christ in the Holy Eucharist, “but also because you take the place of everyone your age [in the diocese, who has also received his or her first Holy Com - munion this year].”

For the catechesis, Bishop Serratelli walked to the center aisle of St. Philip’s. He spoke about the life of the late Marian Anderson, a famous singer, who notched many accomplishments in her life, including becoming the first African- American to perform at the Metro - politan Opera. Yet she considered her best accomplishment being able to care for her mother, who worked several jobs to provide for her poor family, “returning to her the great love and sacrifices she gave to me,” said Bishop Serratelli, quoting Anderson.

“Jesus has given us all his love. He sacrificed his very life, so we can become God’s family here on Earth. So much did Jesus love us that, at the Last Supper, he took bread and said, ‘This is my Body’ and took wine and said, ‘This is my Blood’ and gave to those Apostles and to everyone of us the most beautiful gift: himself in Holy Communion,” Bishop Serratelli told the children, dressed immaculately in suits and white dresses. “The greatest day we will receive joy and happiness is not simply the day we receive him [in the Eucharist] — that’s a great privilege, honor and joy — but when we who receive Jesus in our hearts return his love and sacrifice for us to others, showing them by the way we live and care for one another that we love them as Jesus loves us.”

Bishop Serratelli also related the story about St. Dominic Savio, one of the youngest canonized saints of the Catholic Church. On the day of his First Communion, he did something unusual —he took a piece of paper and wrote down a number of promises he made to God the day he first received Jesus, the bishop said.

“Dominic’s promises were that Jesus and Mary will always be my best friends; I will go to church every Sunday and the Holy Days; and I will never commit a sin; I will go to Confession and Holy Communion as often as I can,” Bishop Serratelli said. “Because he remained faithful to those promises, by the time he was 15 years old, God decided to call him into heaven and make him a saint.”

Similar to Dominic Savio, the bishop said, “When you go home, get a sheet of paper, put your name on it and write, ‘My First Holy Communion’ and make just two of your promises that you want to make to Jesus. Keep it and every year and go back to it and see if you can keep those promises.”

Then, Bishop Serratelli invited some of the First Communicants to ask him any question related to faith. One boy asked him, “What gave you the idea to become a priest?’

“The desire to want to become a priest is a gift from God. God calls us [to the priesthood]. Some people discern their call when they are young; some discern it when they are older. I was very fortunate that I received the call, when I was young,” Bishop Serratelli said.

Another child asked the bishop, “Why is Pope Francis called the Holy Father?”

“Jesus is the invisible head of the Church. The pope is the visible head of the Church, who takes Jesus’ place on Earth. The Church is a family. And the pope is the head of that family, so he is called the Holy Father,” Bishop Serratelli said.

Following catechesis, Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament was held and then, the children were led in procession outside St. Philip’s. Bishop Serratelli followed, carrying the Blessed Sacrament under a canopy while the congregation sang. Benediction before the Blessed Sacrament occurred afterward with a recitation of the Divine Praises.

At the end of the celebration, Bishop Serratelli gave each one of the First Communicants a gift: glass figurine of Jesus. The children and their families were invited to a light reception in the gym of St. Philip the Apostle School, where they could meet the bishop.

Heading out of St. Philip Church after the celebration was Annemarie Shojai of St. Vincent Martyr Parish, Madison, with her son, Zahl, one of the First Communicants, and their family.

“The ceremony was so lovely,” Zahl said.

“I liked that the bishop asked us to ask him questions. He was friendly, fun and happy.”

An elated Shojai called the celebration “beautiful” and noted that the procession “stood out” as a highlight for her.

“I feel so honored [that St. Vincent’s chose Zahl to participate in the celebration],” Shojai said. “The kids got to speak to the bishop as a real person. He was very personable,” she said.

Before the First Communicants exited St. Philip’s with their families, Bishop Serratelli left them with a suggestion to strengthen their spiritual lives going forward — “let Jesus be your best friend, receive Jesus in the Eucharist often and live a good life.

“Live your lives to become saints,” Bishop Serratelli told the First Communicants.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/Eucharistic+Catechesis/1729365/212594/article.html.

On Feast Of Corpus Christi, Feed The Hungry

Cecile San Agustin

Bishop initiates diocesan-wide food collection to fill Catholic Charities’ pantries in summer

PATERSON — Each summer, the food pantries of diocesan Catholic Charities literally run dry. Pantry shelves are empty summer after summer — although the work of feeding the hungry never ends.

To alleviate this annual summer food shortage, Bishop Serratelli has initiated the first-ever diocesan-wide food collection to be taken up at weekend Masses on the Feast of Corpus Christi (The Body of Christ), June 21-22. The collection, sponsored by Catholic Charities, will help assist those who need food in Morris, Passaic and Sussex counties.

“The urgent cry to feed the hungry is as old as the Scriptures and as recent as today’s headlines,” the bishop said in a letter to all parishes urging them to make the food drive as successful as possible. “In Biblical times, Joseph, in interpreting one of Pharaoh’s dreams, warned Pharaoh of coming famine. Joseph was charged by Pharaoh to ready Egypt and Canaan and so gathered grain from all over the land. When the famine came, there were sufficient stores for all.

“Rather than continue the practice of last minute emergency appeals again this year, we have decided to take a lesson from the story of Joseph and the famine in Egypt. We know the famine will come again this summer. Each year we celebrate the Feast of Corpus Christi as the summer begins. Con - ducting a diocesan-wide food drive in all our parishes to literally feed the Body of Christ is a wonderful way to observe this feast.”

Different from other collections in which parishioners are given a list of suggested food items needed, each parish has been designated to collect one of two specific food items for the Corpus Christi collection. Some examples include a collection of canned meats and fish at some parishes while other parishes will collect boxes of pasta. Announcements will go out so parishioners will know what specific food item to donate.

Joe Duffy, president of diocesan Catholic Charities, said, “In order to ensure we have sufficient supplies of the basic food needs, we are providing limited choices to each parish. Limiting the choices will assure volume of major items needed and lessen likelihood of specific item shortages.”

The collection will also assist the growing number of parishes that operate their own food pantry. While Catholic Charities will receive the food collected in this drive, the agencies will share these donations with any parish pantry having a need.

To address the food drive to parishioners, each parish received a packet from the diocesan Catholic Charities office. The packet includes a poster to be posted at churches. Bulletin announcements will be made and some parishioners may receive an email from their parish office.

Over the next couple of weeks, Catholic Charities will call parishes to discuss delivery of the food to the agencies the week after the collection.

“It would be a tremendous help if each parish could deliver the food they collect to us,” said Duffy. “If they cannot, we will make arrangements and schedule a pick-up.”

There will be three local delivery sites in each of the three counties of the Diocese — in Passaic County, the Father English Community Center in Paterson; in Morris County, the cafeteria at St. Mary Parish in Denville, and in Sussex County, the partnership for Social Services Family Center in Franklin.

“We are hopeful that this collection will assure for the first time in recent years that there will be no shortage of food in our Catholic Charities and parish food pantries,” said Duffy. “We are very thankful to the parishes for taking part in the first Feast of Corpus Christi diocesan-wide food collection.”

“During the summer, schools are closed and parishioners often are on vacation. More than 80 schools and parishes collect food and this is the main source for pantries. The problem worsens in summer especially for children who receive free or reduced price meals and snacks Monday through Friday during the school year, but do not receive this food when school is not in session. Thus, there is even greater demand for food from Catholic Charities food pantries over the summer when the available food supplies are less,” Duffy said.

Read the full article at http://www.livedigitaleditions.com/article/On+Feast+Of+Corpus+Christi%2C+Feed+The+Hungry/1729375/212594/article.html.

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